Oils with high smokepoints prevents heat damage?

So I watched a youtube video trying to learn how to do a blow-out so that I could do a braid out since I won't get the wave pattern I want with my hair in its curly state. The girl said she used grape-seed oil to protect against/prevent heat damage because of its high temperature tolerance. So that leads me to ask is this the main ingredient for success to prevent against heat damage? Finding an oil with a high smoke point? I remember reading somewhere on the hair board that a good heat protectant first ingredient should not be water but using oils is better. Any thoughts? I know it is all a risk in the end but still just curious...
Last relaxer: Nov. 24, 2008
BC: December 19, 2009
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No scientist here but it would seem to me that the smoking point of the oil would be somewhat irrelevant in that the oil would only protect your hair up to a certain point. The heat could potentially damage your hair prior to the "smoking point" of the oil because like with most things (water, gasoline, etc.) each would have it's own boiling point based on the chemical bonds holding them together.

From what I've been able to gather from the internet, oils have a "smoking point" that is reached before they get to their "boiling point". So in theory i guess you could say that using an oil with a high smoking point would be good because once the oil surpasses the smoking point and starts to boil, it in effect will "fry" your hair, but depending on the boiling point of protein bonds, the damaging of the protein bonds may have taken place well before the boiling point of the oil itself.

I hope this helps if only a little....any nappy scientists out there? I'd love a more definitive answer as well!

Last edited by geode; 03-14-2010 at 10:08 AM. Reason: spelling
This is something I really want to know to.

My first thoughts: There are oils with really high smoke points - up to 520. I think oils can offer some protection but not complete protection, especially with that kind of heat.
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Well when you put oils on meat before you cook it that makes it sizzle so I can only imagine what that does to the hair
Grape seed oil can withstand a high amount of heat (450 degrees) before it burns, as opposed to the 250 degrees that Olive oil burns at. Grape seed oil offers some protection, but you still have to use caution by not using high heat settings on your hair. Silicones work better than oils for heat protection, but nothing is 100% effective as you know.

(Please don't kill me for mentioning silicones, but it is the truth lol)
FC you're okay. I was just having a random thought moment. If silicones work better then they do and I just now to strip my hair when I have had my time with it :-). I put heat on my head for the first time in like five or six months for a blowout and I still kept it on a warm setting and only dried it about 80%. I just wanted to know if I was following a good thought process or to abandon ship. I am not trying to get a high smoke/burn point so I can crank the heck out of the heat if I blow dry, rollerset, or flat iron. I still am a no heat when not needed advocate.
Last relaxer: Nov. 24, 2008
BC: December 19, 2009
Products: Whatever works!
this is why when I'm blowing out my hair or flat ironing, I opt for products with cones in them b/c they will help protect your hair....

IMO, if you are going to flat iron, incorporate a product with some thermal protection regardless of the ings b/c it's much easier to remove buildup vs having to chop off heat damaged locks.
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FC you're okay. I was just having a random thought moment. If silicones work better then they do and I just now to strip my hair when I have had my time with it :-). I put heat on my head for the first time in like five or six months for a blowout and I still kept it on a warm setting and only dried it about 80%. I just wanted to know if I was following a good thought process or to abandon ship. I am not trying to get a high smoke/burn point so I can crank the heck out of the heat if I blow dry, rollerset, or flat iron. I still am a no heat when not needed advocate.
Originally Posted by gagirl09
You def had the right idea, and grape seed oil will give you the protection you want

this is why when I'm blowing out my hair or flat ironing, I opt for products with cones in them b/c they will help protect your hair....

IMO, if you are going to flat iron, incorporate a product with some thermal protection regardless of the ings b/c it's much easier to remove buildup vs having to chop off heat damaged locks.
Originally Posted by mzmillion
True!
FC you're okay. I was just having a random thought moment. If silicones work better then they do and I just now to strip my hair when I have had my time with it :-). I put heat on my head for the first time in like five or six months for a blowout and I still kept it on a warm setting and only dried it about 80%. I just wanted to know if I was following a good thought process or to abandon ship. I am not trying to get a high smoke/burn point so I can crank the heck out of the heat if I blow dry, rollerset, or flat iron. I still am a no heat when not needed advocate.
Originally Posted by gagirl09
You should let your hair dry completely before using heat because you'll only boil the water in your hair. After a wash, and you've put in the leave-in and detangled etc, sit under the hood dryer for 20/25 minutes. Then blow dry it straight AFTER putting ona heat protectant.

That's how my stylist does it when she straightens my hair. It's been done like that since my last relaxer in '08. Altho, I haven't straightened my hair since some time last year, I haven't had any heat damage etc.

Contrary to popular belief, I think that one can safely straighten their hair.

Good luck!

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