As I said earlier it is their hair to do with as they please but I don't understand the purpose of this " education" and what is the intended result. Racial cumbaya over hair? why have an event focused solely on eliminating stereotypes in another race when there is so much of the same thing among blacks? And why care what others think or don't think about my hair?. I personally don't give a darn about other people's misperceptions of how my hair feels. This exhibit has the feel of trying to justify ourselves and make white society okay and accepting of us. That honestly is what rubs me wrong. I went natural because I accept me. If others don't that's their problem.
. If the point is they think for a minute letting people cop a feel this one time will get them to leave them alone forgetaboutit. I have friends of all races who I keep my hair in a ponytail around because as soon as they see me they go straight for the hair. The worst is this older Mexican man is always saying "dame un riso" . If I had a burning desire to touch a person's hair of another race I would just ask a friend of that race if I could touch theirs. It is kind of sad if an exhibit like this would be someone's only opportunity to touch a black person's natural hair.

I would be scared to go to this and put my hands in a strangers hair anyway because of lice. I have never actually known a black person who has had lice but I hear it is possible.
Originally Posted by adthomas
So if somebody says something like "Why does black hair look rough?." Or "I heard black hair can't grow." You're going to let then say that and not stop to educate them on the matter; so they can continue to sound ignorant without knowing.

"Black" hair has never been see in a good light that's why we have relaxers. What these girls did was give people a little insight so they can stop titling "black "hair as the hair nobody wants and needs.
Originally Posted by BeautyisMiree
My honest reaction is so what. Like you said we and other races have been bending over backwards for generations to make ourselves "presentable" and "acceptable" to white people. Why can't we get past this need for validation? If someone likes my hair great. If they don't then As Rhettt Butler put it, frankly my dear I don't give a damn. I feel no obligation or inclination to be on display while random people fondle my hair because of my blackness. It has a subhuman feel to it. Actually it touches a nerve in reminding me of stories I have read about slaves being put up on auction block and white people coming to look them over touching and inspecting them. For a long time we were only considered 3/5 of a person and counted as possessions alongside the cattle so Why we would volunteer to let ourselves be once again objectified is beyond me.

Now I have a diverse group of friends. Believe it or not several of my white and Asian friends ask me for advice for their hair because they know I research a lot. Just today I was explaining to a lady at work who is white about cowashing and possible natural remedies for her itchy scalp.. I have always said I don't like people touching my hair without asking or doing it repeatedly. but I have never told anyone who asked no except for a few creepy guys at Walmart.
Originally Posted by adthomas
Hair is extraordinarily personal. I can't understand ever asking touch someone's hair. It's not that different from someone asking to touch their boob!
2a medium porous, You can see my wavy tutorials here: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?lis...ZNxhBHSXAW40OQ and my wavy blog is The Wavy Nation http://wavynation.wordpress.com