CurlTalk

CurlTalk (http://www.naturallycurly.com/curltalk/)
-   4 (http://www.naturallycurly.com/curltalk/4/)
-   -   Is a Texturizer a Relaxer? (http://www.naturallycurly.com/curltalk/4/37304-texturizer-relaxer.html)

mariag002 01-27-2008 02:29 AM

Is a Texturizer a Relaxer?
 
I found this at 3:00am (I'm working), half asleep and it really made me mad. Is a texturizer a relaxer? Why do we have to put this garbage on our babies?

Original website: http://www.sunflower-mom.blogspot.com/

Message from the Hair Care Expert: Why Texture Softener is NOT a relaxer


There has been a decade long misconception about relaxers, texturizers and now Texture Softener. In essence a relaxer is designed to take the hair from A to Z. That is to straighten any type of over-curly hair...100% straight. To get the hair straight, you have to use a manual process, by smoothing it out either using your hands or a comb. Alternatively, the Texture Softener has the same basic technology, but you do not use the hand or comb to straighten the hair. Texture Softener is buffered by the exclusive anti-breakage Sunflower Oil Formula which acts to gently protect the texture of the hair and infuse moisture throughout the process, yielding a much different product AND OUTCOME. Realizing that there had to be a happy medium between 100% straight and 100% natural, the makers of Just For Me saught to develop a safe, gentle way that would give mom's an alternative. The Texture Softener in essence gives a girl the best of both worlds; hair thats easy to comb, soft and managable with ability to retain her natural texture.

If you read the comments someone said she is misleading consumers. I'd post the answer to that question, but it made no sense and I got a headache. :sad8:

Hairblogger â„¢ 01-27-2008 05:37 AM

Yes.

All chemical stylers (hair dye, or highlights for example) are not relaxers, but Anything used to chemically straighten, curl, set , wave, texturize, (chemically) silken or soften the hair is a form of relaxer.

Chemical color is not a relaxer, but it is a chemical styler.

And since No Conditioner will require a neutralizing rinse. And No conditioner causes burns to the scalp or hair if left unattended. You know what the grounds for your lawsuit will be if someone gives you a chemical service or modified chem-service without your permission.

Mo_Gemini22 01-27-2008 09:06 AM

Someone in the "straightening/relaxing" forum was asking about texturizers and listed the site to the Texture Softner. I almost thought about getting a Texture Softner for my hair! Hopefully the person who was aksing about texurizers will read the posts over here.

mariag002 01-27-2008 09:12 AM

Mo_Gemini22 I saw her question and was curious so I googled it. My niece had a "soft relaxer" or whatever you call it (in spanish we call it alisado) when she was about 5 yrs old. She has 4b hair and my sister was having a hard time combing her hair. At first it looked cute, but then after a while it started to cost my sister lots of money to keep taking her to a salon. After a while he hair looked crispy and really dry. I think that's way too young to get any chemicals in your hair. I think that a kid should be at least 13 yrs old and have the option to get one.

If the original poster gets a texturizer, at least she's old enough to maintain it and know what she's getting.

missmonie 01-27-2008 09:32 AM

The illustration on the site to show the "before" and "after" is interesting. Actually....I think it's pretty ridiculous...but I guess it's all about marketing! Can't you just detangle the hair while wet to get the same effect?


http://www.texturesoftener.com/image...xture_work.jpg

eccentric_kurlz 01-27-2008 10:32 AM

It is a relaxer in sheep's clothing. The main "relaxing" ingredients are calcium hyrdroxide and guanidine carbonate. The calcium hydroxide is an alkaline that is substituted for lye in "no-lye" relaxers, which is actually worse for the hair than sodium hydroxide(lye). When used in combination with guanidine carbonate, they create a permanent waving affect(what the hair industry calls 'texturizing'), but can still straighten the hair. Any chemical that alters the structure of the hair has the potential to straighten the hair. Period. Even with some hair dyes, you can potentially relax the curl.

I believe Webbie(Webjockey) posted something about this product and that blog in the "hall of shame" forum. I think it's disgusting that the hair care industry is misleading parents who may not have an idea of how to care for their children's hair. Yeah....just slap on some chemicals to make your child's hair "manageable". :eyeroll:. Everyone's hair is manageable, you just have to have the patience. I just think they give parents false hopes that this product is going to be the "miracle product", and not realize that there is still important maintenance involved, even after its use.

subbrock 01-27-2008 01:13 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by eccentric_kurlz (Post 474091)
It is a relaxer in sheep's clothing. The main "relaxing" ingredients are calcium hyrdroxide and guanidine carbonate. The calcium hydroxide is an alkaline that is substituted for lye in "no-lye" relaxers, which is actually worse for the hair than sodium hydroxide(lye). When used in combination with guanidine carbonate, they create a permanent waving affect(what the hair industry calls 'texturizing'), but can still straighten the hair. Any chemical that alters the structure of the hair has the potential to straighten the hair. Period. Even with some hair dyes, you can potentially relax the curl.


totally true. even in salons, they use the same relaxer to "texturize" hair. the only difference is the application and the amount of time its left on. plus a relaxer's job isnt to straighten your hair, its just to "relax" the natural texture. that common misconception is why so many people get jacked up with relaxers, trying to get their hair bone straight.

no lye relaxers/texturizers leave your hair a mess anyway.

but to each his own.

Suburbanbushbabe 01-27-2008 08:39 PM

Quote:

• DON'T use any No-Lye or No-Base Relaxer product with Just For
Me™ Texture Softener™.
• DON'T apply Texture Softener™ to hair permed with ammonium
thiogylocolate (curly perm) or bleached hair.

WARNING:
This product is not a toy. This product contains calcium hydroxide and guanidine carbonate (toxic). Keep out of the reach of children.
No amount of sunflower oil can change the fact that this is a relaxer. Their marketing is deceptive. Not to mention if you go to the product site, the graphics and sound are totally geared toward children and young teens. They have gone over to the dark side with the cigarette manufacturers.

missmonie 01-27-2008 09:29 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by eccentric_kurlz (Post 474091)
I believe Webbie(Webjockey) posted something about this product and that blog in the "hall of shame" forum. I think it's disgusting that the hair care industry is misleading parents who may not have an idea of how to care for their children's hair. Yeah....just slap on some chemicals to make your child's hair "manageable". :eyeroll:. Everyone's hair is manageable, you just have to have the patience. I just think they give parents false hopes that this product is going to be the "miracle product", and not realize that there is still important maintenance involved, even after its use.

I agree. I don't think chemicals should be the only alternative. I suppose some parents of bi-racial children find it to be pretty daunting...but it's possible to care for natural hair without this so called "miracle product". I found this quote online about the product which sorta ticks me off:

The product, Soft & Beautiful Just For Me Texture Softener, is intended as an alternative to hair pressing or relaxing. It launched last spring as an extension of A-C’s larger Soft & Beautiful brand of relaxers and related products for children from 4 to 11 years old. …Just For Me Texture Softener, in this initial marketing phase, is going after parents of girls from multiethnic or biracial backgrounds–specifically, “white moms who have black daughters, blood related or adopted–which is an underserved market,” said a public relations rep for Soft & Beautiful at A-C’s agency M Strategies, Dallas, Texas.

jathomas0910 06-09-2009 04:59 PM

???
 
I have been natural for a little over a year now and my hair is so out of control, I have been following all the rules and using good products, women are always saying I have nice hair and it's now collar bone length and very thick...but it's getting more difficult to manage and just trying to manage it I break so much of so I was thinking about using a relaxer and I was in CVS and ran across the just for me texture softener...I have read a lot of good reviews, I really don’t want my hair straight but I do want to be able to comb through it without breakage or put it in a pony tail without it taking and hour so I can comb it in to place

So giving my situation...should I go ahead and use this product?

Thanks

msjaim 06-09-2009 05:32 PM

its all about personal choice... just remember when/if u decide to stop using the relaxer, ull have to deal with the transitioning phase or big chop again.

LeeMayhem 10-22-2009 10:19 PM

well
 
its basically a mild relaer, but i live and let live, so if others choose to use it, it's thier business......though in my opinion using it on a child that does not know/understand the concept of altering their hair texture with chemicals is......wrong

Tiggilene 10-23-2009 01:10 AM

Texturizer = devil's mayonnaise.

Jathomas0910, if your hair is breaking, I'm pretty sure weakening it further with a chemical 'softening' would only make things worse.

Have you tried henna? I thought my hair HATED that stuff, but when I got the right brand (Jamila BAQ in the clear cello) and mixed it w. coconut milk, my hair came out great and a lot more manageable.

IMHO, I'd try a few more options before adding chemicals.

Sandy Coils 10-23-2009 07:52 AM

ITA w/ Tiggilene
 
I say try henna. Henna has been a lifesaver for me. My hair is naturally tightly coiled. The henna has loosened my coil just enough for it to me a little easier to manage.

I thought about a txt early in the game, but I'm so glad I didn't, because now when i see people that have them, their hair also begins to thin out and I just didn't want to have togo through the transition phase again, and after growing my hair out, I surely didn't want to have to BC again.

jay76 10-23-2009 08:23 AM

Ladies, great info!!!
 
I'm at Day 4 and still haven't done the final sulfate wash. I'm still trying to find a good conditioner and I'llhave to stop be Trader Joe's today after work.

However, I was leaning real hard towards getting a texturizer just to make my hair manageable. But I really think I will do the Henna instead!

Thanks!

cayisha_azul 10-23-2009 09:31 AM

Baloney - Ban This Stuff
 
The company is misleading and outright lying to consumers trying to coax loving parents into burning their childrens scalp and hair. It is not safe for children and the FDA should ban all kiddie relaxers, texturizers, texture softeners, whatever... They are all the same thing. Relaxers should have a suggested age like 12 or 13. Not that people will listen but some parents may pause before they do it. It should also be illiegal to relax children's hair in salons. I think that would cut down on the practice.

sobecurl 10-23-2009 12:42 PM

This whole relaxer/texturizer/kiddie perm thing is so frustrating:banghead:.

I think as parents, it is our responsibility to learn how to treat and take care of our little girls' hair. I saw a little girl in McDonald's yesterday who could have been no more than 2 years old with microbraids down to her ankles, and you could see that her edges were already broken off - at 2 YEARS OLD!!

I understand it may be challenging as a caucasian mom with biracial children, but I would think you would educate yourself before you have kids to prepare for any type of hair. Not to mention there is so much information out there. If this mom is computer savy enough to have a blog, then she could easily do a google search on natural hair care for AA girls instead of running to a texturizer cuz her daughters hair is "different".

Kudos to the mom of the Happy Girl Hair blog. Her daughters are adopted and she takes tremendous care of their hair in its natural state and does not rely on chemical short cuts. I wish more moms, both AA and non-AA moms, would follow her lead and allow our daughter to embrace the beauty of their natural texture. It sets up a vicious self-hating cycle for our little girls.

Alexjoujou 10-23-2009 04:15 PM

I think you are right with the marketing.

When my daughter was 9 someone gave us one of these kits (Just for me) and told me it was a "texturizer" and would work well for my daughter's mixed hair. Her hair was short at the time and when it's short it is much curlier so looked closer to 3B mixed with some 4 type hair...it was a real mess as I had no idea how to care for this thick mane of hair that turned into dreadlocks at day 3 without combing. For years she endured every other day washes with combing it out that took over 2 hours. It got to the point she and I dreaded it so much but she really wanted long hair. We did this until I found this website this summer. 3 l-l-o-o-o-n-n-n-gg-g-g-g-g-g years. It was the primary problem between us since it was always traumatic and no one could help. I spent HUNDREDS on products for her hair.

She's 12 now. She has multitextured hair (her dad is a type 4 but kinky not coily and very coarse and dry) which was so hard to take care of.

At the time I didn't even know what a relaxer was...you might find this funny but I had no idea that all the straight hair I was seeing on so many black women was not their real hair. I mean I grew up with perms with rods as my mom's way to handle my hair once I was a teen (or when I was little she cut it short in a pixie cut) so I was familiar with the perm concept--changing the texture chemically of hair.

Anyway I took one look at the ingredients and decided that there was no way I was going to put this on my kids head. Come to find out from my friend that her friend (who gave her this for me but whom I met only once or twice) was doing this to her daughter's hair since age 5...and doing it all the time (relaxer at the salon). To be blunt I was horrified. A 5 year old is just too young for this type of chemical. It's true my mom gave me perms when I was older (with rods to get it much more curly as it was easier to manage then my curls at the time which were all over the place wavy, ringlet's, and some coils but together I looked like a beach bum who hadn't washed for months) but I was like 13 the first one I got and I KNEW what it would do.

It still just is so upseting to me to see that people would do this with their little child. I think 3C/4A/B hair on a child is so versatile if its well taken care of...the styles are fun and cute and gorgeous and they are so varied...much more variety IMHO than what I could do with my texture as a kid. Everything would fall out of my hair since it's so fine and the only thing I could use was rubber bands which would always have to be cut out. We did do braids for my daughter occasionally when she was younger and they were wicked cute--with beads on the ends. The main problem is that her mix of hair means they don't stay but for 3-4 days and it is a lot of work to do them so we stopped.

We have a great routine now that is working so well. She's so happy with her hair and me too. After going on this board we know that whatever changes her hair goes through in the future we'll be ready for them and will know how to respond or where to get advice :lol:

lmackey0001 03-09-2010 01:55 PM

Sigh of relief...
 
I'm so happy to see so many of you ladies who agree with how totally wrong it is to put chemicals in a child's hair. My mother put a relaxer in my hair, but I was 13 years old and by the time I was 18 years old, I realized that this was not the way. I haven't put color or chemicals on my hair since and this site has been a GOD sent to my daughter and me. I would straighten my hair with a dryer and flat iron and rock the curls in the summer, but I've gone all the way curly now! I love my curls; I just never knew what to put on them and how to achieve the looks I want.
My daughters hair is 3c and extremely, extremely thick. She has more hair than grown women!!!! And it is very difficult to untangle. It's not impossible, just difficult so if anyone has any advice, let me know! I will say that she does have her hair blowdryed no more than once a month. I two-strand twist her hair and she gets it cornrowed and it lasts longer and is easier to style once blown out. But, I have never, ever considered relaxing or putting any kind of chemical on her hair! And when she is older, I will discourage that as much as possible!!

Mslizzia 03-09-2010 04:45 PM

It's definitely a relaxer. There's no doubt about that. I used to get texturizers before i found this site. It was good the first 2 times but it quickly started to become a pain because some of the texturizer got on the hair that was already texturized and it became straight hair.

As you can imagine, that was not something that i was interested in doing because i would only do it every 3 months.


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 12:48 AM.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2011 NaturallyCurly.com