OT: Dark Girls Documentary Preview

Like Tree3Likes

I think its all good and wonderful that you grew up in a household that emphasized black beauty, where skin color and hair texture was a non-issue and all the adults in your life made sure that you knew you were beautiful. Though my parents never mentioned color or texture in a negative light, they never emphasized the positive either. I guess they didn't feel like they had to. I didn't get anything from home, but I sure got it in school - the negative.

Its not a matter of broadcasting. Actually, I never seen or heard anything like this documentary before. Maybe I'm a sheltered 32-year-old, but not everyone has been drowned in these issues. Also, there are still generations of little girls (and boys) being brought up to believe what "we" went though growing up. When we still have photos of Beyonce being lightened in magazines, we still have a problem.
APL BSL MBL WL HL TBL | porous, fine/medium strands, medium density
My Fotki!
Below: Typical PS bun
I think films like this need to exist because not all instances of colorism are overt and there are people who treat others a certain way without even realizing that they're doing it or why. I went to school with the same group of kids from kindergarten to 6th grade and each and every teacher we had treated the light skinned girls in the classroom differently than everyone else. They always got seated up front, they were always line leader or teacher's helper. When they class was loud and acting up the teacher alway assumed that they were NEVER the one's talking out of turn or whispering when her back was to the class. It was obvious that the teacher saw them as "good", "nice", "well behaved" and "trustworthy" even though they really WEREN't. The teacher hardly ever praised the other girls in the class as much as she praised them, never chose them for any special jobs or tasks, never chose them first when it was time to pass out rewards or treats. Imagine how many of those teachers didn't even realize they were doing that.
Banned
Join Date: Aug 2010
Posts: 337
in some ways i feel it needs to be exposed so that those that have these views can figure out why they do, like the guy who in the vid who said a dark skin girl doesn't look right with him, he wants a light skinned girl with long hair. maybe when people see that they'll see how stupid it sounds and consider changing.
Originally Posted by luvmylocs
I suspect that the guy who made that comment may have issues with his own skin colour. I have met many people who have issues with their colour and they choose to date people with the type of skin tone that they would have liked for themselves. So a lot of times when those people are criticising someone else's skin tone it's because the person that they are criticising reminds them of everything that they hate about themselves.

maybe when people see "dark" girls crying on the video they will really think about the hurt some people feel all because of something like skin tone.
Originally Posted by luvmylocs
I hope so too.


i do want to add that i thought about this and extremely pale white people probably also struggle although i don't know if it's to the same extreme but some of them are willing to tan even though it's hazardous to your health. so acceptance of people regardless of skin tone isn't completely a black thing.

i can't wait to see the documentary.
Originally Posted by luvmylocs
Exactly! I have spent a lot of time around both black people and white people. When I am around certain white women I get so uncomfortable when they start to talk about how much they hate their pale skin. A lot of the ones that I have met spend a great deal of money on fake tan and they spend endless hours under the sunbed to make themselves brown.

One white woman spoke about putting fake tan on her 4 year old daughter because she thought that her daughter would look prettier brown.

The sunbed ages some people really badly but many are more concerned about looking brown. One girl said that she doesn't care about all of the wrinkles the sunbed has given her because she can get botox when she is older. She said that she would rather risk getting skin cancer than walking around looking pale.

I've heard many many white people diss other white people for looking 'too pale'.

I have also met many black people who have issues with their colour. I know of many who bleach to make themselves lighter because they feel that they look prettier when they are lighter. However, while strong bleaching creams are illegal in the UK, sunbeds are not.

As I havent seen the documentary I can't be too critical of it. However, I feel that the clip that I saw only shows one side of the story.
I may not be chocolate complexion but working in an emvironment with lots of nonblacks I am always the dark one and ya know I love being called dark skinned. I love my deep tan complexion...thankfully my sisters and I who are darker than I are very confident in eachothers skin credit due to my parents.

Sent from my HTC Glacier using CurlTalk App
Texture: proud 4a (3c at the nape).
Regimen: co-wash everyday.deep condition, de-tangle and seal once a week.
Current Favs: Treseme Naturals shampoo & conditioner, wide tooth comb, coconut oil, Shea Moisture curling smoothie, ampro clear styling gel .
Protective Style: buns

visit my fashion & culture website: http://www.beautyandthestreetmag.blogspot.com
1. Why must we compare "our" issues to the issues of people in other racial groups? "We should stop talking about colorism in the black community because it's not that big of a deal since everybody knows about it and Indians and Brazilians and white people have it in their communities/society as well." No one person has all of the answers and change will never happen the more people think like that. Should we stop bringing social issues to light because they still exist and persist? Ever think that maybe these issues are still prevalent because we don't have enough people who are willing to fight it, they are encouraged to be silenced by people that are sick and tired of dealing/seeing the issue resurface, or their research remains in the confines of academe?

2. The preview may not have presented any solutions, but who's to say the documentary in its entirety won't?
Great spirits have always encountered violent opposition from mediocre minds

-Albert Einstein
Discounts:iHerb: EZA283 for $5 off!, OCO522 for $10 off first purchase | Komaza Care Referral Code: J5Q362VG
1. Why must we compare "our" issues to the issues of people in other racial groups? "We should stop talking about colorism in the black community because it's not that big of a deal since everybody knows about it and Indians and Brazilians and white people have it in their communities/society as well." No one person has all of the answers and change will never happen the more people think like that. Should we stop bringing social issues to light because they still exist and persist? Ever think that maybe these issues are still prevalent because we don't have enough people who are willing to fight it, they are encouraged to be silenced by people that are sick and tired of dealing/seeing the issue resurface, or their research remains in the confines of academe?

2. The preview may not have presented any solutions, but who's to say the documentary in its entirety won't?
Originally Posted by CocoT
To all the above: THANK YOU!! That's what I'm saying! Why do some people find this hard to understand? See even people in our own black (or natural hair board) community are ignoring the issue because "people already know"....and its not a big deal or there are no solutions being presented. Look at the bigger picture.


LITTLE JOEY HAS A SIBLING ON THE WAY!
I think its all good and wonderful that you grew up in a household that emphasized black beauty, where skin color and hair texture was a non-issue and all the adults in your life made sure that you knew you were beautiful. Though my parents never mentioned color or texture in a negative light, they never emphasized the positive either. I guess they didn't feel like they had to. I didn't get anything from home, but I sure got it in school - the negative.

Its not a matter of broadcasting. Actually, I never seen or heard anything like this documentary before. Maybe I'm a sheltered 32-year-old, but not everyone has been drowned in these issues. Also, there are still generations of little girls (and boys) being brought up to believe what "we" went though growing up. When we still have photos of Beyonce being lightened in magazines, we still have a problem.
Originally Posted by greenandchic
Same here. I never heard anything about it until this documentary came out. I had no idea that this was a huge thing happening everywhere. I thought the kids I dealt with were just buttholes...and everybody else wasn't like that. oops


LITTLE JOEY HAS A SIBLING ON THE WAY!
Banned
Join Date: Aug 2010
Posts: 337
1. Why must we compare "our" issues to the issues of people in other racial groups?
Originally Posted by CocoT
I think that it is important to remind people that black people are not the only ones with issues in their community.

I was once working with a white Irish girl who only dated black men. Because she dated black men she had a strong interest in Africa so everytime she saw a black person she would ask if their parents were from Africa. She said that when she asked Caribbean women that question they would get angry at her. She said they seemed to be offended that she thought that they were African. She said that the Caribbean women would often proceed to diss Africans telling her everything they disliked about Africans. After telling me that story she said: "I don't understand why they are so angry at white people for slavery if they hate Africans. If they hate Africa so much they should be thanking white people for slavery"

When she said that I got so angry. I reminded her of the fact that there has been a great deal of conflict between Irish and English people. I reminded her that she was the one who told me that when her parents first came to London from Ireland there were signs on the pubs that said: 'no Blacks, no Dogs, no Irish'. I emphasised the fact that black people are not the only people who have issues in their community. She apologised and agreed that black people are not the only ones who have issues. She admitted that sometimes she forgets that white people have issues too because she sees so many black people highlighting their issues.
... my mule is so pretty... imma just sit over here and hold it.

*subscribed*
1. Why must we compare "our" issues to the issues of people in other racial groups?
Originally Posted by CocoT
I think that it is important to remind people that black people are not the only ones with issues in their community.

I was once working with a white Irish girl who only dated black men. Because she dated black men she had a strong interest in Africa so everytime she saw a black person she would ask if their parents were from Africa. She said that when she asked Caribbean women that question they would get angry at her. She said they seemed to be offended that she thought that they were African. She said that the Caribbean women would often proceed to diss Africans telling her everything they disliked about Africans. After telling me that story she said: "I don't understand why they are so angry at white people for slavery if they hate Africans. If they hate Africa so much they should be thanking white people for slavery"

When she said that I got so angry. I reminded her of the fact that there has been a great deal of conflict between Irish and English people. I reminded her that she was the one who told me that when her parents first came to London from Ireland there were signs on the pubs that said: 'no Blacks, no Dogs, no Irish'. I emphasised the fact that black people are not the only people who have issues in their community. She apologised and agreed that black people are not the only ones who have issues. She admitted that sometimes she forgets that white people have issues too because she sees so many black people highlighting their issues.
Originally Posted by AlikaIssa
Now this I could never understand. If you go back, no matter how far it is, you will find somebody in your family came from Africa. My dad is from the Caribbean, but he is still BLACK. The difference between Afro-Caribbean and African American is basically means after your ancestors were taken from Africa, one was dropped in St. Lucia (or where have you) and one was dropped off in America. lol No reason you should be offended.


LITTLE JOEY HAS A SIBLING ON THE WAY!
... my mule is so pretty... imma just sit over here and hold it.

*subscribed*
Originally Posted by keenylicious
hahahaaahahhahah


LITTLE JOEY HAS A SIBLING ON THE WAY!
1. Why must we compare "our" issues to the issues of people in other racial groups?
Originally Posted by CocoT
I think that it is important to remind people that black people are not the only ones with issues in their community.

I was once working with a white Irish girl who only dated black men. Because she dated black men she had a strong interest in Africa so everytime she saw a black person she would ask if their parents were from Africa. She said that when she asked Caribbean women that question they would get angry at her. She said they seemed to be offended that she thought that they were African. She said that the Caribbean women would often proceed to diss Africans telling her everything they disliked about Africans. After telling me that story she said: "I don't understand why they are so angry at white people for slavery if they hate Africans. If they hate Africa so much they should be thanking white people for slavery"

When she said that I got so angry. I reminded her of the fact that there has been a great deal of conflict between Irish and English people. I reminded her that she was the one who told me that when her parents first came to London from Ireland there were signs on the pubs that said: 'no Blacks, no Dogs, no Irish'. I emphasised the fact that black people are not the only people who have issues in their community. She apologised and agreed that black people are not the only ones who have issues. She admitted that sometimes she forgets that white people have issues too because she sees so many black people highlighting their issues.
Originally Posted by AlikaIssa
Who said that there aren't any issues in other cultures/communities/societies? But why is it that whenever a dialogue starts to occur about issues within our the black community, people want to rebuttal by saying "This group has the same issues too". Okay, I never said they didn't. But you know what, I'm not a part of that community. And just like a white/hispanic/indian/etc person can't come tell the black community what to do to fix their issues, I can't go to those communities and tell them what to do about their issues.

And wow at the last bolded. I agree that her statement was ignorant but um...you got mad at her because she felt some type of way about black Caribbeans disliking Africans? And what did telling her that Irish and English people have issues too have to do with that? Your story is kind of confusing me. There's no need to derail the thread though. But your story speaks to my argument, which is that black peoples issues are relevant to black people. Black people are more equipped to address black people's issues. That's not to say that they don't matter in the greater context of society (BECAUSE THEY DO), but if we're battling each other then how can we expect for things such as institutional and covert racism, discrimination, and etc, to be remedied? Its a LOT to work on but should we just give up and cease all dialogue because you're tired of it?
Great spirits have always encountered violent opposition from mediocre minds

-Albert Einstein
Discounts:iHerb: EZA283 for $5 off!, OCO522 for $10 off first purchase | Komaza Care Referral Code: J5Q362VG
1. Why must we compare "our" issues to the issues of people in other racial groups?
Originally Posted by CocoT
I think that it is important to remind people that black people are not the only ones with issues in their community.

I was once working with a white Irish girl who only dated black men. Because she dated black men she had a strong interest in Africa so everytime she saw a black person she would ask if their parents were from Africa. She said that when she asked Caribbean women that question they would get angry at her. She said they seemed to be offended that she thought that they were African. She said that the Caribbean women would often proceed to diss Africans telling her everything they disliked about Africans. After telling me that story she said: "I don't understand why they are so angry at white people for slavery if they hate Africans. If they hate Africa so much they should be thanking white people for slavery"

When she said that I got so angry. I reminded her of the fact that there has been a great deal of conflict between Irish and English people. I reminded her that she was the one who told me that when her parents first came to London from Ireland there were signs on the pubs that said: 'no Blacks, no Dogs, no Irish'. I emphasised the fact that black people are not the only people who have issues in their community. She apologised and agreed that black people are not the only ones who have issues. She admitted that sometimes she forgets that white people have issues too because she sees so many black people highlighting their issues.
Originally Posted by AlikaIssa
Now this I could never understand. If you go back, no matter how far it is, you will find somebody in your family came from Africa. My dad is from the Caribbean, but he is still BLACK. The difference between Afro-Caribbean and African American is basically means after your ancestors were taken from Africa, one was dropped in St. Lucia (or where have you) and one was dropped off in America. lol No reason you should be offended.
Originally Posted by tbabyy
Right. If anything she should have been more mad at those Caribbean women
Great spirits have always encountered violent opposition from mediocre minds

-Albert Einstein
Discounts:iHerb: EZA283 for $5 off!, OCO522 for $10 off first purchase | Komaza Care Referral Code: J5Q362VG
1. Why must we compare "our" issues to the issues of people in other racial groups?
Originally Posted by CocoT
I think that it is important to remind people that black people are not the only ones with issues in their community.

I was once working with a white Irish girl who only dated black men. Because she dated black men she had a strong interest in Africa so everytime she saw a black person she would ask if their parents were from Africa. She said that when she asked Caribbean women that question they would get angry at her. She said they seemed to be offended that she thought that they were African. She said that the Caribbean women would often proceed to diss Africans telling her everything they disliked about Africans. After telling me that story she said: "I don't understand why they are so angry at white people for slavery if they hate Africans. If they hate Africa so much they should be thanking white people for slavery"

When she said that I got so angry. I reminded her of the fact that there has been a great deal of conflict between Irish and English people. I reminded her that she was the one who told me that when her parents first came to London from Ireland there were signs on the pubs that said: 'no Blacks, no Dogs, no Irish'. I emphasised the fact that black people are not the only people who have issues in their community. She apologised and agreed that black people are not the only ones who have issues. She admitted that sometimes she forgets that white people have issues too because she sees so many black people highlighting their issues.
Originally Posted by AlikaIssa
Who said that there aren't any issues in other cultures/communities/societies? But why is it that whenever a dialogue starts to occur about issues within our the black community, people want to rebuttal by saying "This group has the same issues too". Okay, I never said they didn't. But you know what, I'm not a part of that community. And just like a white/hispanic/indian/etc person can't come tell the black community what to do to fix their issues, I can't go to those communities and tell them what to do about their issues.

And wow at the last bolded. I agree that her statement was ignorant but um...you got mad at her because she felt some type of way about black Caribbeans disliking Africans? And what did telling her that Irish and English people have issues too have to do with that? Your story is kind of confusing me. There's no need to derail the thread though. But your story speaks to my argument, which is that black peoples issues are relevant to black people. Black people are more equipped to address black people's issues. That's not to say that they don't matter in the greater context of society (BECAUSE THEY DO), but if we're battling each other then how can we expect for things such as institutional and covert racism, discrimination, and etc, to be remedied? Its a LOT to work on but should we just give up and cease all dialogue because you're tired of it?
Originally Posted by CocoT
I think she got mad at her for what she said about slavery.

But I do agree with what you are saying. Why can't we talk about our problems? Address OUR problems? So what if some other group has issues thats not about us? We can't complain about the problems within the black community? To fix them we have to bring them light...if we see nothing is being done about it, then we continue to bring it to light over and over again until we see that something must be done about it. I mean that School Daze came out in 1988, 3 yrs before I was born....it's 2011 and we still having these issues....hello....WAAAAAAAAAAAAAKE UUUUUUUUUUUUUUP!!!!!!


LITTLE JOEY HAS A SIBLING ON THE WAY!
I think that movies like this do serve a purpose. Like many of you have pointed out they highlight the issue which is especially important for people who are unaware of how hurtful their comments are. When mothers tell their children that they would be prettier if they were lighter I doubt that they really considered the long term effects. This movie highlights exactly what can and probably will happen when we perpetuate ignorance and should serve as a wake up call for many.

Also it is unfair to say that we are not seeing the positivity that comes out of movies like this. Only when we are made aware of an issue can we change and like I have said before many are unaware of the issue. A few years ago things were much worse with the brown paper bag test etc and with time things are slowly bettering. I am a young woman and because I have been made aware of this problem I have vowed to never be that ignorant and to try my best to raise my children to love themselves no matter what they look like and to love others as well. More and more persons in my genertaion are changing and we will then spread our positivity to the next generation and maybe just maybe we shall solve this issue. So even if we don't see the change in this generation we might see it in the next or the one after that and even if it takes a lifetime we can't stop trying.

During the abolition of slavery many black persons did not want to get involved as they believed that nothing would ever change but it did. And it took years of people talking about it before someone could find a solution. We might not have the solution now but if we educate enough people I believe that we are a smart enough people to figure it out.

Also, I do not buy into the story that by highlighting our issues the "others" will have a reason to talk about us. Firstly ignorant people will talk regardless. Secondly, this is like saying that people should not demonstrate for things like equality of women simply because we have been downtrodden for so long. By talking about it we are only highlighting how weak we are and because we have no revolutionary ideas like becoming lesbians until men get a clue we should simply be quiet. This is an extreme but seriously I'm a firm believer in talking something to death until the message reaches the far corners and people do something about it.


err.. nevermind... i my memory is slipping... *googles ways to improve memory*
Yea I'm gonna take it there: We're all aware of slavery. Well that period of time was excrutiatingly long and painful, but throughout that period and to the civil rights era there were black people that wanted change and because of their diligence, we have come quite a ways. Now if they had the mindset that a few of you have shown in this thread, where would we be if civil rights activists and people who were sick and tired of being sick and tired just gave up because they couldn't see the light at the end of the tunnel? That's a serious question.

I not only disagree with that mindset, but I also think it's wrong. I'll leave it at that.
Great spirits have always encountered violent opposition from mediocre minds

-Albert Einstein
Discounts:iHerb: EZA283 for $5 off!, OCO522 for $10 off first purchase | Komaza Care Referral Code: J5Q362VG
There is no easy solution. You can't invent a vaccine for colorism immunity. Social change is a slow, gradual process. Often time this process begins with a conversation. This film will do just that. It doesn't matter if it is "nothing new". How will people come up with solutions if we all refuse to discuss and expose?

If adult black women are being brought to tears over this preview, they are obviously discussing something very painful. This pain won't go away if we just stay quite. Conversations need to happen... Between mothers, daughters, fathers and brothers.

Kudos to them for their efforts.
Banned
Join Date: Aug 2010
Posts: 337

Who said that there aren't any issues in other cultures/communities/societies?
Originally Posted by CocoT
I know you didn't say that. The girl I was speaking to had initially implied that black people were the only ones with issues. That was the reason why I included that sentence.

you got mad at her because she felt some type of way about black Caribbeans disliking Africans?
Originally Posted by CocoT

No, I got mad because she said that black people should be thanking white people for slavery.

And what did telling her that Irish and English people have issues too have to do with that?
Originally Posted by CocoT
She had mentioned that white people didn't hate each other the way that black people do. I left that out of my other post by mistake. She said a lot of other stuff and so did I. But like u said if I go into too much detail it will completely derail the thread.
Yea I'm gonna take it there: We're all aware of slavery. Well that period of time was excrutiatingly long and painful, but throughout that period and to the civil rights era there were black people that wanted change and because of their diligence, we have come quite a ways. Now if they had the mindset that a few of you have shown in this thread, where would we be if civil rights activists and people who were sick and tired of being sick and tired just gave up because they couldn't see the light at the end of the tunnel? That's a serious question.

I not only disagree with that mindset, but I also think it's wrong. I'll leave it at that.
Originally Posted by CocoT

PLEASE PREACH!

Go here: slaves knew slavery was wrong, so those people who said yea we know slavery wrong but when you have a solution, get at me otherwise stop talking about it. hahaha oook!


Also, I do not buy into the story that by highlighting our issues the "others" will have a reason to talk about us. Firstly ignorant people will talk regardless. Secondly, this is like saying that people should not demonstrate for things like equality of women simply because we have been downtrodden for so long. By talking about it we are only highlighting how weak we are and because we have no revolutionary ideas like becoming lesbians until men get a clue we should simply be quiet. This is an extreme but seriously I'm a firm believer in talking something to death until the message reaches the far corners and people do something about it.
Originally Posted by naturallychelsea
Shoot, change didn't come from people being quiet. Since when are Black people known for being quiet lol


LITTLE JOEY HAS A SIBLING ON THE WAY!

Trending Topics


Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On



All times are GMT -6. The time now is 08:15 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2011 NaturallyCurly.com