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1962

Actress Cicely Tyson wears cornrows on the television drama "East Side/West Side."

1966

Model Pat Evans defies both black and white standards of beauty and shaves her head.

1968

Actress Diahann Carroll is the first black woman to star in a television network series, "Julia." She is a darker version of the all-American girl with straightened, curled hair.

1970

Angela Davis becomes an icon of Black Power with her large afro.

1971

Melba Tolliver is fired from the ABC affiliate in New York for wearing an afro while covering Tricia Nixon's wedding.

1977

The Jheri curl explodes on the black hair scene. Billed as a curly perm for blacks, the ultra-moist hairstyle lasts through the 1980s.

1979

Braids and beads cross the color line when Bo Derek appears with cornrows in the movie "10."

Diahann Carroll

1980

Model-actress Grace Jones sports her trademark flat-top fade.

1988

Spike Lee exposes the good hair/bad hair light-skinned/dark-skinned schism in black American in his movie "School Daze."

1990: "Sisters love the weave," "Essence" magazine declares. A variety of natural styles and locks also become more accepted.

1997: Singer Erykah Badu poses on the cover of her debut album "Baduizm" with her head wrapped, ushering in an eclectic brand of Afrocentrism.

1998: Carson Inc., creator of Dark & Lovely and Magic Shave for black men, acquires the black-owned beauty company Johnson Products of Chicago in 1998. L'Oreal purchases Carson two years later and merges it with Soft Sheen.

1999: "People" magazine names lock-topped Grammy award-winning artist Lauryn Hill one of its 50 Most Beautiful People.

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This article is great. I love the history and that "Good Hair" is included in the timeline because that movie is great. I have had to face a lot of curiousity and confusion about my race and my ethnicity because of my hair, enough that I often identify with the history of the black hair struggle even though I don't consider myself black(I don't consider myself white or hispanic either so I'm just a mystery to people). I have often worried how my hair would be perceieved in a job interview or on a date or going out. Great timeline!
Thanks for this article. The issues around black hair are myriad and complex. Why should black women have to change their perfectly beautiful hair to fit a norm that is ridiculous and racist? The sad thing is that black women have believed this nonsense when they would not accept being told to bleach their skin or change their lips! The more women who wear their hair as it is, the more accepting society will have to become. Natural hair is professional and beautiful and only a "statement" because society makes it one. Curly, like m bi-racial hair, or cottony like my kinky haired sisters, it's all beautiful.
great cliffnotes version of our hair journey and a great article. thanks so much for posting!
I love this article. It really helped me with learning about how African Americans started to hate their natural hair and change the look of their hair to look like White Americans hair. All of my life, I have always worn my hair pressed, or relaxed out of fear that I would be called names like nappy head and I always had more confidence when it was time for me to get my hair relaxed because I knew that the straighter my hair was the more I would be liked by my family and friends at school because I always got compliments about how my hair is soo pretty whenever I got my hair pressd or relaxed. Well, with a relaxer I have never grown my hair passed shoulder length due to the harsh chemicals, so this pass year I decided to grow out my natural hair to embrace my culture and to finally grow long and natural hair. All of the natural hair blogs like this one has really inspired me to. I also decided to do the same thing with my daughter's hair. She is 12 years old and when she first started to grow her hair out she got a lot of negative comments at school, like why you won't put a relaxer in your hair your hair stinks and a friend of hers offered to flat iron her hair for her. I felt really bad for my daughter and I told her that her hair is beautiful and not to worry about what other people say about her, but after months of seeing how sad she was at school by her new hairstyle change, I decided to put a relaxer back in her hair. She is happy with my decision and so am I for the time being because she is to young to deal with all the negative comments. When she is a lot older, she will try to grow out her natural hair again, but for now she likes her hair relaxed. I will continue to model my love for my natural hair to her and one day my daughter will also embrace her natural hair. Until then,I will be glad when African American natural hair is accepted by the media as beautiful hair. I know that it is beautiful or my creator would not have blessed me with this kind of hair, but with all the negative comments that people get from wearing their natural hair it is the reason why most people feel that they have to wear their hair like someone else to be accepted in this world by friends boyfriends, husbands, children and family.
:D
Excellent article, I am so glad to see that people are now more accepting of their natural hair. I am bi-racial and I have large curley hair and I use to perm it and it would damage my hair, Its been 5 years since I re-grew my hair and I wear it out big and curley, it's who I am and I am proud of the way God made it. I pray that many women of all colors become accepting of who they are and if they want to perm their hair, thats ok too.
This is so great. Thank you so much for posting this! There are so many people out there who don't understand why black people have so many hair issues and how it differs from the issues all curlies have. Being bi-racial, I grew up being told that I had bad hair by Hispanic friends and that I had pubic hair by white kids in school. My mom put a relaxer in my hair at 13, and around then black girls would say that I had good hair, because it was "softer" and would grow long. I didn't like the chemicals and how unhealthy my hair began to look after six years, so I shaved my head. Went bald for three years and then began to grow it in. I've now been natural now for over 15 years. In that time, I was told that my hair was inappropriate for the office. My hair was has always been a concern when preparing for job interviews since its been made clear that my natural hair could label me as an unworthy employee. Learning to love my hair in this world that outright deemed me ugly or unprofessional was very hard. This history breakdown gives a few factual/tangible examples of what black women have had to deal with over the years and where it originated. It's really great to see that people are finally starting to address these issues. It would be great if little girls could grow up just loving who they are and not have the same experiences that I, and many other black women, did.

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