Does Hair Typing really work?

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I use to come here for any new ideas or tips (or products) that work for my particular hair texture(not anymore since the new change). Now I think it's nothing wrong with hair typing simply because it assists in learning more about how to care/manage your hair. Also typically women with my same hair type use similar products and techniques that other hair types can't. So maybe hair typing doesn't work for people who have close hair textures(3a 3b) or (4b/4c) but when you're going from 4a to 4c that is an OBVIOUS difference, or 3a to 3c. So in that respect I think hair typing does work.

I think that as long as you look at hair typing as a means to assist in styling or product usage, it's ok. The problem lies when people want to exclude others of information(EVEN if it just may work on another hair type) just because they don't have the same hair type(hair type discrimination). I think we should have the option of hair typing(for learning product usage and styling tips), but this option should be for women with AND without the hair type. This really does help, and I admit, if it weren't for this, I would have NEVER found women with my hair type and had the opportunity to learn style techniques as well as hair products and recipes that actually worked for me. I hated experimenting because the woman that I was learning from had hair totally different texture than mine, and MOST of the products didn't work.
I credit the hair typing system for helping me grow my natural hair to midback length, before then I always had shoulder length hair, trying to experiment.

Again I don't think a person should be excluded from asking or learning about ANY hair type, but at the same time we should have options.

What do you all think??? Does the hair typing system help you??
Personally I think the only usefulness I get from hair typing in that it helps teach people deal with shrinkage issues because the tighter the pattern the more the shrinkage. I think people with tighter patterns tend to bemore into stretched styles but then plenty of them only wash and go or alternate and plenty of loosers do braid out twist outs.

As far as products hair typing hasn't helped me one bit. Supposedly according to what I have read my hair likes puddings and thick butters but really my hair hates them except a little shea on the ends. While coily my strands are fine. I'm also protein sensitive and low porosity which have nothing to do with curl pattern.

I don't think anyone is excluded from info on this site because we are free to go into any section and post. It's just not everyone is interested in doing that. Honestly, I have recently been wondering why CN and NC are even two different sites because over the last few months the content has become nearly identical. I see one post an article on site or FB ten the other post the same the next day or so. I think both need more content that is specific only to that site.

Last edited by adthomas; 10-14-2014 at 11:25 PM.
As far as the whole hair typing and products, experimentation is definitely the key. Lately, products geared towards wavy hair work just fine for me as opposed to the ungodly amount of money I was spending on "kinky-coily" and "natural hair" products.
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Oils: olive, argan, and Jamaican Black castor oils
As far as the whole hair typing and products, experimentation is definitely the key. Lately, products geared towards wavy hair work just fine for me as opposed to the ungodly amount of money I was spending on "kinky-coily" and "natural hair" products.
Originally Posted by SweetRellie
Marketing and racial stereotypes are a lot to blame.

When I joined this site first time round people were still blinkered by that. So you would get people wondering if they had type 4 why hair butters weren't working and others with type 3 hair who couldn't understand why gel alone wasn't working.

Eventually people cottoned on to the idea of product ingredients, hair properties and environment being other factors in getting healthly hair.

Funny thing is some people had already been forced to experiment. Some Black people outside North America and Africa were use to having to try products not aimed at them, and some White people had used products aimed at Black people. One of my sisters' had a White woman she shared with at university (college ) use her shampoo and conditioner because she run out of her own. This woman decided it couldn't be much different and than discovered she preferred the result so went off to buy shampoo and conditioner marketed at Black people.

I personally use products aimed at any hair type or race as long as they work for my hair and have done since I first joined this site in 2000. However this site has opened by eyes to more products some of which I would't have considered.

I left the first time because when I discovered a cheap product "aimed" at type 2s worked well for me while heavy butters and proteins didn't, and reported this I was shouted down. Funnily the product was never marketed at type 2s by the maker/seller as they did no marketing for it. The product became popular due to this site and YouTube.
As far as the whole hair typing and products, experimentation is definitely the key. Lately, products geared towards wavy hair work just fine for me as opposed to the ungodly amount of money I was spending on "kinky-coily" and "natural hair" products.
Originally Posted by SweetRellie
Marketing and racial stereotypes are a lot to blame.

When I joined this site first time round people were still blinkered by that. So you would get people wondering if they had type 4 why hair butters weren't working and others with type 3 hair who couldn't understand why gel alone wasn't working.

Eventually people cottoned on to the idea of product ingredients, hair properties and environment being other factors in getting healthly hair.

Funny thing is some people had already been forced to experiment. Some Black people outside North America and Africa were use to having to try products not aimed at them, and some White people had used products aimed at Black people. One of my sisters' had a White woman she shared with at university (college ) use her shampoo and conditioner because she run out of her own. This woman decided it couldn't be much different and than discovered she preferred the result so went off to buy shampoo and conditioner marketed at Black people.

I personally use products aimed at any hair type or race as long as they work for my hair and have done since I first joined this site in 2000. However this site has opened by eyes to more products some of which I would't have considered.

I left the first time because when I discovered a cheap product "aimed" at type 2s worked well for me while heavy butters and proteins didn't, and reported this I was shouted down. Funnily the product was never marketed at type 2s by the maker/seller as they did no marketing for it. The product became popular due to this site and YouTube.
Originally Posted by Blueblood

I hear your point, but I've been experimenting my entire life with having natural hair(not a new natural here) using products geared toward people with straight or wavy hair, and they NEVER worked for me. ONLY (if they were naturally made) and even then I didn't know(till the hair typing system) that leaving the conditioner in for 1hr would work for me(since the bottle always said 10min i did that) I'm sure the looser your curl the less you can leave it in. My problem(with most type 4s) was ALWAYS with dryness(which caused breakage). Regardless of having porous hair or not(and I have low porosity fyi). That is why i added (TIPS) on that, because the tips that my particular type has will work for me over someone without my hair type. Not to mention WHICH conditioner would work BEST(even if all of the worked, one would be more effective which would mean less time in your hair as well.)

I do agree that the hair system isn't the problem. It's just people (including whites) are STILL living in the past of "good hair" and the looser the curl the more white you are. So the system isn't the problem, the problem is how people apply it to daily life and how white supremacy may use it in order to ostracize groups of people by associating negative connotations to curl patterns which don't look like "white people hair"(predominately wavy or straight hair). To me that is the problem. And people that have this mindset often times(in my opinion) feel hair typing as offensive (instead of focusing on the real culprits(racist whites who are in power) who allow racist and negative connotations about coily hair to thrive throughout mainstream media. If they weren't offended they would careless whether it was present or not. We should be offended by the negative connotations thriving in mainstream, not the hair typing system.

Last edited by MIA1487; 10-14-2014 at 09:06 PM.
I hear your point, but I've been experimenting my entire life with having natural hair(not a new natural here) using products geared toward people with straight or wavy hair, and they NEVER worked for me. ONLY (if they were naturally made) and even then I didn't know(till the hair typing system) that leaving the conditioner in for 1hr would work for me(since the bottle always said 10min i did that) I'm sure the looser your curl the less you can leave it in. My problem(with most type 4s) was ALWAYS with dryness(which caused breakage). Regardless of having porous hair or not(and I have low porosity fyi). That is why i added (TIPS) on that, because the tips that my particular type has will work for me over someone without my hair type. Not to mention WHICH conditioner would work BEST(even if all of the worked, one would be more effective which would mean less time in your hair as well.)

I do agree that the hair system isn't the problem. It's just people (including whites) are STILL living in the past of "good hair" and the looser the curl the more white you are. So the system isn't the problem, the problem is how people apply it to daily life and how white supremacy may use it in order to ostracize groups of people by associating negative connotations to curl patterns which don't look like "white people hair"(predominately wavy or straight hair). To me that is the problem. And people that have this mindset often times(in my opinion) feel hair typing as offensive (instead of focusing on the real culprits(racist whites who are in power) who allow racist and negative connotations about coily hair to thrive throughout mainstream media. If they weren't offended they would careless whether it was present or not. We should be offended by the negative connotations thriving in mainstream, not the hair typing system.
Originally Posted by MIA1487
I don't see the connection between whether hair typing helps to figure out what works for your hair and racism/negative perception of type 4 natural hair. Apples and oranges imo. Wouldn't you be able to ask a 2 the very same question of whether hair typing works for them??. If someone is trying to care for their natural type 4 I would think they have or are at least are trying to embrace it rather than relax which would give them that straight hair. I think it's two different issues. I believe there are those who can use the what is typically handed to type 4 as tips and benefit and those who can't because having the same curl pattern doesn't make two heads exactly alike.How long I leave a conditioner in depends on what kind of conditioner it is. Rinse outs a few minutes. DC is 45 minutes max or I get overconditioned. I slept with dc a few times and my hair was mushy and I said I'd never do it again. I like some products marketed to me a type 4 but I overwhelmingly prefer conditioners not marketed to type 4s and blacks. In fact I have yet to find an "ethnic" rinse out conditioner or deep conditioner my hair likes. Def none of the SM..

btw I'm looking for advice for alternative uses for an almost full jar of CR almond Jai twister butter. for me it equals greasy and dry as a moisturizer styler.
During my transitioning journey, I was very interested in learning my hairtype. After I learned what my hairtype is, I then started becoming fixated with buying products that would say that they were for a specific curltype. However, I came to learn through trial and error, that I can successfully use products that women with other curl types are able to use too. I have simply learned to go by what my hair responds best to. Knowing ones hairtype is a good thing to know. But, it is not what I honestly go by when it comes to picking out hair products. I check out the ingredients and as many reviews as I can about a product before I actually buy it.

I don't know of any alternative uses for the CRN Almond Jai Twisting Butter as I currently use it as a moisturizer+styling aid myself. I do have to reapply it throughout the week, but that is normal for my hair, when it comes to most products anyways. You can always put it for swap. Or, for a possible alternative to the CRN Almond Jai Twisting Butter, you can try the Bekura Beauty (formerly known as B.A.S.K.) Palm Tapioca Deluxe Hair Cream. I am not sure if you have tried this product or not, but it is a product that doubles as both a moisturizer and styling aid. Hope this info helps!
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Shea Moisture Curl & Shine Shampoo
Shea Moisture Curl & Shine Conditioner
Carol's Daughter Hair Milk Cleansing Conditioner
Carol's Daughter Hair Milk Original Leave-In Moisturizer
Carol's Daughter Hair Milk Refresher Spray
Marula Oil
Camille Rose Naturals Curl Maker
Camille Rose Naturals Curlaide Moisture Butter
Camille Rose Naturals Almond Jai Twisting Butter

Last edited by Reservechic; 10-16-2014 at 11:45 AM.
I'm a Type 2, and reading about what products work for other 2s has been helpful, but I'll try just about anything once. Through doing so, I learned that KC doesn't work for me; nor does Murray's Superior Hair Pomade. But lots of 2 stuff that other people like doesn't work either, so I try to be flexible.

I guess I'm not sure if this post is about the usefulness of learning from others with similar hair, or about negative connotations associated with curls. Because I'm always trying hard to get more curl.

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During my transitioning journey, I was very interested in learning my hairtype. After I learned what my hairtype is, I then started becoming fixated with buying products that would say that they were for a specific curltype. However, I came to learn through trial and error, that I can successfully use products that women with other curl types are able to use too. I have simply learned to go by what my hair responds best to. Knowing ones hairtype is a good thing to know. But, it is not what I honestly go by when it comes to picking out hair products. I check out the ingredients and as many reviews as I can about a product before I actually buy it.

I don't know of any alternative uses for the CRN Almond Jai Twisting Butter as I currently use it as a moisturizer+styling aid myself. I do have to reapply it throughout the week, but that is normal for my hair, when it comes to most products anyways. For a possible alternative to the CRN Almond Jai Twisting Butter, you can try the Bekura Beauty (formerly known as B.A.S.K.) Palm Tapioca Deluxe Hair Cream. I am not sure if you have tried this product or not, but it is a product that doubles as both a moisturizer and styling aid. Hope this info helps!
Originally Posted by Reservechic

Agreed Hair typing does help..but again it's always good to venture out and explore other hair types because sometimes they may have good tips.
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I'm a Type 2, and reading about what products work for other 2s has been helpful, but I'll try just about anything once. Through doing so, I learned that KC doesn't work for me; nor does Murray's Superior Hair Pomade. But lots of 2 stuff that other people like doesn't work either, so I try to be flexible.

I guess I'm not sure if this post is about the usefulness of learning from others with similar hair, or about negative connotations associated with curls. Because I'm always trying hard to get more curl.
Originally Posted by claudine191

No it's not about negative connotations of curls, but I've noticed people that are typically against hair typing, aren't really against the "typing" per say, but how people misuse this information to create negative connotations around it(<<<and that is what people should be upset about, not about the typing system)

Also I agree with you, i think the hair typing system does work, for products and style tips(especially style tips)...but it is good to sometimes venture to other types to see the products or style tips they use as well. Even though typically it may not work, sometimes you may come across some that actually do, I know I have. My point is the typing system IS helpful in my opinion. But people should have the option to refer back to info from others with their hairtype if they choose to.
Oh, yes.

I just wish there was a way to try a new product without having to buy a whole new jar or bottle or tub of it. Correspondingly, I wish I still had the money I spent on a lot of failed "Hey, maybe this will work!" attempts.
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@Mia1487 there is more than one hair typing system. The generic one used generally on this site provides little information about your different hair properties.

Also no hair typing system can help you handle the environment you live in. Other curlies regardless of their curl type can give you information on how to deal with humidity and hard water especially if they share some of your other hair properties like porosity and issues with ingredients.

I wrote a longer post before in answer to you saying products for straight and wavy hair don't work for you but I got interrupted so didn't post it.

All I can really say in answer to that is it's more about product ingredients that suit the many different properties of your hair and your environment.

All but one of the rinse out conditioners I have aren't marketed at Black people or those with any type of curl. Yet I brought them and repurchased them because they work. They were also cheaper than the equivalent products with similar ingredients marketed at Black people. On the other hand the gel I use most often is marketed at Black people. There are similar gels marketed at White people but this is cheaper.
I'm a Type 2, and reading about what products work for other 2s has been helpful, but I'll try just about anything once. Through doing so, I learned that KC doesn't work for me; nor does Murray's Superior Hair Pomade. But lots of 2 stuff that other people like doesn't work either, so I try to be flexible.

I guess I'm not sure if this post is about the usefulness of learning from others with similar hair, or about negative connotations associated with curls. Because I'm always trying hard to get more curl.
Originally Posted by claudine191

No it's not about negative connotations of curls, but I've noticed people that are typically against hair typing, aren't really against the "typing" per say, but how people misuse this information to create negative connotations around it(<<<and that is what people should be upset about, not about the typing system)

Also I agree with you, i think the hair typing system does work, for products and style tips(especially style tips)...but it is good to sometimes venture to other types to see the products or style tips they use as well. Even though typically it may not work, sometimes you may come across some that actually do, I know I have. My point is the typing system IS helpful in my opinion. But people should have the option to refer back to info from others with their hairtype if they choose to.
Originally Posted by MIA1487
Correct me if I'm wrong. Are you saying you think some people don't like hair typing because they don't like being called a type 4 because they associate 4 with being an undesireable hair type? If that's it then I totally agree. I stopped responding to hair type questions a ,ong time ago because some people not all would send a picture and if the responses were type 4 they would continue to send pictures hoping to get a different response of type 3. How about in this light? how about close up? It was annoying. my hair is mostly 4 and I love the natural volume I get.
Oh, yes.

I just wish there was a way to try a new product without having to buy a whole new jar or bottle or tub of it. Correspondingly, I wish I still had the money I spent on a lot of failed "Hey, maybe this will work!" attempts.
Originally Posted by claudine191
I think we all would like some of that money back lol. I wish everything came in samples... Free samples!
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Oils: olive, argan, and Jamaican Black castor oils
I don't think typing helps at all on how you should treat your curls. I am definitely a 2, no matter my inner wishes of being a 3 lol, and I.can get away with using a lot of heavy ingredients such as shea butter. At the beginning my hair.was getting weighted down. But I guess its overall health improved as I can get away with a lot. Maybe its coarse nature is my advantage along with a higher porosity that I haven't get rid off yet as it seems.
So as being said two heads while they share same type they are never the same. Now that I think of it my low dews help me on heavy ingredients, I need them kinda. If I had access I would try products marketed for a 4 curly because.... you never know.

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During my transitioning journey, I was very interested in learning my hairtype. After I learned what my hairtype is, I then started becoming fixated with buying products that would say that they were for a specific curltype. However, I came to learn through trial and error, that I can successfully use products that women with other curl types are able to use too. I have simply learned to go by what my hair responds best to. Knowing ones hairtype is a good thing to know. But, it is not what I honestly go by when it comes to picking out hair products. I check out the ingredients and as many reviews as I can about a product before I actually buy it.

I don't know of any alternative uses for the CRN Almond Jai Twisting Butter as I currently use it as a moisturizer+styling aid myself. I do have to reapply it throughout the week, but that is normal for my hair, when it comes to most products anyways. You can always put it for swap. Or, for a possible alternative to the CRN Almond Jai Twisting Butter, you can try the Bekura Beauty (formerly known as B.A.S.K.) Palm Tapioca Deluxe Hair Cream. I am not sure if you have tried this product or not, but it is a product that doubles as both a moisturizer and styling aid. Hope this info helps!
Originally Posted by Reservechic
Thanks. I think I'm going to dry to mix it in my dc's and prepoo. That is what I'm doing with an Oyin conditioner. I think my problem with the jai is the almond milk. I think that's protein. I might give it someone I know but I'm too lazy to promise to ship something on swap. I see your 3b loves this butter and my 4a does not.
Also typically women with my same hair type use similar products and techniques that other hair types can't. So maybe hair typing doesn't work for people who have close hair textures(3a 3b) or (4b/4c) but when you're going from 4a to 4c that is an OBVIOUS difference, or 3a to 3c. So in that respect I think hair typing does work.

The problem lies when people want to exclude others of information(EVEN if it just may work on another hair type) just because they don't have the same hair type(hair type discrimination). I think we should have the option of hair typing(for learning product usage and styling tips), but this option should be for women with AND without the hair type. This really does help, and I admit, if it weren't for this, I would have NEVER found women with my hair type and had the opportunity to learn style techniques as well as hair products and recipes that actually worked for me. I hated experimenting because the woman that I was learning from had hair totally different texture than mine, and MOST of the products didn't work.

What do you all think??? Does the hair typing system help you??
Originally Posted by MIA1487
This doesn't make sense to me. You say people shouldn't be excluded because of their hair type, but then you are encouraging excluding learning from people with a different hair type because you say it doesn't work. Just because in your experience learning from a different hair type didn't work, doesn't mean it's like that for everybody.

A. Hair type is pretty useless, it just classifies your type of curl, that's it.

B. Porosity, hair thickness, hair length, water quality, and previous damage all play a HUGE role in what products we use and how we use them. Just because I have type 2c or 3a hair doesn't mean that I should be following a 2c or 3a fine haired wavy with low porosity hair. Bad news, been there done that. (I'm coarse haired with high porosity)

C. Preference of how you think your hair should feel is another factor. I like my hair clean and voluminous, but 2a/3c Jane Doe over yonder likes hers covered in oil and matted down, because it helps with flyaways. Exaggerated example, but you get my drift.

Hair is hair and will like and hate things based on the individual's unique make up and water quality.
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Last edited by sixelamy; 10-16-2014 at 12:59 PM.
Speaking strictly for myself and with my experiences over the past 6 years of being natural, the hair typing system never worked for me as far as helping to choose products. As a new natural I fell in to the trap of trying everything and spending $35-$50 per product in search of "hair like hers" because she is/was "my same hair type". Unfortunately, it took me waaaay too long to figure out that my hair isn't like anyone's hair and I had to just start from scratch with products.

I say I'm mostly 4a with patches of 4b in my front edges by my ears and 3c in the very top of my head, and a small patch in the middle of the back of my head, so nothing was completely working for me. My hair likes things that it's not supposed to like....like silicones and all of that stuff, so it was hard for me to try to get a handle on what I "should" be using according to the natural community. I started experimenting with cheaper products, and my hair loved it, so now I have a few products that I stick with because they give me the best results, not because the hair typing system worked for me.
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[/QUOTE]
Again I don't think a person should be excluded from asking or learning about ANY hair type, but at the same time we should have options.

What do you all think??? Does the hair typing system help you??[/QUOTE]
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I think it works for the reasons you stated as it definitely makes it easier to get support for specific hair-type issues, but I haven't specifically seen anyone say or imply that they didn't want to respond or help another poster because their hair was not the same--- most of the time people seem to offer up helpful suggestions regardless of their own hair-type or the posters---


but, I hope you haven't personally felt someone excluded you from a conversation because of hair differences, because that would be a bit strange especially in an open forum like this--


But, as far as general information goes it is very helpful as most people post specific questions in the categories related to the type they are asking about, whether for themselves or a relative or spouse, etc... so, I do think it has very specific usefulness.
'Poo: Aubrey Organics or Suave Clarifying
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Again I don't think a person should be excluded from asking or learning about ANY hair type, but at the same time we should have options.

What do you all think??? Does the hair typing system help you??[/QUOTE]
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I think it works for the reasons you stated as it definitely makes it easier to get support for specific hair-type issues, but I haven't specifically seen anyone say or imply that they didn't want to respond or help another poster because their hair was not the same--- most of the time people seem to offer up helpful suggestions regardless of their own hair-type or the posters---


but, I hope you haven't personally felt someone excluded you from a conversation because of hair differences, because that would be a bit strange especially in an open forum like this--


But, as far as general information goes it is very helpful as most people post specific questions in the categories related to the type they are asking about, whether for themselves or a relative or spouse, etc... so, I do think it has very specific usefulness.[/QUOTE]

I have seen people's questions go unanwsered. I think there are a variety of reasons. Some people get upset when they see a large number of views and no responses and quit the forum. They need to keep in mind a large number of the views are lurkers who never talk to anyone so it's nothing personal. Some people don't respond because they don't have any experience in the subject. If someone asked about flat ironing natural hair, sewins or bleaching I would have little to offer. Then there are people who ask questions without using the search engine first and some people don't respond because they have seen that same question a million times. Posting questions in low traffic area is usually fewer responses too.

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