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YouTube, Facebook, MySpace. It’s hard to believe that all three of these sites are less than five years old, since they’ve quickly become part of many teenagers’ daily routines. This is the Curly College Scene column, after all, and no one uses the Internet more than people our age. In this column I’m going to take you on a tour of what curly girls and guys are up to on the Internet, and how you can connect to the curl community right from your trusty computer.

Let’s start with Facebook. While I had an active MySpace account a couple years ago, and I surf over to YouTube once or twice a week, I can’t help but check my Facebook everyday. One of the first Facebook groups I joined was “Curly Girls — It’s not just hair, it’s a way of life!” The group’s picture alone never fails to make me smile; it’s Frieda from the comic Peanuts, with a speech bubble over her head that reads “Are you jealous of my naturally curly hair, Rick?” With more than 11,000 members and 165 discussion board topics, this group is a great place to rant, vent, or just post an encouraging message on the wall.

Marie at NaturallyCurly

Marie vlogs for NaturallyCurly.com

While you’re on Facebook, be sure to friend NaturallyCurly! Through NaturallyCurly’s profile, I discovered oodles of new groups in support of all different kinds of curly heads. A sampling of some of my favorite groups includes “My Curly Hair is the Source of my Super Powers” and “People always expect more from you when you have naturally curly hair.”

If for no other reason, you should friend NaturallyCurly so you get updates when they post new videos on YouTube. Marie’s regular vlogs detail the products and styling techniques she uses and how they affect her hair. You can find the vlogs at the site’s YouTube account, “Naturallycurlydotcom.” There are 12 up currently, with more sure to come!

YouTube is replete with videos that encourage curly girls; my favorites are the various news stories that have been done about the emerging movement of men and women learning to love their curls! YouTube is also a great place to turn if you’re looking for new ways to style your hair; I learned how to use hair sticks and how to create an Edwardian twist by watching video clips online.

Sometimes it seems like the majority of our classmates have straight hair or don’t have the confidence to rock their curls. Contributing to the forums on this web site, joining a curl-themed Facebook group or catching up on Marie’s vlogs are just some of the ways you can connect with a vibrant and knowledgeable community that embraces all types of curly hair. If you’re having a bad hair day, don’t reach for your straight iron. Reach for your computer and take advantage of the wisdom and encouragement of the online curl community!

Stay Curly,
Julia


Email your questions/comments to Julia.

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