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Old 05-01-2010, 11:02 AM   #10078
redcelticcurls
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by roseannadana View Post
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Originally Posted by redcelticcurls View Post
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Originally Posted by roseannadana View Post
It's THE OLIVE GARDEN. Who gives a flying fig that one of your "uneducated" coworkers actually ordered manicotti instead of mani-coat. Speaking in the office later in conspiratorial whispers about how embarrassing it was to you just makes you look like an idiot.
It's not even mani-coat in Italian. It's mani-coati.

And yeah, most Italian words don't sound Italian in English. Pizza, spaghetti, and cappuccino kept their sounds, but many others didn't.

I had a hard time after I moved back from Italy and I kept "mispronouncing" marinara. I kept saying it the Italian way, and people kept correcting me.
Excuse me, but she used to live in NYC so I'm pretty sure she knows everything about this subject.

As to the pronunciation, it is my understanding that this is a regional thing and in some parts of Italy they do drop the last vowel. Frankly, I think most of her linguistics actually comes from watching reruns of The Sopranos or Rocky movies.
Well, some in the south do drop the last e on words, and we hear it today in words like panettone or calzone where the "one" sounds like the English word tone instead of toe-nay.

But, the drop sounds more soft over there as opposed to over here. I can't really describe it well, but I hear the difference between a southern Italian and an American just ignoring the e.

But, hey, if she wants to get all snooty about "proper" Italian, then she should speak "proper" Italian.
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