Thank you, Medussa. I will try to find it.

I would like to see part of it for myself. I am curious about this whole twerking in unison thing. It's a little too handy for the entire "twerk team" to be available, wearing a school gym uniform, when a fellow student randomly asks if anyone wants to help him make a video for class. Smells like a cover story for a plan to me.

I did read comments where parents said it is the schools fault that a twerk team existed. How did they not know? They failed the children. Oh brother. I also read several other comments saying they should not have been punished at all. I still don't know exactly how I feel about the punishment. I would have never survived in a school with dress code, uniforms, or restrictions on dance. Don't tell me how to dress or move are two of my biggies. BUT looking at it from a school admin perspective, they may have gotten off light. They are aware of the no "provocative" dance clause, the zero tolerance sexual harassment policy, and also signed a document saying they would not do anything to disrupt school classes. That's 3 potential rules broken, per the school. One alone carries a 5 day suspension.
Originally Posted by Fifi.G
Right, but "provocative" is in the eye of the beholder isn't it? To be "provocative", it has to be intended to provoke another person into a sexual reaction. What if that's not what they're doing and they just think it's a cool move?
Originally Posted by Amneris
Provocative absolutely is in the eye of the beholder. As I stated, I was doing dances others would call provocative, nasty, dirty, etc in school. Some that were in fact simulated sex on the dance floor, and long before I ever actually did the act. It was just dance for me, and moves I saw on MTV that I thought were great, because I love dance. The main point is, in this case, the school is the beholder and they had previously and explicitly deemed this "provocative".
Originally Posted by Fifi.G
And if my kid had been in that school, I would have had a huge issue with that. I'd like to know if any non-African-based dances get the "provocative" label and how the school gets to decide there is a moral interpretation of other peoples' cultural traditions.
Get used to me. Black, confident, cocky; my name, not yours; my religion, not yours; my goals, my own; get used to me. -Muhammad Ali