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Old 07-08-2008, 05:04 AM   #61
 
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I think the problem with the whole race categorizing thing is that how would it be done? If skin tone is the sole variant then there are a lot of white folks who would be put into the black category simply b/c they tan so damn much. I am from Louisiana and so is my family for generations. I understand the Creole, mixed, good hair vs bad hair thing better than anybody. It's all dumb. It all stems back from slavery and the oppression afterwards where multi racial ppl could get better jobs (or a job period other than being a maid) and were accepted better by white folks. I completely understand where it came from and for some that brown paper bag test is what allowed them to get a job that would feed their families. So they played to role. I'm not mad at them at all. They did what they had to to survive. The problem today with that is like so many things stuff starts to go to your head. Iím sure a lot of ppl didnít think it (society) would get any better. So they taught self hating things to their children (or they learned it) in order to make sure the fair skin tone continued. Unfortunately, regardless of race/background ppl are flawed. They get uppity and think they are better than others. The same thing happens with money. Some rich ppl think the world should revolve around them. The same way some lighter skinned ppl think they are better than others.
VERY well said.

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Messages are passed down for generations that you need to be this way in order to survive. I say this b/c my grandmother raised me and she has a slave mentality to me. Sheís more concerned with me being able to cook and clean than get an education. She really didnít get that I didnít have to do that. I could go to school and learn instead of having to struggle and just take whatever is handed to me. Again not mad at anyone. Once you begin to understand ďwhyĒ someone thinks they way they do ( good start is who raised them and in what decade) you can stop being mad at folks and just know that this skewed thinking has been so re-enforced that it will be hard to retrain their minds. As for today, there's no reason for all the division. If getting a "race" test were madatory like at birth or something then more ppl would find out they are multiracial regardless of their skin tone. Please everyone try to understand where someone is coming from. You never know what they were taught.
I agree that it's REALLY hard to break out of that way of thinking, especially if it's ALL you're taught. You never really know what all someone has been through, since most people don't unload all their baggage upon meeting someone lol. Even though people might put their foot in their mouths on an issue, a lot of times they don't mean it the way it sounds.

For instance, even though my dad's family spout off all that stupid creole stuff all the time, about a third of them married non-mixed black people, so it's not that strong. They did however freely admit that they regretted ending up with such dark kids though.
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Old 07-08-2008, 05:46 AM   #62
 
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I don't consider myself creole, but it is a part of my makeup. I do agree about creole being a culture and not just a catagory of color. I also agree w/ Mozeke about being able to sympathize w/ someones experience. My maternal grandparents were from the country (Mississippi) and they were very "yes massa". It was so embarrassing sometimes. It helped to know that she was raised on a plantation post slavery. Mississippi is also a very racist state.
I don't consider myself a creole either, when people ask me what I am, I just say my dad's side is creole, and that's how I think of it. As a culture I do consider myself creole, since I like it, and it doesn't exclude based on race. In that context creole means mixed and non-mixed blacks, and white people who aren't Cajuns. The older I've gotten the more I like it, and I hate how so few people listen to Zydeco music .

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You were saying how the hair that moved saved you. I always thought how I never really experienced any racism growing up in New Orleans. I just always thought we were all different and we all looked different. I did always have long hair that moved and maybe that was it. My maternal always made a big deal about my hair and she would point out things that I ate or what I looked like being like those creole people.
Outside of my dad's family, I've never been mistreated for my color. I'm not so dark to be mistreated for it, and not so light that I got teased for it. My sister with the tighter hair still gets angry when she thinks about the treatment on the basis of hair. In any other black family, she would have "good" hair and be considered really light skinned, but with them she was just barely out of the dark category, and that was what made up for her hair.

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My paternal grandmother was creole, but if you called her white she would get so mad. So, I know in my family that being creole wasn't a matter of being better than black. It was more of a cultural thing. My aunt had a picture on her wall of my grandmother and aunt. I kind of glanced at the picture and in all seriousness asked my cousin why they had white people on their wall. My cousin laughed and said she was going to tell my grandmother. I begged and pleaded with her to not tell b/c I knew how mad it made her.
My dad's family don't like being mistaken for white either, and think they're better than white people too lol! Also, they'll freak out if someone confuses creole and cajun. I would mistake a lot of the people at family gatherings for white people, and didn't know that some of them were black until I was much older lol. It gives you an EXTREMELY expansive view of what black is.

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My paternal great-grandparents were very racist and it left a bad taste in my dad's mouth. People are different. All people are different. You can never assume that all white people are racist and the same for black, asian, jamaican or other. I know it's not my job but whenever I meet an ignorant person, I feel the need to share rather than get angry. I said ignorant not stupid.
My dad is racist in a REALLY complicated way. He first and foremost thinks that creole people are the best, but within that likes the darker creoles, and I remember whenever he'd look at family photos he would say how many beautiful colors the women in our family were, so I was never made to feel too dark by him. However, whenever we were in Louisianna and would see a non-mixed black person, he and the other creoles would laugh and say something disgustingly racist, his favorite was to call them Ju-Ju's, (it was because it reminded him and his siblings of the africans on the tarzan tv show growing up, pronounced like jew-jew). This wasn't to their faces though.

It was especially weird because aside from my mom, my dad only liked dark skinned black women! I think the Ju Ju thing alone qualifies him as an extreme racist, but it's weird since he genuinely doesn't think "white is right". It's such a screwed up culture.
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Old 07-08-2008, 07:00 AM   #63
 
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Truly- Wow, your dad is complicated (no disrespect). I must say though that dark skinned creole are so beautiful. I can't believe he calls non-mixed black americans Ju-Jus. My mouth dropped as I read your thread. This is one of the reason the older generation doesn't like what the younger generations do. When I say older I mean 50s and up and when I say younger I mean 30s and down and especially us youngins. My grandmother doesn't understand why I have asian, hispanic, white, and black friends. A lot of them grew up when everybody had separate everything and the mind is the hardest thing to change. That's why I make sure to take advantage of all the freedoms that those who came before me couldn't and in some cases wouldn't. I want to enjoy everyone's company. Not just black folks.


Also I like the part when you said you didn't know some of the ppl in your family were black until you were older. That's what I was saying in my thread yesterday. What is being black? Do we measure it by skin tone, ancestors, blood, etc? We (ppl worldwide, but especially americans) are just way to occupied with the surface of things. I'v always seen being black as a heritage and not a skin tone b/c my mother is fair skinned (beyonce color). My sister and myself are both dark skinned.
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Old 07-08-2008, 09:32 AM   #64
 
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Really lol?!!! With a paper bag colored gate that you have to stand in front of for admittance lol? And maybe they'd have different floors in the apartments according to skintone lol?
OK, I actually did LOL at this. I don't know... I got disgusted by it and left. It was a biracial website I stumbled upon when looking up biracial hair help. (I found nc.com right afterwards!)

I'm having a hard time understanding what you mean by "giving black people another chance." I don't dislike any group! I just will never fully identify myself as black or white. I will use "we" statements when referring to all people of color, but I am constantly reminded of my "otherness." (This was made even more abundantly clear to me by a large portion of my African American humanities classmates recently.)

This is not to say that no black people (or white people) accept me. I AM accepted as a human being and friend. I'm just not.... the same. I am treated differently. It is extremely difficult for me to explain this.

Still, this is OK! I am fine with being different! It's not like I'm left outside crying in the rain by myself! I have great friends and family and I wouldn't change it for the world. I think I am lucky because being mixed gives me a different perspective on things, IMO. I will always be friends with any decent person who is nice to me. Race, religion, sexuality, gender... it doesn't matter! I love you all!

/end disgustingly sappy post


P.S.
I feel like getting some popcorn and watching the debate between BekkaPoo and jeamaria. I know it sounds impossible, but I kind of agree with both of you. There are standards that society follows and you can't just ignore them and make them go away. However, I think we can attempt to change them by not giving those norms any power and hope others eventually follow us. Does that make sense?
My son is biracial, and he looks very white. His features are a bit like mine, but he is mistaken for being white all the time and I worry sometimes how his little life will be and how he will feel like he doesn't fit in with either side.
Heck, one of my paternal grandparents was hispanic and one of my maternal great great grandparents was white (due to rape, so I'm told) so even I've gotten that feeling that I didn't fit in, even though I consider myself black and rarely feel that I am something else. It's the way other people treat you that makes you feel like an outsider.

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I admit sometimes that snobbery is deeply ingrained in me too though. I remember my sister and I rolled our eyes at each other when we heard someone describe Beyonce, (also a creole) as light skinned. Why should we care?! jcurldady, are you creole, and do you think crap like that sometimes? It's automatic, and it's not even my values!
I don't consider myself creole, but it is a part of my makeup. I do agree about creole being a culture and not just a catagory of color. I also agree w/ Mozeke about being able to sympathize w/ someones experience. My maternal grandparents were from the country (Mississippi) and they were very "yes massa". It was so embarrassing sometimes. It helped to know that she was raised on a plantation post slavery. Mississippi is also a very racist state.

You were saying how the hair that moved saved you. I always thought how I never really experienced any racism growing up in New Orleans. I just always thought we were all different and we all looked different. I did always have long hair that moved and maybe that was it. My maternal always made a big deal about my hair and she would point out things that I ate or what I looked like being like those creole people.

My paternal grandmother was creole, but if you called her white she would get so mad. So, I know in my family that being creole wasn't a matter of being better than black. It was more of a cultural thing. My aunt had a picture on her wall of my grandmother and aunt. I kind of glanced at the picture and in all seriousness asked my cousin why they had white people on their wall. My cousin laughed and said she was going to tell my grandmother. I begged and pleaded with her to not tell b/c I knew how mad it made her.

My paternal great-grandparents were very racist and it left a bad taste in my dad's mouth. People are different. All people are different. You can never assume that all white people are racist and the same for black, asian, jamaican or other. I know it's not my job but whenever I meet an ignorant person, I feel the need to share rather than get angry. I said ignorant not stupid.
I am from Mississippi as was my grandmother and I thought she was like that too...overly kind to white people, but then I realized that she was like that to black people too. It was just her being kind. Of course, no one's race got in the way when she got mad. I saw many a salesperson, white or black, get it good from her when she got mad enough lol.

Mississippi can be a racist place, though it is more subtle usually though still present.
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Old 07-08-2008, 09:34 AM   #65
 
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P.S.
I feel like getting some popcorn and watching the debate between BekkaPoo and jeamaria. I know it sounds impossible, but I kind of agree with both of you.

I know right?! My genetics professor didn't have anything on those two, I feel like I'm back in class right now lol.
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Old 07-08-2008, 10:51 AM   #66
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Cammy, I wonder if I'll ever meet your father. I think yours and mine should join a country club together, lol! INFJ, right? Maybe he can get along with my INTJ dad...?

In regards to this thread, I have two black parents but my skin tone is very light. My mother's side is made up of mulattos, my father's side is strictly black. My mother has straight hair, my grandmother has straight hair, my great-grandmother has straight hair, and then there's me: the only kinky girl in the family, lol. A lot of people ask me if I'm "mixed," because my eyes and nose don't look "traditionally black." Growing up, it always pissed me off when people asked me if I was. I felt that looking "white-ish" got in the way of my proud "blackness." But now...it seems a little silly how hung up everyone gets about race...ANY race. People want to define themselves on something so frivolous, myself included, and reading all of these posts, it just seems so trivial to place so much value on that. So what if you're half white and half black? You're who you want to be, your ethnicity doesn't define who you are. Why get hung up about something so stupid? I'm 1/4th white with a straight nose and kinky nappy hair! I'm happy to be me.
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Old 07-08-2008, 11:47 AM   #67
 
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Cammy, I wonder if I'll ever meet your father. I think yours and mine should join a country club together, lol! INFJ, right? Maybe he can get along with my INTJ dad...?

In regards to this thread, I have two black parents but my skin tone is very light. My mother's side is made up of mulattos, my father's side is strictly black. My mother has straight hair, my grandmother has straight hair, my great-grandmother has straight hair, and then there's me: the only kinky girl in the family, lol. A lot of people ask me if I'm "mixed," because my eyes and nose don't look "traditionally black." Growing up, it always pissed me off when people asked me if I was. I felt that looking "white-ish" got in the way of my proud "blackness." But now...it seems a little silly how hung up everyone gets about race...ANY race. People want to define themselves on something so frivolous, myself included, and reading all of these posts, it just seems so trivial to place so much value on that. So what if you're half white and half black? You're who you want to be, your ethnicity doesn't define who you are. Why get hung up about something so stupid? I'm 1/4th white with a straight nose and kinky nappy hair! I'm happy to be me.
We have similar backgrounds and ITA with what you just said here. It's so ridiculous with all that's going on in the world to be caught up over something as trivial as a social construct called race. We can't even agree on what it race is half of the time.
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Old 07-08-2008, 12:31 PM   #68
 
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You know...I think that this is prob the first time that i've witnessed a discussion/debate on something as hot button an issue as race and it not result into name calling and sterotyping people. Kudos ladies.
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Old 07-08-2008, 12:53 PM   #69
 
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My husband is white and I am black. I'm much more PC and prefer the term biracial for our hypothetical kids, while he prefers the term mulatto. I don't like that term at all, but oh well. Anyway, I will teach my children that they are to say they are mixed, black and white, or other if anyone asks them. My mom actually used to teach us to choose other in the box on school forms. Anyway, has anyone seen "The Human Stain"?


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Old 07-08-2008, 01:10 PM   #70
 
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My husband is white and I am black. I'm much more PC and prefer the term biracial for our hypothetical kids, while he prefers the term mulatto. I don't like that term at all, but oh well. Anyway, I will teach my children that they are to say they are mixed, black and white, or other if anyone asks them. My mom actually used to teach us to choose other in the box on school forms. Anyway, has anyone seen "The Human Stain"?


"D"
That's interesting because my mom used to tell us we were "mixed" when I was a kid and my dad always used the term "biracial."

I don't mind people calling me any name (even mulatto) as long as they're not calling me (and trust me, I've heard it ALL) high yella, redbone, oreo, graham cracker, half n' half, zebra, whifrican, confused...
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Old 07-08-2008, 01:20 PM   #71
 
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This is interesting...considering the HISTORY of the term mulatto, that people are embracing it. Where I'm from (down deep deep deeeeeep south) calling someone a mulatto is like calling them a ni$$er, cracker, or even spitting in there face. The term mulatto for ME...will always carry a certain stigma and I can't use it....just like I don't use the term ni&&er or any of its new found variations.
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Old 07-08-2008, 01:36 PM   #72
 
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This is interesting...considering the HISTORY of the term mulatto, that people are embracing it. Where I'm from (down deep deep deeeeeep south) calling someone a mulatto is like calling them a ni$$er, cracker, or even spitting in there face. The term mulatto for ME...will always carry a certain stigma and I can't use it....just like I don't use the term ni&&er or any of its new found variations.
I agree. We got in a heated argument about this. I'm from Louisiana and he's from California. You can imagine the culture differences. He claims its something beautiful while I feel its a bit racist in its origin but ehh. I gave up on the issue for now. We even had to have a discussion about him using the phrase "Negro, please". I just feel there are some things you shouldn't say, even if you are family, because you never know who you might unintentionally hurt.

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Old 07-08-2008, 01:38 PM   #73
 
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This is interesting...considering the HISTORY of the term mulatto, that people are embracing it. Where I'm from (down deep deep deeeeeep south) calling someone a mulatto is like calling them a ni$$er, cracker, or even spitting in there face. The term mulatto for ME...will always carry a certain stigma and I can't use it....just like I don't use the term ni&&er or any of its new found variations.
ITA. I think people are drawn to it because it sounds Italian and exotic, but the word basically means a mule; the infertile offspring of two different species, infertile because in nature, different species are not meant to reproduce together. With that knowledge, it would be odd to choose to use a name to describe one's children that completely condemns the parents' union.
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Old 07-08-2008, 01:40 PM   #74
 
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Truly- Wow, your dad is complicated (no disrespect). I must say though that dark skinned creole are so beautiful. I can't believe he calls non-mixed black americans Ju-Jus. My mouth dropped as I read your thread. This is one of the reason the older generation doesn't like what the younger generations do. When I say older I mean 50s and up and when I say younger I mean 30s and down and especially us youngins. My grandmother doesn't understand why I have asian, hispanic, white, and black friends. A lot of them grew up when everybody had separate everything and the mind is the hardest thing to change. That's why I make sure to take advantage of all the freedoms that those who came before me couldn't and in some cases wouldn't. I want to enjoy everyone's company. Not just black folks.
Complicated is too nice a word for someone that says crap like that, but he is my dad lol, and that's what he was taught growing up. Within his family, there are 10 kids total, and he's 58 now, and they're all pretty close in age, so I think you got that generational split EXACTLY right lol. Among them, cruel nickname-wise, I have an uncle Sam, (it was shortened from Sambo, what they called him growing up, because he was the darkest, and he's lighter than me!!! I also have an Aunt Nap- I think that nickname speaks for itself lol. The names stuck, since that's what I still call them, and I didn't even know that Sam wasn't even his real name till I was like 20!

I was only like 13 or so when my dad called those people Ju Ju's, my brothers and sister's jaws dropped to when we heard him say that. They were just walking down the street, being dark lol, which was worth saying something racist about them. I said, "Well, we're black too, that's really mean.", and he just said, "Not that black." My siblings and I are still disgusted by that. My mom's family is mixed too, and I've NEVER heard that type of crap come from them. Thank GOD for her influence lol!

Weirdest of all about him, the man HATES white people! My sister and I weren't allowed to have posters of the white teeny-bopper stars on the walls in our room. He was furious! He would also tell us all the time not to get too close to our white friends, not to mention he hates pretty much all ethnic groups that aren't black. I could start a race war anywhere just by quoting him lol, even among ourselves, with the Ju Ju thing for instance lol.

NONE of my siblings and I came out with this sort of viewpoint, and we get along with everyone. Once again, my mom's influence, and that's the side where all of my biracial cousins come from. My mom's family isn't racist at all, and she finds the crap his family says horrifying too. When she went to a family reunion with my older brother when he was a baby, (he's dark reddish brown with 3b hair, totally wasted on a boy, I also have an even darker little brother with 3a hair!), one of my dad's drunken uncles came up to her and said, "Where the hell did you get that o'l DARK BABY!" Admittedly, he is UNUSUALLY dark for someone with 2 light-skinned parents lol. My dad thinks this is a HILARIOUS annecdote), but my mom was FREAKED OUT. Aren't creoles delightful?

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Also I like the part when you said you didn't know some of the ppl in your family were black until you were older. That's what I was saying in my thread yesterday. What is being black? Do we measure it by skin tone, ancestors, blood, etc? We (ppl worldwide, but especially americans) are just way to occupied with the surface of things. I'v always seen being black as a heritage and not a skin tone b/c my mother is fair skinned (beyonce color). My sister and myself are both dark skinned.
That's EXACTLY how I see being black. It's not something you're sentenced to lol, this isn't the Jim Crow Era!!! Black is a culture, and an ethnic group, not a class of people. However, in this country and many others, there is still a stigma and consequences for being black, but no one feels compelled to "pass" anymore lol.
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Old 07-08-2008, 01:48 PM   #75
 
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This is interesting...considering the HISTORY of the term mulatto, that people are embracing it. Where I'm from (down deep deep deeeeeep south) calling someone a mulatto is like calling them a ni$$er, cracker, or even spitting in there face. The term mulatto for ME...will always carry a certain stigma and I can't use it....just like I don't use the term ni&&er or any of its new found variations.
ITA. I think people are drawn to it because it sounds Italian and exotic, but the word basically means a mule; the infertile offspring of two different species, infertile because in nature, different species are not meant to reproduce together. With that knowledge, it would be odd to choose to use a name to describe one's children that completely condemns the parents' union.
I don't know about being drawn to it because it sounds exotic. That makes me think of an infant being attracted to shiny things.

I actually think it's more of a regional thing. Perhaps most people aren't familiar with the etymology of the term "mulatto." Even so, somehow I still don't find it that offensive but I would still rather be referred to as biracial or mixed. Maybe I'm wrong?

I do remember this one time though, when my brother saw a Dairy Queen commercial for a new "MooLatte" and he got offended, so it must vary from person to person.
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Old 07-08-2008, 02:01 PM   #76
 
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You know Truly, I used to talk to my grandmother in depth about her experiences growing up in the tim period that she did given her background [she is 1/2 chinese and 1/2 black(Jamaican)] and she was born in 1914.

From what she has told me, that down south...being mixed was like being caught between two worlds. The white people treated you better than most "regular" black people, but where cruel enough to always remind you that you are still just a negro. Its like opening the door to a whole new better world but putting a chain on a person so that they can never get beyond the perimeter. Being in that sort of situation made a LOT of people very bitter.
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Old 07-08-2008, 02:04 PM   #77
 
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Originally Posted by Nappy_curly_crown View Post
This is interesting...considering the HISTORY of the term mulatto, that people are embracing it. Where I'm from (down deep deep deeeeeep south) calling someone a mulatto is like calling them a ni$$er, cracker, or even spitting in there face. The term mulatto for ME...will always carry a certain stigma and I can't use it....just like I don't use the term ni&&er or any of its new found variations.
ITA. I think people are drawn to it because it sounds Italian and exotic, but the word basically means a mule; the infertile offspring of two different species, infertile because in nature, different species are not meant to reproduce together. With that knowledge, it would be odd to choose to use a name to describe one's children that completely condemns the parents' union.
Exactly! This is why I've never used that word..its basicly a racial slur!
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Old 07-08-2008, 02:12 PM   #78
 
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I admit sometimes that snobbery is deeply ingrained in me too though. I remember my sister and I rolled our eyes at each other when we heard someone describe Beyonce, (also a creole) as light skinned. Why should we care?! jcurldady, are you creole, and do you think crap like that sometimes? It's automatic, and it's not even my values!
LOL... literally (I've rolled my eyes at that statement too and also thought - why do I care?). I'm from Louisiana and grew up in and around New Orleans so sometimes I have to check myself. Unfortunately so many people from home still think that lighter is better and aren't afraid to say it.

I don't think that any one shade is better than another - we're all just different!
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Old 07-08-2008, 02:17 PM   #79
 
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Cammy, I wonder if I'll ever meet your father. I think yours and mine should join a country club together, lol! INFJ, right? Maybe he can get along with my INTJ dad...?
You probably will meet him at some point lol, and I think they'd get along great, and start a new hate group made up of middle aged black men, the first of its kind lol. They just hate everyone lol. Also, my dad used to date a Korean woman, during the Korean war, and I think your dad is married to one? They have a TON in common lol!

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In regards to this thread, I have two black parents but my skin tone is very light. My mother's side is made up of mulattos, my father's side is strictly black. My mother has straight hair, my grandmother has straight hair, my great-grandmother has straight hair, and then there's me: the only kinky girl in the family, lol. A lot of people ask me if I'm "mixed," because my eyes and nose don't look "traditionally black." Growing up, it always pissed me off when people asked me if I was. I felt that looking "white-ish" got in the way of my proud "blackness." But now...it seems a little silly how hung up everyone gets about race...ANY race. People want to define themselves on something so frivolous, myself included, and reading all of these posts, it just seems so trivial to place so much value on that. So what if you're half white and half black? You're who you want to be, your ethnicity doesn't define who you are. Why get hung up about something so stupid? I'm 1/4th white with a straight nose and kinky nappy hair! I'm happy to be me.
It's hard to explain, but for some reason being mistaken for biracial irritated me too growing up. There was a girl in my younger brother's grade who was almost IDENTICAL to me, who was half Mexican. She had a HUGE crush on him, but had never seen me, so she had no idea how little of a chance she had lol. For some reason at that point there were like NO mixed black people in that part of Texas, so people just weren't used to seeing black people who were mixed from a long time ago. My sister, who also knew the girl would get annoyed when she would try and get her and my brother to say that they weren't totally black. It really hurt her that they didn't identify that way, even though they were in the same vein appearance-wise but refused to acknowledge any other part. It's different if you don't have a parent who is part of another culture though.

I used to relax my hair when I was, which made it wavy, and I wore it waist-length, and the Mexican girls would sometimes assume I was too, and sit with me automatically, (they tend to be VERY closed off to other races with stuff like that lol), and one day there was a group of them from the grade above me, and they were staring at me. Finally, one came over with a puzzled look on her face and asked me point blank, "Are you Mexican?" When I said "No, black," she turned and went back to discuss me her friends, still staring at me lol. This weirded me out so much, since I think of myself as just black, even though there are a lot of lecherous white guys falling out of the family tree lol. My older brother gets that from Samoans, and my little brother gets asked all the time by Indian from India, but it isn't till you see pictures of yourself that you get why people might think that.

I have a 2nd twin now lol. I have a friend who is half Fillipino, (her family is ranges from the pale kindo to the blackish kind), and half white, (Irish, with super-curly hair). Her 8-year old sister looks more like me than anyone I've ever seen lol. It's seriously like me, at age 8 with brown hair and about 2 shades lighter. My friend was like, "I REALLY liked you instantly, and I couldn't figure out why till I got home and looked at her picture on my desk" lol. I've never met her in person, but just looking at the photos was a Twilight Zone experience lol. I almost feel like I have a little daughter now lol.

I think the reason that regular black people might get offended for being mistaken for something else is because our attitude is like, "Ummm, we come in more than one color." I say black, but if they keep asking I say my dad's side is Louisianna creole, and know what that is I explain it's black mixed with lots of white and sometimes Indian.
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Old 07-08-2008, 02:46 PM   #80
 
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Originally Posted by jeamaria View Post
Anyway, back on the topic of hair products, Curls and Mixed Chicks never came out marketing their products at multiracial audiences to the exclusion of other groups. From the first time I saw either of those sites, there were little lines indicating the products were suitable for others with curly hair, as well as a bunch of testimonials from people who took care to point out they were not mixed.

There is a difference between targeting your product at a specific sector and trying to delineate your desired market segment by hostility towards those you are not aiming at.

The biggest joke with Blended Beauty is that the same non biracial black people she blasts are her main customer base. But maybe the joke is not on Blended Beauty.
Things that make you go hmmmmmm.
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