Please Don't Use These Products

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Lifestyles Report...Hair scare
by Debbie Norrell

At least two months ago WPXI contacted me to do an interview about ingredients in hair care products used by African-Americans possibly leading to breast cancer. I was selected because I am a 15-year breast cancer survivor. I agreed to do the interview. However at the end of the taping I didn't know anything more about the study than before the cameras started rolling.

Recently WAMO news anchor and New Pittsburgh Courier freelance writer Allegra Battle did a story on this same subject and it was a feature on the May 9, 5 p.m. KDKA news. But at the end of these stories we still did not have a list of the products. Battle gave me the list that didn't make her feature during a recent visit I made to the WAMO studio's promoting the Pittsburgh Race for the Cure. So many of my friends have seen the stories on television or read about this issue in the paper and they want to know which products to be concerned about.

However I wanted to give you more so I went to the Internet and looked for articles from the Center for Environmental Oncology and found one entitled: Why Healthy People Get Cancer: Center Examines Environmental Suspects (update spring 2005).

The article stated, one of immediate research priorities of the new center is the puzzling phenomenon of breast cancer in African-Americans under the age of 40, who have nearly twice as much breast cancer as do white women.

The center will work with Silent Spring Institute, a Massachusetts based cancer institute, to identify suspect contaminants and ingredients in hair care products and other personal products regularly used by African-American young women and their mothers.

More recently, attention has turned to estrogenic compounds in hair care products used by Black women as a possible explanation for higher cancer rates in this population. I've started to carry copies of the list in my purse but we're going to share it with you right here. The list simply says: The following is a list of products that have previously been found to contain hormones:

Placenta Shampoo
Queen Helene Placenta cream hair conditioner
Placenta revitalizing shampoo
Perm Repair with placenta
Proline Perm Repair with placenta
Hormone hair food Jojoba oil
Triple action super grow
Supreme Vita-Gro
Luster's Sur Glo Hormone
B & B Super Gro
Lekair natural Super Glo
Lekair Hormone hair treatment with Vitamin E
Isoplus Hormone hair treatment wit Quinine
Fermodyl with Placenta hair conditioner
Supreme Vita-Gro with allantoin and estrogen plus TEA-COCO
Hask Placenta Hair conditioner
Nu Skin body smoother and
Nu Skin Enhancer.



The majority of these products contain placental extract, placenta, hormones or estrogen. As early as 1983 Dr. Devra Davis (epidemiologist and director of the Center for Environmental oncology, part of the University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute) and co-researcher Leon Bradlow advanced the theory that xenoestrogens, synthetic estrogen imitators, were a possible cause of breast cancer.

Davis also says, "most cases of breast cancer are not born, but made and the more hormones a woman is exposed to in her lifetime, the greater her risk of breast cancer."

We need to be more cautious of the products that we use on our hair and our bodies and demand that more information about our health is shared.

Ladies and gentlemen beware.

(Email the columnist at debbienorrell.com.)
"It moisturizes my situation... preserves my sexy."
:seriouslymad:madgo.gif what the crap??!!
Quote:
Originally Posted by CGNYC
Oh y'all, that's just her crazy showing.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trenellm
I guess lying on my back, in the middle of a studio, breathing and making vowel sounds for an hour for two years paid off.
Oh my goodness are you serious! I've used (well my Mother used them on my hair) Perm Repair & Lekair Super Glo as a child. I stopped using 'grease' and those types of creams a while ago. I can't remember the last time I purchased something like that. Thanks for the heads up on that though.
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I'm anal about reading labels, and I stick to natural products as much as possible.

Do you have a link to the cancer article?
I got this e-mailed to me and here's the article:

Why Healthy People Get Cancer:
Centre Examines Environmental Suspects
UPdate winter 2005




“Most cases of breast cancer are not born, but made”, writes epidemiologist Dr. Devra Davis. Davis is the director of a cancer centre with a difference, a centre for environmental oncology, part of the University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute.

Studies show that half of all breast cancers occur in women who have no known risk factors. Less than one case of breast cancer in ten occurs in women with a genetic predisposition to breast cancer. For years, breast cancer research focused on ‘the search for a cure’, with little emphasis on finding the causes for the dramatically rising rates. Then, the emphasis turned to lifestyle factors. In the late 90s, over half a million US women demanded that federal researchers look farther for the causes of breast cancer. Recently, the search for an explanation for the continuing dramatic rise in rates of breast cancer is turning more to environmental contaminants.

“There are about 10 million cancer survivors in the United States today, each of whom is concerned with both their own survival and with preventing disease from occurring in their family members,” said Dr. Davis. “Unfortunately, however, aside from smoking, drinking, other bad habits, and some workplace exposures, most cases of cancer occur in people who have led otherwise healthy lives. Patterns of the disease remain largely unexplained. According to Dr. Davis, research at the Center seeks to address a key question: What causes the majority of people who are born with a healthy array of genes – some 95 percent of women with breast cancer, for example – to develop defects during their lifetime that lead to cancer?

Led by Davis, the Center for Environmental Oncology (CEO will examine factors in the physical and chemical environment that have been linked to cancer. They will examine toxic chemicals, indoor and outdoor air pollutants, chlorination byproducts in domestic water, ingredients in personal care products, and organochlorine residues in animal and fish fat. They will also look at the impact of personal habits, both good and bad, such as nutrition, exercise, alcohol consumption and smoking.

One of the immediate research priorities of the new centre is the puzzling phenomenon of breast cancer in African-Americans under the age of 40, who have nearly twice as much breast cancer as do white women. The reasons for this disparity are unclear. The centre will work with Silent Spring Institute, a Massachusetts based cancer institute, to identify suspect contaminants and ingredients in hair care products and other personal products regularly used by African-American young women and their mothers.

As early at 1993, Davis and co-researcher Leon Bradlow advanced the theory that xenoestrogens, synthetic estrogen imitators, were a possible cause of breast cancer. More recently, attention has turned to estrogenic compounds in hair care products used by black women as a possible explanation for higher cancer rates in this population.

“Most of our national efforts against cancer have focused on detecting and treating disease after it has occurred,” said Ronald B. Herberman, M.D., director of UPCI and the UPMC Cancer Centers. “While this type of research is imperative, we simultaneously need to greatly improve our research efforts to develop effective interventions to address the known and suspected causes of cancer that may help us in our efforts at prevention.


http://www.environmentalhealth.ca/w05cancer.html
"It moisturizes my situation... preserves my sexy."
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Posts: 6,581
Thanks for the link!
You're welcome!
"It moisturizes my situation... preserves my sexy."
Cancer risk or no cancer risk, I made a conscious decision as a teen NEVER to use anything with 'placenta' in it.

GROSS.
Tehliurd likes this.
Hi msjoker,

I want to thank you for the warning! One of the products that I've been using over the past several months (and love ) contains placenta. It's the Curly Buttercreme Curve Salon product. I don't suppose I'll be using it anymore. Once again, thank you!
Dense kinky-curly; healthy and growing strong!
Hi msjoker,

I want to thank you for the warning! One of the products that I've been using over the past several months (and love ) contains placenta. It's the Curly Buttercreme Curve Salon product. I don't suppose I'll be using it anymore. Once again, thank you!
Originally Posted by Doc
AAAAHHHHH! I think Imma be sick...
Quote:
Originally Posted by CGNYC
Oh y'all, that's just her crazy showing.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trenellm
I guess lying on my back, in the middle of a studio, breathing and making vowel sounds for an hour for two years paid off.
Whoa! And to think I was gonna spend my hard-earned money on the Buttercreme.
"It moisturizes my situation... preserves my sexy."
Hi msjoker,

I want to thank you for the warning! One of the products that I've been using over the past several months (and love ) contains placenta. It's the Curly Buttercreme Curve Salon product. I don't suppose I'll be using it anymore. Once again, thank you!
Originally Posted by Doc
Really?????!!!! That is just so nasty and old school! What the H is placenta suppose to do...? Swirly? Can you explain what it does? Why in this day and age would it be in anything?
PJ
Had ro add what I found while searching...and this is something I recall hearing about in the news ...years ago. It made me angry then!

Shampoos Contain Clinical Doses of Estrogen



Early Puberty linked to Shampoos Containing Estrogen

April 03, 2002 19:00

Exclusive from New Scientist

SYNOPSIS: Some shampoos popular with African Americans contain high enough doses of estrogen to push young girls into early puberty.

Unbeknown to many parents, a few hair products - especially some marketed to black people - contain small amounts of hormones that could cause premature sexual development in girls.

The evidence that hair products containing oestrogens cause premature puberty is largely circumstantial, and the case is still unproven. But Ella Toombs, acting director for the Office of Cosmetics and Colors at the US Food and Drug Administration, told New Scientist: "No amount [of oestrogen] is considered safe and can be included in an over-the-counter product."

Under FDA regulations, over-the-counter products containing hormones are drugs, and thus require specific approval. However, there appears to be a grey area regarding products marketed before 1994. The FDA failed to respond to a request to clarify the position. At least five companies are still making hormone-containing hair products, a source within the industry - who preferred not to be named - told New Scientist.

Throughout the West, girls are tending to reach puberty earlier. This has been blamed on everything from improved diet to environmental contaminants. But African-American girls are developing even earlier than their white counterparts. About half of black girls in the US begin developing breasts or pubic hair by age eight, compared with just 15 per cent of white girls, one study has found. In Africa, girls enter puberty much later, regardless of their socioeconomic status.


"Placenta, hormones or estrogen"


That big discrepancy may be explained, at least in part, by the more frequent use of hormone-containing hair products among African Americans, says Chandra Tiwary, former chief of paediatric endocrinology at Brooke Army Medical Center in Texas. "I believe that the frequency of sexual precocity can be reduced simply if children do not use those hair products," he says.

The products are sold as shampoos or treatments to deep-condition dry, brittle hair. The labels usually state that they contain placenta, hormones or "estrogen", although not all products that make such claims contain active hormones. While New Scientist's inquiries suggest such products are no longer sold in Europe, many are still available worldwide over the Internet.

And they remain popular among African Americans. A small study published earlier this year by Su-Ting Li of the Child Health Institute in Seattle suggests that nearly half of African-American parents use such products, and that most also use them on their children.

For other ethnic groups the figure is under 10 per cent. Tiwary told New Scientist that he has carried out a bigger, as yet unpublished, survey of 2000 households that confirms these findings.

In 1998 Tiwary, now retired, published a study of four girls - including a 14-month-old - who developed breasts or pubic hair months after beginning to use such products. The symptoms started to disappear when they stopped using them. The year before, he published a study showing that some of the products used by his patients contained up to four milligrams of oestradiol per 100 grams. Others contained up to two grams of oestriol per 100 grams.


Readily absorbed


B&B Super Gro, for example, which was marketed before 1994 and is still on sale in the US and claims to be "rich in hormones", was found to contain 1.6 grams of oestriol per 100 grams. While the levels of oestriol in the products were much higher, oestradiol is a far more potent form of oestrogen.

There is no doubt that oestrogens are readily absorbed through the skin--hormone therapy is often delivered via patches. Long-term exposure to these doses could cause premature puberty, Tiwary believes.

And his studies are not the only ones hinting at a possible effect. Anecdotal reports in scientific papers going back to 1982 describe early puberty in children after use of hair treatments, as well as certain ointments. Tiwary notified the FDA of his concerns in 1994, but says he never received a reply.

The evidence that oestrogen-containing hair products cause early puberty remains limited. There are too many other suspect substances to pin the blame on them without further studies.

"A person isn't exposed to just one chemical, but rather a mix of many," says Julia Brody, director of the Silent Spring Institute in Massachusetts, a non-profit organisation that looks at the environment and women's health. "There is an increasing awareness that hormonally active compounds are present in cosmetic products."

Hormone-Containing Hair Product Use in Prepubertal Children
Some cosmetics contain estrogens, representing a potential source of exogenous estrogen for children. In contrast to pharmaceutical preparations, the Food and Drug Administration (Rockville, Md) does not regulate cosmetics containing less than 10 000 IU of estrogen per ounce, only stating that the label should direct consumers to limit the amount of product used to less than 20 000 IU/mo.1, 2 A therapeutic dose of oral ethinyl estradiol for hormone-replacement therapy in adults is 0.02 to 0.05 mg/d (4000-10 000 IU/d). An equivalent therapeutic transdermal estradiol dose for hormone-replacement therapy is 0.05 mg/d.

Two case series suggest that exogenous hormones found in hair products may be associated with early pubertal development in African American girls.2, 3 In 3 of 4 cases, pubertal characteristics regressed on discontinuation of these products.3 Patterns of use of hormone-containing hair products (HCHPs) are unknown. One survey of parents at 4 southern US Army hospital clinics revealed that 64% of African American parents and 6.9% of European-American parents used HCHPs, and 55.5% of those parents used them on their children.4

We estimated the prevalence of HCHP use among different ethnic groups in an urban clinic population, which included immigrant populations. We surveyed parents with children younger than 10 years attending 3 Seattle, Wash, pediatric clinics between November 1999 and January 2000. Color copies of product labels of HCHPs were used as pictorial guides. Age, sex, and frequency of exposure to HCHPs were documented to better understand whether prepubertal children were regularly exposed to these products.

A total of 130 parents were surveyed. Race/ethnicity was reported as follows: 25% African American, 25% African immigrant, 20% European American, 12% Asian/Pacific Islander, 11% Hispanic, and 6% other/unspecified. Of the 247 children reported, 55% were girls, 41% were boys, and 4% did not specify sex. Age group distribution was as follows: 8%, younger than 1 year; 48%, 1 to 5 years; 26%, 6 to 9 years; and 19%, 10 to 18 years.

The use of HCHPs was reported by 21% (27/130) of respondents (Table 1). More African American parents (45%) used HCHP than parents of all other races/ethnicities (2 = 16.4; P<.001), including African immigrant parents (12%). Eighty-five percent of parents using HCHPs also used these products on their children, including children younger than 5 years. Most families (65%) who used HCHPs on their children used them only occasionally but a third of families reported regular use. One limitation of this study is that we were unable to quantitate the exact dose or absorption of these products.

A recent study revealed that girls are developing at an earlier age than has been observed previously and there is a significant difference between mean age of onset of puberty in European American compared with African American girls.5, 6 Since it is unknown why African American girls are entering puberty at an earlier age than their European American or African counterparts, it is possible that the use of HCHPs may contribute to earlier onset of puberty in this population. More research is needed to ascertain whether an association exists between the use of HCHPs and the early onset of puberty.

Relevancy 0.82
Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine / volume:156 (page: 85)
Hormone-Containing Hair Product Use in Prepubertal Children
Su-Ting T. Li, MD; Paula Lozano, MD, MPH; David C. Grossman, MD, MPH; Elinor Graham, MD, MPH
January 2002
ABSTRACT | FULL TEXT | PDF (75K)
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Oh man. African American women have it hard. Breast cancer, overdoses of estrogen, AIDS.... it's a conspiracy. I'm joking, but I'm kind of not. Why are so many bad things put into products marketed towards African Americans?

Thank goodness I don't use any of those products, but I'll let some of my friends know who might. I saw a tube of Perm Repair in my friend's cabinet while I was home, I'll definitely tell her. However, the lady that used to do my hair did use BB super gro when she greased my scalp at the end. Scary.
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The article PJ posted has come up before, don't remember if it was here or not.

I understand the feelings about a possible conspiracy... i feel either that or these ingredients are just really, really CHEAP.
[quote="... it's a conspiracy.[/quote]

I was thinking the exact same thing! Call me paranoid, but I don't think it's a coincidence. I'm so glad this information was posted because I had no idea. Here I was worried about the hormones they inject in the animals they try to feed us but I would have never thought they'd try to sneak hormones in other ways too.
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