Case Study of a New Product


2010-12-21 15:24:45

Case Study of a New Product

A look at how Redken came up with Ringlet.

Before Redken comes up with a new product concept, the company does exhaustive research.

'We look at the market, look at the competition, look at our portfolio, go to fashion shows, talk to consumers and talk to stylists,' said Melanie Dir, senior marketing manager for global marketing-styling at Redken.

What marketing executives discovered is that 50 percent of women had curly and wavy hair. And of those, 72 percent wear their hair curly or wavy at least half of the time.

So Redken set out to create a product that was about texture -- loose, luscious, frizz-free, touchable curls without crunch.

'We went to our chemist and asked 'How do you make something conditioning enough with a style resin and moisturizing with no crunch. Anytime you add conditioning agents, it tends to weigh down the hair. Whenever you want frizz control, style resin can create crunch.

'We found a way to create weightless conditioning benefits and a bonding system that provides frizz control without crunch.'

The result is Ringlet 07 Curl Perfector, a cream-gel designed to activate and rejuvenate curls and waves. It is designed for all curl types as well as permed hair.

The product, which will be available this month, contains ingredients such as coconut oil to control frizz, calcium for curl definition and honey for moisture.

Dir said it can be mixed with other Redken styling products for more hold or more shine. For example, Concrete can be used to provide strong, defined hold or Rough Paste for more texture.

'Long, luscious curls are the perfect accessories,' Dir said.



As co-founder of, a website for curly hair she began with her business partner and friend, Gretchen Heber, Michelle Breyer helped create the leading community and resource for people with curly hair. Frustrated by the lack of information on curly hair and the limited products available in the marketplace, the duo launched the site in 1998 with the help of a 14-year-old web designer. When Procter & Gamble called three years later to advertise to the® audience, Breyer knew they had indeed created a force in the industry, providing helpful information and unparalleled expertise for what was then considered a niche market.