scr
Bun

You may have heard them referred to as finger coils, comb coils, or just plain old coils, but this curly style packs a punch!  Coils and coil outs are essentially a single strand twists and single strand twist outs.

The coils themselves can be done with a just a rattail comb (or even your fingers) and your favorite styling pudding or pomade. You can wear your coils and subsequent coil-out for a few days to a week at a time. Even better, a coil out looks great on many hair lengths, whether you’re rocking a TWA or longer curls. So let’s get started!

Get the Coil Out Curly Hairstyle

  1. Coils and coil outs look best on freshly washed and conditioned hair. A key tip for pulling off this look is to thoroughly detangle before styling. This makes the actual creation of the coils a much smoother process. Apply a liberal amount of leave-in conditioner to your entire head.
  2. Depending on the size you want your coils to be, take your rattail comb and separate a small section of hair to work with. A smaller section (about a quarter of an inch or so) will yield a straw-set type curl, while a larger section (maybe an inch square) will give you a larger coil and coil out.
  3. Take a section of your hair and add a small bit of your favorite styling product from root to tip. You may find a product like Darcy’s Botanicals Organic Coconut & Aloe Moisture Pudding well suited for this style. It offers the moisture you need plus a soft hold. Comb through for even coverage.
  4. Starting close to your scalp, gently pull the comb through your hair and slowly roll the comb around. Pull down slightly as you twist the comb; this creates the coil itself. Make sure to take your time until you get the hang of it or you could tangle the hair. Remember, TWIST and PULL. Continue twisting the comb until you get through the ends. Repeat the process across your entire head.
  5. If you’re using your fingers you’ll still want to begin by combing through the ends. Then, begin twisting the hair, rolling the twist around your index finger. You still want the coil to be tight at the scalp. Smooth between your fingers as you reach the end of the coil, using your thumb and index fingers to twist the ends. Repeat the process across your entire head.
  6. Now that you’re done with the coils themselves, you can let them air dry or dry under a hooded dryer. You can wear the coils as a style, or you can proceed with the coil out process.
  7. When you’re ready for the coil out, start by adding a tiny bit of oil on your hands. You’re going to separate the individual coils into smaller sections, like separating your twists for a twist out.
  8. Take a coil and add a bit of your favorite oil or butter to the ends to help prevent frizz while pulling the coils apart. Gently stretching the coil down will make it easier to find the natural separations in your hair. Smooth the little coils through the ends and give it a little twirl on your finger. Voila! You may find that creating three to four sections within each coil will give you a fuller look. Continue to separate the rest of your coils.

The nighttime routine for your coils is pretty simple. Regardless of whether you’re still wearing the coils or have transitioned to the coil out, tie a satin scarf on at bedtime to protect the coils and keep them fresh. Refresh the coils in the morning with a spritz of leave-in conditioner and you’ll be out the door in no time.

Want More?

Not sure how to even do a twist out, much less a coil out? Watch this video on how to do a twist out on short curls, and become a pro!

Final Thoughts

Depending on how small you do your coils and how much hair you have, this style can be accomplished within one to two hours, but may last you a week or more.

 

0 Comments
When I go to the salon, my Stylist does finger coils and I sit under the dryer for 20 minutes or so. Once dry, she doesn't do too much separating as she leaves that to me to do, which is really my preference. She uses Paul Mitchell products to do mine, with Round Trip being the main styler. My coil out is always very light and will last a full week. HOWEVER, the products she uses DO NOT stand up to sweat and extreme humidity that well so I do end up making sure to apply butters and oils to them as part of my initial styling but to those who prefer not to use the heavier styler mentioned in the article, you can achieve a great coil/coilout style using lighter products. I'm not that great at doing these myself. I did it once this summer and was told my hair looked "super cute". I recall that I did not start them right at the scalp and I did medium/large size sections. When my stylist does them if she does 30-40 coils they separate into 3x as many coils. Overall it a very full and fun style and similar to twistouts and braidouts, it makes for a fabulous updo.

Social