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-   -   Most moisturizing hair mask/conditioner you've found? (http://www.naturallycurly.com/curltalk/general-discussion-about-curly-hair/159210-most-moisturizing-hair-mask-conditioner-youve-found.html)

Fluffy01 06-11-2013 06:55 AM

Most moisturizing hair mask/conditioner you've found?
 
I'm super sensitive to any protein and don't really use silicones, but I'd reconsider the silicones if my hair would just look decent. Something happened with my hormones after pregnancy and now my hair is a fluff ball no matter what I do. I even tried olive oil!!! It soaked it up like nothing lol. Okay, not really, but I didn't notice any difference, so I assume that it didn't help a bit.

Thanks for the suggestions...for the record, I've been using Devacurl and sheamoisture products...oh and the AO Honeysuckle Rose condish.

Firefox7275 06-11-2013 07:42 AM

Seems like a silly question but what do you mean by moisturising? Neither olive oil nor silicones add moisture (humectants = water) they repel water so are more like anti humectants. If your hair has changed, maybe it's response to proteins has too?

Are you considering your hair properties and humidity/ dew points in your choice of products? You products contain glycerin and shea butter, either of those cause problems for some curlies.

Fluffy01 06-11-2013 08:34 AM

I have low porosity hair. I don't color it, heat style much, etc. Protein constricts the cuticle even further preventing even more moisture from entering. It gives me frizz. If anything my hair became even more less porous after pregnancy. It has never ever held moisture well unless I had my hair short. For some reason, my shorter curls always looked fabulous. :afro:

If I can't use oils or silicones...or glycerin...then what am I left with to moisturize my hair? The oils worked in the past...I mean my hair felt moisturized.

I live in a high dewpoint area...South Carolina.

Firefox7275 06-11-2013 09:42 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Fluffy01 (Post 2179108)
I have low porosity hair. I don't color it, heat style much, etc. Protein constricts the cuticle even further preventing even more moisture from entering. It gives me frizz. If anything my hair became even more less porous after pregnancy. It has never ever held moisture well unless I had my hair short. For some reason, my shorter curls always looked fabulous. :afro:

If I can't use oils or silicones...or glycerin...then what am I left with to moisturize my hair? The oils worked in the past...I mean my hair felt moisturized.

I live in a high dewpoint area...South Carolina.

I didn't suggest you cannot use oils, simply that they do not add moisture. Ingredients that may help your hair feel in better condition (assume this is what you mean by feeling moisturised?) include panthenol, ceramides, cationic surfactants and fatty alcohols, anything at pH 4.5 to 5.5.

Many curlies have problems with glycerin in high dew points so might be worth experimenting with a glycerin free routine; shea butter does not penetrate and can build up so you might clarify (or chelate if you have hard water/ go swimming).

Pheebie 06-11-2013 10:48 AM

Jessicurl Deep Treatment is my favorite. I've tried so many masks & deep conditioners and nothing compares to this one.

curry curls 06-11-2013 11:06 AM

Once a week I use Sally Beauty's GVP conditioning balm and add hemp oil to it. I leave it on for an hour. My hair is loving it. :)

tycho19 06-11-2013 11:10 AM

Dermorganic masque.

Fluffy01 06-11-2013 12:24 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Firefox7275 (Post 2179146)
Quote:

Originally Posted by Fluffy01 (Post 2179108)
I have low porosity hair. I don't color it, heat style much, etc. Protein constricts the cuticle even further preventing even more moisture from entering. It gives me frizz. If anything my hair became even more less porous after pregnancy. It has never ever held moisture well unless I had my hair short. For some reason, my shorter curls always looked fabulous. :afro:

If I can't use oils or silicones...or glycerin...then what am I left with to moisturize my hair? The oils worked in the past...I mean my hair felt moisturized.

I live in a high dewpoint area...South Carolina.

I didn't suggest you cannot use oils, simply that they do not add moisture. Ingredients that may help your hair feel in better condition (assume this is what you mean by feeling moisturised?) include panthenol, ceramides, cationic surfactants and fatty alcohols, anything at pH 4.5 to 5.5.

Many curlies have problems with glycerin in high dew points so might be worth experimenting with a glycerin free routine; shea butter does not penetrate and can build up so you might clarify (or chelate if you have hard water/ go swimming).

This is great info...thanks! Where do you find out the ph of products? I mean most products don't even list it right? Thanks again!

Firefox7275 06-11-2013 01:33 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Fluffy01 (Post 2179239)
This is great info...thanks! Where do you find out the ph of products? I mean most products don't even list it right? Thanks again!

You can e-mail the company, Google just in case someone else has tested or asked (see below), or purchase some pH test strips for any products you already own. If they say 'pH balanced' that often means neutral or 7. Komaza Care and As I Am brands offer lower pH haircare products.

The Scoop on Vinegar
THE NATURAL HAVEN: pH of Shampoo : The Ultimate List!
THE NATURAL HAVEN: pH of Conditioners
THE NATURAL HAVEN: pH of Leave In Conditioners and Styling Aids

wavydaze 06-11-2013 05:04 PM

i do extra virgin coconut oil deep treatments. I find coconut oil to be very moisturizing.... Firefox... you're saying that oils don't moisturize? I always get confused about this. I always thought they did, or at least coconut oil does.

jennag 06-11-2013 08:07 PM

I also have very sensitive, coarse hair I have been experimenting with. I just gave up on coconut oil, my hair actually started breaking and just got oily and looked dirty, even with only using the smallest amount. Olive oil was ok, but still looked oily. Shea butter was better, but still not right. Any proteins were awful. I am playing with jojoba, grapeseed and avocado oil, but I have to be so careful. I would love a DT and LI that keeps moisture better.

rainboe 06-11-2013 10:01 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by wavydaze (Post 2179343)
i do extra virgin coconut oil deep treatments. I find coconut oil to be very moisturizing.... Firefox... you're saying that oils don't moisturize? I always get confused about this. I always thought they did, or at least coconut oil does.

I agree, I've always heard oils are moisturizing, and my Hair gets moisturized by Products containing oils. Humectants are also useful for drying in moisture. i live in a high dew point area, and I can still use them without problems. Especially oils like coconut oil, that are suppose to penetrate the hair shaft. Also, all oils can seal moisture into the hair, protecting it from the elements drying it out.

For me, pH isn't an important factor or hair care. I'm pretty sure the pH of conditioners usually screws slightly acidic.

Firefox7275 06-11-2013 10:22 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by wavydaze (Post 2179343)
i do extra virgin coconut oil deep treatments. I find coconut oil to be very moisturizing.... Firefox... you're saying that oils don't moisturize? I always get confused about this. I always thought they did, or at least coconut oil does.

I wonder if you are mixing up 'moisturising' with conditioning or emollience. Moisturising means increasing water (= moisture), oils repel water it is humectants that attract water. Deep treatments with coconut oil work by the lauric acid penetrating and reducing porosity, coating the hair in a thin layer of fatty acids and increasing elasticity so overall your hair may feel in better condition. The anti humectant property is not a bad thing as it might sound, you don't actually want too much water in the hair.

Some oils can form a semi permeable 'seal' so that water held by other moisturising ingredients (in a conditioner say) remains in the hair for a little longer, coconut is not the best for sealing. Oh, the exception is castor oil that does apparently have some humectant properties so can moisturise if used within a formula.

Purplecurls17 06-11-2013 11:41 PM

I'm searching for a deep treatment method too! It's so hard because my hair fluctuates with the weather ( I live in New England do the weather is wicked shifty!)
If you want something cheap I liked Aussie deeep treatment and I'm kinda into my two Garnier ones, although I an not super impressed. They have comes though. I'm mod CG so they don't bother me.

wavydaze 06-12-2013 09:57 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Firefox7275 (Post 2179425)
I wonder if you are mixing up 'moisturising' with conditioning or emollience. Moisturising means increasing water (= moisture), oils repel water it is humectants that attract water. Deep treatments with coconut oil work by the lauric acid penetrating and reducing porosity, coating the hair in a thin layer of fatty acids and increasing elasticity so overall your hair may feel in better condition. The anti humectant property is not a bad thing as it might sound, you don't actually want too much water in the hair.

Yes, i've always thought of moisturizing and conditioning the same thing. How much water should be in your hair anyway?

I'm still confused though... when we talk about dry hair, it's not like water is the solution. Conditioning would be the solution, right? (Of course, having proper protein would also help keep hair from losing moisture.)

Jessiebanana 06-12-2013 11:00 AM

It's a semantics game, whether something is adding moisture or sealing it, if the end result is less dry hair I don't care and I'm guilty of using these words interchangeably.

Humectant is important to distinguish because it's drawing moisture from the air...or your hair/

Coconut oil helping your hair retain protein versus a PT actually adding protein isn't as important to me since I'm protein sensitive and result is the same...might be more important to someone who has damaged hair and needs protein.


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