Go Back   CurlTalk > Hair > All-natural hair care

Like Tree40Likes

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 03-02-2013, 05:03 AM   #21
 
Join Date: Aug 1999
Posts: 54
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ayedee View Post
I don't care whether a product comes from the ethnic section or not. I use what my hair likes which tends to be more natural ingredients. There are many white women on CT who use Shea Moisture for example and love it. and it is black owned company. I have never understood the point of people coming on CT with hair problems and telling us their racial makeup. Especially if they but don't tell us porosity, density, texture as in fine or coarse, or if they are protein sensitive. I don't respond to those threads because it is not like we can say "all people of x race should use y product." so I have no advice to offer.
I think that's because outside of curltalk....the world defines hair texture by the race of the person....porosity, texture, desity etc....are foreign words to most people in regard to hair care
TheCurlyOne is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-16-2013, 01:29 AM   #22
 
SexiAngel's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Posts: 13
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by TheCurlyOne View Post
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ayedee View Post
I don't care whether a product comes from the ethnic section or not. I use what my hair likes which tends to be more natural ingredients. There are many white women on CT who use Shea Moisture for example and love it. and it is black owned company. I have never understood the point of people coming on CT with hair problems and telling us their racial makeup. Especially if they but don't tell us porosity, density, texture as in fine or coarse, or if they are protein sensitive. I don't respond to those threads because it is not like we can say "all people of x race should use y product." so I have no advice to offer.
I think that's because outside of curltalk....the world defines hair texture by the race of the person....porosity, texture, desity etc....are foreign words to most people in regard to hair care
Glad I found this thread. Seems like I agree with all of you. I have mostly 3B hair I think, curl about 1/2 inch diameter left to dry naturally, but dry and course, very porous also. Some of my hair in back at neck level is 3C and possible 4A the coils are so tight in a small place. I have bought stuff from the ethnic section and got funny looks and comments, some worked, some didn't. Example Carols Daughter something milk.......... well it was really nasty on my hair no matter how much or little I used, it just wasn't for me. Sally's has some Proclaim brand stuff I like but they put it in the ethnic section also. You just have to play around and see what works for you. I like the shea butter products, coconut oils, and other moisturuzers, but I can't use them every day also or I get to oily.
SexiAngel is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-19-2013, 12:21 PM   #23
 
bosanbo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Posts: 180
Default

My man took one look at my KCCC and said something to this effect. I kinda had to slap that one down... He's normally so good, but I think the word "kinky" was what got him confused. It's also funny that he's so observant of my beauty routines.

It's so hard for me to not go off on some genetics-happy rambling right here (I'm an anthropologist). People out there in the world assume way too much about how genetics work, when it's really a lot more messy - especially with things like skin and eye color and hair texture. Those are less an "on/off" switch than they are a "big sloppy pile of blending paint blobs." If you're not a "blobby" person, you never really think about it until you see someone doing something "blobby" (like a Caucasian woman buying "African American" hair oil). Yay for blobby people!

I think what we're seeing, too, is a style of marketing that is thankfully falling out of fashion. Putting a type of face on a product is a strategy to get consumers to think "Oh, it's for people like me." This is incredibly 1950's - just look for the blond housewife with the white smile!

Brands (well, the smart ones) are starting to do a lot less of that and a lot more work building a culture around their products. Interestingly, I've noticed that a lot of products favored by CGers are this kind of savvy, or completely blase and neutral (V05, Suave). Jessicurl, Devacurl, and Botanical Spirits (to name a few) clearly send the message "we're a group of people, come be a part of it, we want you to fit in here" instead of "if you look like this, you will get results with this gel."

So... yay for savvy marketing. It's almost always linked to better products, too, since the branding falls flat if the products don't work/aren't enjoyable.
__________________
I sort of blog
I'm mostly away doing field work through mid-May.

Hair: curlybob, fine, dense, low-po, big waves/ringlets (2C/3A)
Co-Wash: Nature's Gate Herbal Conditioner
RO: YTC Carrot, Aubrey Organics GPB
LI: BS Shea Soft Styling Cream (HG)
Styling: KCCC, Garnier P&C Gel
1xWeek: low-poo, gelatin PT or Joico K-Pak
Hair Likes: aloe, coconut oil, humidity, protein, long walks on the beach
bosanbo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-11-2013, 06:17 PM   #24
 
BeautyisMiree's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Posts: 202
Default

There is no such thing as "black" hair. Most products out their are meant to cater to your hair type not skin color.

It's not a big deal because there are days I buy some hair care products for straight hair when mine is curly. It just depends on what your hair needs/wants.
BeautyisMiree is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-18-2013, 11:43 PM   #25
 
gloria25's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Posts: 35
Default Thanks!

I've enjoyed reading this thread. I was actually wondering this very question, as I'm new to CG and to scouring the hair product section for something new and free of the ingredients I'm avoiding, while being nourishing for my hair.

I am not new to looking outside the box in terms of health, parenting, and family planning, so going naturally wavy is sort of another natural extension of my choosing to to be a little counter-cultural, or actually, just more true to myself.

Anyway, I was thinking maybe there was something I didn't know about "black" hair products, although I do know that black people do not all have the same hair types, of course. And so my inkling was that I could probably find some black hair products that would be awesome on my hair, and if I did, I wouldn't give a care if someone questioned me or said something about it. I'd just tell them, "It's full of great ingredients. I think it's going to be great for my hair!" Or, "I think it's just what I need!"

So I'm glad to hear it confirmed that, while there are some products marketed to black people which have heavy waxes or oils that I would want to avoid, there are also some nourishing and CG friendly products that I might want to try out! And I agree with those of you who feel annoyance at the marketing factor. To hear you all confirm it that way opens my eyes further about the way marketing works. I really thought there might be something that I didn't know or understand about black hair in general and therefore why there was a different section in the grocery store for those items, but now I see it as manipulation and, in a way, segregation. It seems like, from stories people have shared from their friends' and families' reactions, some people of all colors continue to perpetuate that segregation, even if they don't mean to.
__________________
Started embracing the 2b waves in March 2013. I can't believe how immediate the difference, when I stopped using sulfates! Now I need guidance on most everything else.
My best guess so far at my hair profile: 2b, medium porosity, fine and med width strands, low-to-med density, medium length.
gloria25 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-22-2013, 11:37 PM   #26
 
fihe's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Posts: 55
Default

I recently won a bunch of "ethnic" hair care products as part of a contest, so I've been using some stuff lately that I've never used before. Admittedly, not all of the hair products work for me, especially since I have rather thin hair, but I've discovered some new things that are helpful to me, such as hair lotion and sheen spray. The hair lotion actually makes my sticking-up frizzies on the side of my head stay down, whereas my L'oréal anti-frizz serum did NOTHING for it. I've also found that just a little sheen spray, and the deep conditioner used about once weekly, work nicely for my hair! So what if the women on the package don't look like me? (Well, many of them actually look racially ambiguous, but I don't. Lol.)

Quote:
Originally Posted by gloria25 View Post
So I'm glad to hear it confirmed that, while there are some products marketed to black people which have heavy waxes or oils that I would want to avoid, there are also some nourishing and CG friendly products that I might want to try out! And I agree with those of you who feel annoyance at the marketing factor. To hear you all confirm it that way opens my eyes further about the way marketing works. I really thought there might be something that I didn't know or understand about black hair in general and therefore why there was a different section in the grocery store for those items, but now I see it as manipulation and, in a way, segregation. It seems like, from stories people have shared from their friends' and families' reactions, some people of all colors continue to perpetuate that segregation, even if they don't mean to.
Yes! End hair product segregation!
curlypearl likes this.
__________________
mostly 2a hair, fine, medium density, low porosity?
My hair blog!

Last edited by fihe; 04-22-2013 at 11:45 PM.
fihe is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-30-2013, 05:16 PM   #27
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Posts: 3,594
Default

I have purchased from brands marketed towards different ethnic groups and will again, also watch African American curlies on YouTube. I figure the 'black' natural community is years ahead on caring for and taming dry and curly hair compared with the Caucasian community so I'd be nuts not to benefit from their experience. I like the use of certain natural ingredients in some brands, such as aloe and coconut oil, and I don't really see it as any different to shopping in the World Foods section of the grocery store or going to an Asian grocery store. My 2b hair won't take waxes and butters so I avoid most of the styling creams and whatnot.
curlypearl likes this.
Firefox7275 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-30-2013, 05:46 PM   #28
 
CrazyCatLady's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Posts: 64
Default

Forget if a product is marketed to Black women, white women, teens, curlies, straight hair, or even men. If a product has the right ingredients and does what you need - use it!
curlypearl likes this.
CrazyCatLady is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-05-2013, 10:44 AM   #29
 
jmartinez's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Posts: 120
Default

Lol agreed with both of you. Hair care products are really just like lotion and soap. The same for all people, but come in varieties like dry skin oily skin, etc. everything cant be segregated by skin color. It would be like trying to make tooth paste for different groups of people based on race. A big waste of money to keep the whole myth of segregated hair products.

Sent from my SPH-L710 using CurlTalk App
jmartinez is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-05-2013, 02:04 PM   #30
 
chupie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Posts: 1,970
Default

I went to school with a pale, freckled English descendant girl who had THE kinkiest curliest hair I've ever seen before or since.
chupie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-05-2013, 02:11 PM   #31
 
lcl0706's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Posts: 954
Default

^^ me too. it was gorgeous. she of course didnt like it. but I thought it was beautiful and unique.
__________________
fine, thin, normal/(low?) porosity. Mod-CG. Usually I can't co-wash more than 1x a week, & sometimes I have to use T-Gel in rotation due to scalp issues.

Co-wash: VO5 Volumizing
Poo: Giovanni 50:50
RO:TN, Nexxus Youth Renewal, Alba Coconut
LI: KCKT
PT: gelatin PT, ION EC
Stylers: Giovanni mousse, TIGI Curls Rock amplifier (a-cone), Curls Rock Strong Hold Mousse
Gels: SCC spray gel

lcl0706 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-01-2013, 12:41 AM   #32
 
Join Date: May 2013
Posts: 152
Default

I use Softee coconut oil cream stuff. It was like a dollar and a tiny bit makes my " white girl hair" nice and shiny. My roommate is black and she thinks it's hilarious that we use some of the same products. Oh well! It works :P
Purplecurls17 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-06-2013, 08:31 PM   #33
 
KiraSavannah's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2013
Posts: 415
Default

Agree,

Sent from my SGH-T999 using CurlTalk App
__________________
CG/LOC Method's 3b/3c hair SL-Curly/ Goal-MBL Curly
Weekly Poo/Low Poo: some Shea M Poo.
Weekly Deep Treat-Dermorganic Intensive Hair Masque
Bi-Weekly RO:Tresseme Naturals - V.Smooth/N.Moisture
Daily Leave in:Shea Moisture Extra Moisture Detangler
Daily Oil: Olive Oil & Conut Oil Mix
Daily Styler: Shea Moisture Curl & Style Milk
KiraSavannah is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-06-2013, 08:33 PM   #34
 
KiraSavannah's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2013
Posts: 415
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by adthomas View Post
I don't care whether a product comes from the ethnic section or not. I use what my hair likes which tends to be more natural ingredients. There are many white women on CT who use Shea Moisture for example and love it. and it is black owned company. I have never understood the point of people coming on CT with hair problems and telling us their racial makeup. Especially if they but don't tell us porosity, density, texture as in fine or coarse, or if they are protein sensitive. I don't respond to those threads because it is not like we can say "all people of x race should use y product." so I have no advice to offer.
Agree, although at my stores recently, they put SheaMoisture out of the ethnic hair group, but maybe because its all natural and different ethnic groups use it

Sent from my SGH-T999 using CurlTalk App
__________________
CG/LOC Method's 3b/3c hair SL-Curly/ Goal-MBL Curly
Weekly Poo/Low Poo: some Shea M Poo.
Weekly Deep Treat-Dermorganic Intensive Hair Masque
Bi-Weekly RO:Tresseme Naturals - V.Smooth/N.Moisture
Daily Leave in:Shea Moisture Extra Moisture Detangler
Daily Oil: Olive Oil & Conut Oil Mix
Daily Styler: Shea Moisture Curl & Style Milk
KiraSavannah is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-26-2013, 11:12 AM   #35
 
Marci Pie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Posts: 559
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by ElizabethFaith View Post
I think stores need to rename the "ethnic" section to the "curly" section. Because anyone with curly hair (Anglo, African American, Asian, or Hispanic) can benefit from using the products that are placed in the ethnic section. I knew someone who had curly hair (she was Caucasian) and her hair was very dry, but she would not purchase any of the products that were in the ethnic section because she said that they were for black people.
I can't agree more! I use WHATEVER works!
__________________

3b, Medium-Coarse (slight coarse charactericstics), Normal porosity & Low elasticity per Curl Wizard Profile.
Low-poo: Nourish Shampoo
Co-wash: Suave, Vo5, HE, Aussie Moist
Deep Conditioner: GVP Conditioning Balm
Leave-in: Nourish Conditioner (Trader Joe's)
Stylers: LA Looks Sports, Coconut Oil, Almond Oil, Jojoba Oil.
Methods: Wet plop or pineapple at night, diffuse in the morning. Scrunch w/joboba, coconut or almond oil.
Marci Pie is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply
Trending Topics[-]hide

Thread Tools
Display Modes



Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On



All times are GMT -6. The time now is 03:05 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2011 NaturallyCurly.com