She's got real, if loose, curls! She's at least a 2c, if more than half her head has those curls, she's a 3a. Conditioner only routines, like the one on the "live curly live free" site will enhance her curls.

As for specific products, you need find out your daughter's hair thickness, porosity and elasticity. That'll give you an idea of what her hair needs. Take a strand of shed hair.

Roll it between your fingers. If you can barely feel it, it's fine. If it's wiry and you can see it from across the room, it's coarse. Somewhere in between, it's medium. Fine hair tends to need protein. Coarse hair tends to need moisture (oils mainly).

Slide your fingers along the hair. If the hair is smooth in both directions, it has low porosity. If one way is rough and sandpaper like, it has high porosity. If one way is bumpy but not very rough, it has medium porosity. Low porosity hair tends to need moisture. High porosity hair tends to need proteins.

Last, take both ends of the hair and pull gently, not trying to break it. If the hair breaks without stretching much, the hair has low elasticity. If it stretches but does not return to the original length, it is overly elastic. If it stretches 20-50% and then returns to its original length, it has good elasticity. Low elasticity hair usually has too much protein or too little moisture. Overly elastic hair usually has too much moisture or too little protein. Elasticity changes depending on the hair treatment you do so it's a good test to do every so often to check on the health of the hair.

Stiff, straw like hair can indicate too much protein or too little moisture. Limp, fly away hair can indicate too much moisture or too little protein.

Hair frequently has conflicting properties (like my own) but that gives you a starting point to figure out the best products for your daughter.

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2c/3a-M-ii porous, good elasticity, APL, dark brown with a silver lining. Biggest enemy: frizz!