Be careful about mega doses of Biotin, any supplements

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Hi everyone!

I just wanted to tell you that I talked to my doctor about taking biotin supplements and he warned me against taking mega doses of biotin or any mega dose of any vitamin, in fact. They can actually have harmful health effects.

A multivitamin that included biotin was recommended instead. If anyone is interested, I picked up Metropolitan Market (health/organic grocery) Food Based Women's multi, which has 300 mcg or 100% daily value of biotin. To contrast I know I've seen some Hair/Skin/Nails formulas that have 3,000 mcg of biotin and I've also seen High Potency Biotin formulas that have as much as 10,000 mcg of biotin.

Please talk to your doctor before starting any high potency or mega doses of any supplement.

Thank you for your attention; stay healthy curlies!
fine - low/normal porosity - medium density - normal elasticity.

Currently using:
Cowash: Cure Care diluted with water 1:1
RO: Cure Care, V05 Kiwi Lime
Styler: UFD CM (old formula), FSG + CNPF
PT: IAgirl's gelatine

Experimenting with: no guar hydroxypropyltrimonium chloride, gelatin gel

Recent findings: my hair likes Cure Care diluted with water as a cowash; does NOT like guar h.c.!

iherb discount code: CFN646
You definitely have to know what you are doing. Too much of anything isnt good.
Unfortunately, most drs actually know very little about vitamins/minerals. They simply arent taught it in med school. And most of the testing for vitamin/minerals is highly inadequate and at times an inaccurate depiction of what's really going on in the body. Need specialized testing that most insurance doesnt cover and most drs dont even know about.
A naturopath, integrative or functional medicine dr will know. Thankfully we can find a lot of great info online if you know where to look.

With biotin, you need to make sure to get all the other B vitamins because they all work together and too much of one will throw the others out of balance. According to Suzy Cohen, pharmacist, functional medicine dr and author, in her book Drug Muggers, up to 100mcg-5000mcg biotin is considered a safe dose depending on your current health needs (if you take medication that depletes biotin, you need more than someone who doesnt take a drug mugger)
Excess biotin is eliminated in the urine and it appears to be non-toxic dven when taken in high doses (up to 5000mcg a day)
Ondulee, ButterCurl and pdxdonna like this.
I wouldn't bother talking to a doctor about supplements and minerals.

If you are healthy go and see a sports nutritionist. If you are not see a nurse and if you have hair loss see a trichologist.

Sports nutritionists and scientists deal with healthy people which is an entire different area of medicine. A few years ago I was talking about some research on heart rates I read from a leading sports scientist to a doctor friend. She was puzzled and did some digging and found what they were being taught was completely different to what the sports scientist was saying due to the different populations the research on the subject had taken place in.

Nurses tend to take time to enquire about a patients entire lifestyle and so are less likely to miss obvious clues like heavy periods and working in an office. If it was not for a nurse I would have seriously damaged health by now as she could see I was serverly Vitamin D deficient yet the 3 doctors I saw within the 8 months before couldn't work out my symptoms didn't match the original condition they were treating me for. (Vitamin D is fat soluble so stored in the body.)

Tricologists deal with hair loss and unlike doctors know the optimum range that iron, vitamin D and certain other vitamins/minerals need to be to stop it if that is one of the factors.
You definitely have to know what you are doing. Too much of anything isnt good.
Unfortunately, most drs actually know very little about vitamins/minerals. They simply arent taught it in med school. And most of the testing for vitamin/minerals is highly inadequate and at times an inaccurate depiction of what's really going on in the body.
Originally Posted by crimsonshedemon
Thankfully we can find a lot of great info online if you know where to look.
Originally Posted by crimsonshedemon
I fundamentally disagree. I don't know why I would trust Dr. Google over someone who actually attended med school, residency and has years of experience practicing medicine, and who is also keeping up with the latest medical research. Yes, there are data gaps concerning vitamins, but if doctors and researchers don't know about the safety of certain things like high potency vitamins... why would someone else online (could be anyone) know better than MDs?

If there are data gaps, perhaps it's best to practice caution.

This was a recent and relevant news article re: mega doses. Vitamins: Too much of a not-so-good thing? - CNN.com
fine - low/normal porosity - medium density - normal elasticity.

Currently using:
Cowash: Cure Care diluted with water 1:1
RO: Cure Care, V05 Kiwi Lime
Styler: UFD CM (old formula), FSG + CNPF
PT: IAgirl's gelatine

Experimenting with: no guar hydroxypropyltrimonium chloride, gelatin gel

Recent findings: my hair likes Cure Care diluted with water as a cowash; does NOT like guar h.c.!

iherb discount code: CFN646
Join Date: May 2012
Posts: 939
I wouldn't necessarily trust Dr. Google, but most traditionally trained medical professionals are woefully ignorant in this area. I would agree that a nutritionist or someone in sports medicine would have more useful information.
ButterCurl likes this.
I'm of two minds about this. Firstly let me just say that food and health are interests of mine. I love to cook, and I love to learn the history of a food and how it's been prepared or used in the past for both nourishment and even medicinal purposes. Ex: If you're run down with a cold, trying fixing yourself a cabbage salad. Or maybe chopping up some fresh garlic nice and fine, led it seep with a bit of olive oil and Italian seasoning, and then spreading it on some warm toast. Sidenote--If you're worried about bad breath just gargle with lemon juice. It kills the halitosis.

It is TOTALLY true that medical doctors have very little education regarding nutrition. My friend is a medical doctor (graduated from UCLA) and my other good friend is in Columbia medical school. My best friend is also an RN. Point is, my friends are smart cookies--but I've illuminated all of them a few times when I mention this food is great for this and this food is good for that. And the way they're being/have been taught is that if someone comes in with a medical condition that is reversible through lifestyle changes (read: exercise and DIET), they just put them on prescription medication. There's not as much emphasis to encourage the person to make a lifestyle change. And to quote my doctor friend, "You're assuming the person is going to change and they probably won't, so you just put them on the medication right away." I'm sorry but that's seriously backwards thinking and totally indicative of why the United States's health problems are spiraling out of control. (I realize there are a LOT of factors here, especially socioeconomical--such as people of lesser means having no access to fresh produce and their neighborhoods being inundated with fast food joints and having little to no education on nutrition or safe places to exercise to begin with, but I'm just saying that this attitude medical professionals are being indoctrinated with in medical school is totally not helping. And it makes me very angry.)

I've also read a lot that has led me to believe that most of the research about mega doses of vitamins being "bad for you" is cherry picked and they ignore studies and evidence to the contrary. However, there are a ton of not so savory additives in store bought vitamins and herbs that, IMO, makes them well worth avoiding. Acrylamides, maltodextrin from GM corn--hell, did you know that nearly all of the vitamin C supplements are derived from MG corn? btw, carrageenan, I could do on... So while I've been taking a hair skin nails multivitamin as of late, I prefer to get the bulk of my vitamins naturally. I eat tons of leafy greens and fruit, and avoid white bread and fried foods. I don't eat out that often because I don't trust anybody else's kitchen. And I get most of my "megadoses" of vitamins from my juicer or my blender. For instance, yesterday I drank my weight in kale. Two heads' worth.

So I think if you can get it naturally, it's better. But I will say that I've never experienced any negative reaction thus far to any supplement I've taken. Not that I've taken a ton, but you know. Over the years. I recently went off the hair, skin nail vitamins I was taking because I finished up the bottle and my hair has grown to a length I'm totally happy with. I no longer have to shave my legs everyday, too, which is a plus because that was a pain. I didn't feel the need to consult a doctor. Still don't. And yeah, I'd rather talk to a nutritionist if was worried. Anyways, I like to take my health into my own hands. I don't believe everything I read off the internet, but seeing as how I sample from a wide variety of resources: books, magazines, NPR, newspapers, and the web, I think I'm pretty good at filtering out some of the hype and hyperbole.

BTW--CNN's reporting of health/nutrition is a bit spotty. Not to dismiss it outright but just as illustration: I remember there being a story a few years ago about certain vegetables being contaminated with pesticides and the news reporter questioning the talking head actually uttered the question, "So does this mean we just shouldn't eat vegetables anymore?" I was at the gym and almost rolled off the treadmill.
turquoisecurls and ButterCurl like this.
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CG since Nov. 2012

Poos: SM Moisture Retention + Yucca Baobab, TJ's Tea Tree Tingle
Condish: TJ 'sTea Tree Tingle*, SM Moisture Retention* + Curl & Shine + Yucca Baobab, Yes to Blueberries
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Sealers: Jojoba* or Grapeseed* oil

* = HG


Last edited by dusalocks; 08-10-2013 at 02:00 PM.
I appreciate your responses but I don't want to get too much into healthcare in America and nutrition and preventive medicine, alternative medicine and many tangential topics, because that is for another time.

Not everyone is qualified to filter information correctly... I wouldn't actually feel truly qualified unless I myself had ideally an MD topped off with PhD in nutrition. Hooray I'd be in school forever!

I don't really bother much with CNN nowadays but I still think this article was relevant. Mostly the points were that we don't know whether mega doses are healthy and there are mega doses that are actually quite unhealthy (vitamin A + beta carotene that were found to be linked to a greater risk of death from lung cancer). That's not CNN making up stuff, just reporting on research.

The point is, if there are data gaps, those data gaps are universal. No one has access, not you or me or a sports nutritionist or a functional medicine doctor or a phD in nutrition. If the research doesn't exist, it doesn't exist. So perhaps caution isn't a bad idea.
fine - low/normal porosity - medium density - normal elasticity.

Currently using:
Cowash: Cure Care diluted with water 1:1
RO: Cure Care, V05 Kiwi Lime
Styler: UFD CM (old formula), FSG + CNPF
PT: IAgirl's gelatine

Experimenting with: no guar hydroxypropyltrimonium chloride, gelatin gel

Recent findings: my hair likes Cure Care diluted with water as a cowash; does NOT like guar h.c.!

iherb discount code: CFN646
I agree with that, I just saying it is up to the person's own discretion. Sorry for going off on tangent--it's just there's a LOT of gray area that needs to be covered and I always feel the need to concede this or mention that, lest it sound like I'm leaving something out. I just feel like hey, I'm a grown woman, I'm an educated woman, and my health is my own hands. This is who I trust, this is why. I don't doubt your doctor's advice is sound and I think it's great you're exercising caution. It's your body. And I don't mean to dismiss the article outright either. I too have read a lot on the subject. Right now most of the research is saying any megadose of a vitamin is bad for you, with the exception of vitamin D which is all the rage. But like I said, just my POV.
3A - C, HP, ME, HD. (Coarse, High Porosity, Medium Elasticity, High Density.)

CG since Nov. 2012

Poos: SM Moisture Retention + Yucca Baobab, TJ's Tea Tree Tingle
Condish: TJ 'sTea Tree Tingle*, SM Moisture Retention* + Curl & Shine + Yucca Baobab, Yes to Blueberries
Stylers: KCKT*, SM Curl Enhancing Smoothie* + Curl & Style Milk*, KCCC*, FSG*, CJ Pattern Pusha, Curl Keeper
Sealers: Jojoba* or Grapeseed* oil

* = HG

This is the most well stated shut down I've seen in a long time. Very mature response!


I appreciate your responses but I don't want to get too much into healthcare in America and nutrition and preventive medicine, alternative medicine and many tangential topics, because that is for another time.

Not everyone is qualified to filter information correctly... I wouldn't actually feel truly qualified unless I myself had ideally an MD topped off with PhD in nutrition. Hooray I'd be in school forever!

I don't really bother much with CNN nowadays but I still think this article was relevant. Mostly the points were that we don't know whether mega doses are healthy and there are mega doses that are actually quite unhealthy (vitamin A + beta carotene that were found to be linked to a greater risk of death from lung cancer). That's not CNN making up stuff, just reporting on research.

The point is, if there are data gaps, those data gaps are universal. No one has access, not you or me or a sports nutritionist or a functional medicine doctor or a phD in nutrition. If the research doesn't exist, it doesn't exist. So perhaps caution isn't a bad idea.
Originally Posted by wavydaze


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Okay, now I feel silly because it sounds like I was offering something really aggressive/offensive that was in need of being shutdown in the first place. To be clear, I totally did not mean to dismiss wavydaze's opinion or her warning to exercise caution. (I definitely don't claim to be an expert. I'm just interested.) And I really like wavydaze and all of her contributions to the forum. I think she's highly educated, well researched, and a very nice person. I myself been a bit ruffled by other people's responses that I have deemed to be less than congenial or outright dismissive, and I really did not mean to come off that way. I was trying to split the difference actually, because, yes, I don't think medical doctors in general know enough about nutrition and are the best professionals to consult, but I have other concerns regarding vitamins and supplements. . . mostly regarding contamination and toxins.
3A - C, HP, ME, HD. (Coarse, High Porosity, Medium Elasticity, High Density.)

CG since Nov. 2012

Poos: SM Moisture Retention + Yucca Baobab, TJ's Tea Tree Tingle
Condish: TJ 'sTea Tree Tingle*, SM Moisture Retention* + Curl & Shine + Yucca Baobab, Yes to Blueberries
Stylers: KCKT*, SM Curl Enhancing Smoothie* + Curl & Style Milk*, KCCC*, FSG*, CJ Pattern Pusha, Curl Keeper
Sealers: Jojoba* or Grapeseed* oil

* = HG

I have many doctors in my family, and doctors don't know everything and they do make mistakes. Sometimes they insist something is true because that is what they believe they see, even when what they believe isn't what they're seeing at all. Just like regular people. And sometimes google is pretty useful, if you know how to sort out the BS.

My belief is that you should always look to diet first. Always. Nutrients in food work together, whereas pills don't. I also don't think that most of the time you can adequately gauge how supplements work anyway, because hair doesn't grow in absolutes. It grows fast, it grows slow, shed increases and lessens, and it's often just because. So if you take a supplement and experience rapid growth, whether or not the supplement actually caused the growth is impossible to know for sure. Lately my nails have been growing very fast. I'm not taking any supplements other than what I always take (vitamin D because I do have a diagnosed deficiency, and milk thistle for my gallbladder), and my diet is pretty much the same, so why the increased growth? Dunno, except that sometimes they grow faster and sometimes slower.

I know more about proper nutrition in pets, but the general principle is the same--nutrition is always better in whole food form. Trying to recreate real food through the use of supplements (or manufactured diets) never comes close to the real deal.
3a/b, F, normal porosity

Wash with either Suave Tropical Coconut, As I Am, or CJ Daily Fix
Condition with STC or Yes to Blueberries and detangle with Denman, rinse very lightly (baptismal rinse)
Add LAL gel, either Sport or Wet Look, scrunch with flour sack towel, and plop
Diffuse 5 minutes, then air dry
I agree with that, I just saying it is up to the person's own discretion. Sorry for going off on tangent--it's just there's a LOT of gray area that needs to be covered and I always feel the need to concede this or mention that, lest it sound like I'm leaving something out. I just feel like hey, I'm a grown woman, I'm an educated woman, and my health is my own hands. This is who I trust, this is why. I don't doubt your doctor's advice is sound and I think it's great you're exercising caution. It's your body. And I don't mean to dismiss the article outright either. I too have read a lot on the subject. Right now most of the research is saying any megadose of a vitamin is bad for you, with the exception of vitamin D which is all the rage. But like I said, just my POV.
Originally Posted by dusalocks
Mega doses of Vitamin D as a dietary supplement are bad for you though unless you have a proven deficiency. While the only toxic reports come from a couple of people who have taken too much as a dietary supplement rather than sitting in the sun and a study on rats, its stored the body so high supplement levels can be dangerous.

I actually now have to monitor my blood level of Vitamin D for the rest of my life even though I'm now on a dose current scientific research on humans says is fine.

Even the advocates of taking large doses of vitamin D who are in good health before they took it state clearly you need to monitor your blood level to make sure it doesn't get too high.

Likewise people I know with various anaemias have to have regular blood tests to check they aren't taking too much or too little of their supplements.

Which is why I don't understand why people blindly take more than the recommended daily amounts without doing their own research first if they are capable, or talking to a qualified person.

There are vitamins and minerals that you simply will excrete if you take more than needed but if you don't know what they are then you are either wasting money or putting you health at risk.
Hi everyone!

I just wanted to tell you that I talked to my doctor about taking biotin supplements and he warned me against taking mega doses of biotin or any mega dose of any vitamin, in fact. They can actually have harmful health effects.

A multivitamin that included biotin was recommended instead. If anyone is interested, I picked up Metropolitan Market (health/organic grocery) Food Based Women's multi, which has 300 mcg or 100% daily value of biotin. To contrast I know I've seen some Hair/Skin/Nails formulas that have 3,000 mcg of biotin and I've also seen High Potency Biotin formulas that have as much as 10,000 mcg of biotin.

Please talk to your doctor before starting any high potency or mega doses of any supplement.

Thank you for your attention; stay healthy curlies!
Originally Posted by wavydaze
There was a discussion about this a while back, and several people indicated that biotin can cause severe headaches, even when taken as directed, as well as acne outbreaks.

I take these, which have 3000 mcg of biotin but also a host of vitamins and minerals. The only adverse effect I've seen is an increase in overall body hair, but nothing a shaver can't handle
Okay, now I feel silly because it sounds like I was offering something really aggressive/offensive that was in need of being shutdown in the first place. To be clear, I totally did not mean to dismiss wavydaze's opinion or her warning to exercise caution. (I definitely don't claim to be an expert. I'm just interested.) And I really like wavydaze and all of her contributions to the forum. I think she's highly educated, well researched, and a very nice person. I myself been a bit ruffled by other people's responses that I have deemed to be less than congenial or outright dismissive, and I really did not mean to come off that way. I was trying to split the difference actually, because, yes, I don't think medical doctors in general know enough about nutrition and are the best professionals to consult, but I have other concerns regarding vitamins and supplements. . . mostly regarding contamination and toxins.
Originally Posted by dusalocks
Don't feel silly - I don't think your post warranted a 'shutdown' at all.
Ondulee and dusalocks like this.
3b in South Australia.
I have many doctors in my family, and doctors don't know everything and they do make mistakes. Sometimes they insist something is true because that is what they believe they see, even when what they believe isn't what they're seeing at all. Just like regular people. And sometimes google is pretty useful, if you know how to sort out the BS.
Originally Posted by CurlyInTheFog

Of course doctors don't know everything & can make mistakes. They're highly trained health professionals.... not knowers of the universe! But it still doesn't make sense to wave off all doctors' opinions because they're they don't diddly squat about nutrition... which is the gist I've gotten from a few responses. They're still highly trained at the end of the day, and so better at gaging what may or may not be healthy. If they're good doctors they're also keeping up with current research on nutrition. I have doctors in my family too, and one of the things they constantly gripe about is proper lifestyle and nutrition. They always complain when their patients don't take their lifestyle/nutrition advice seriously. And anyway, MD's are still qualified to sift through the abundant information that is available online, some of which can be questionable. If you find some really compelling research, you could even bring it in to your next visit; have your doctor take a look at it. They'll be at least able to tell you whether it's legitimate research, or as you say "sort out the BS."

I know more about proper nutrition in pets, but the general principle is the same--nutrition is always better in whole food form. Trying to recreate real food through the use of supplements (or manufactured diets) never comes close to the real deal.
Originally Posted by CurlyInTheFog
Yes, this is what my doc says too!
fine - low/normal porosity - medium density - normal elasticity.

Currently using:
Cowash: Cure Care diluted with water 1:1
RO: Cure Care, V05 Kiwi Lime
Styler: UFD CM (old formula), FSG + CNPF
PT: IAgirl's gelatine

Experimenting with: no guar hydroxypropyltrimonium chloride, gelatin gel

Recent findings: my hair likes Cure Care diluted with water as a cowash; does NOT like guar h.c.!

iherb discount code: CFN646
There was a discussion about this a while back, and several people indicated that biotin can cause severe headaches, even when taken as directed, as well as acne outbreaks.

I take these, which have 3000 mcg of biotin but also a host of vitamins and minerals. The only adverse effect I've seen is an increase in overall body hair, but nothing a shaver can't handle
Originally Posted by yossarian
Unfortunately not everything that has adverse health effects also has perceivable symptoms.
fine - low/normal porosity - medium density - normal elasticity.

Currently using:
Cowash: Cure Care diluted with water 1:1
RO: Cure Care, V05 Kiwi Lime
Styler: UFD CM (old formula), FSG + CNPF
PT: IAgirl's gelatine

Experimenting with: no guar hydroxypropyltrimonium chloride, gelatin gel

Recent findings: my hair likes Cure Care diluted with water as a cowash; does NOT like guar h.c.!

iherb discount code: CFN646
Okay, now I feel silly because it sounds like I was offering something really aggressive/offensive that was in need of being shutdown in the first place. To be clear, I totally did not mean to dismiss wavydaze's opinion or her warning to exercise caution. (I definitely don't claim to be an expert. I'm just interested.) And I really like wavydaze and all of her contributions to the forum. I think she's highly educated, well researched, and a very nice person. I myself been a bit ruffled by other people's responses that I have deemed to be less than congenial or outright dismissive, and I really did not mean to come off that way. I was trying to split the difference actually, because, yes, I don't think medical doctors in general know enough about nutrition and are the best professionals to consult, but I have other concerns regarding vitamins and supplements. . . mostly regarding contamination and toxins.
Originally Posted by dusalocks
Don't sweat it grrrrrrrrrrrl. I wasn't actually trying to shut you down; I was counterpointing which is different, I think.

Though I do do my own research about stuffs too, I think it's dangerous to really think that I can take truly take my health into my own hands. If it were that easy, medical schools would be a dying breed. Being smart is also about knowing how much you don't know! Patient education is great but it still doesn't replace a professional opinion. I think of it like supplemental rather than a replacement.
dusalocks likes this.
fine - low/normal porosity - medium density - normal elasticity.

Currently using:
Cowash: Cure Care diluted with water 1:1
RO: Cure Care, V05 Kiwi Lime
Styler: UFD CM (old formula), FSG + CNPF
PT: IAgirl's gelatine

Experimenting with: no guar hydroxypropyltrimonium chloride, gelatin gel

Recent findings: my hair likes Cure Care diluted with water as a cowash; does NOT like guar h.c.!

iherb discount code: CFN646

Last edited by wavydaze; 08-11-2013 at 11:48 AM.
I have many doctors in my family, and doctors don't know everything and they do make mistakes. Sometimes they insist something is true because that is what they believe they see, even when what they believe isn't what they're seeing at all. Just like regular people. And sometimes google is pretty useful, if you know how to sort out the BS.
Originally Posted by CurlyInTheFog

Of course doctors don't know everything & can make mistakes. They're highly trained health professionals.... not knowers of the universe! But it still doesn't make sense to wave off all doctors' opinions because they're they don't diddly squat about nutrition... which is the gist I've gotten from a few responses. They're still highly trained at the end of the day, and so better at gaging what may or may not be healthy. If they're good doctors they're also keeping up with current research on nutrition. I have doctors in my family too, and one of the things they constantly gripe about is proper lifestyle and nutrition. They always complain when their patients don't take their lifestyle/nutrition advice seriously. And anyway, MD's are still qualified to sift through the abundant information that is available online, some of which can be questionable. If you find some really compelling research, you could even bring it in to your next visit; have your doctor take a look at it. They'll be at least able to tell you whether it's legitimate research, or as you say "sort out the BS."

I know more about proper nutrition in pets, but the general principle is the same--nutrition is always better in whole food form. Trying to recreate real food through the use of supplements (or manufactured diets) never comes close to the real deal.
Originally Posted by CurlyInTheFog
Yes, this is what my doc says too!
Originally Posted by wavydaze
Oops, I think I left a line out. I meant to say that while doctors are of course fallible, being human (and I've seen it), they still have much more training than the layman does. I see so many doctor conspiracy theories, and I don't get that at all. We've had some significant emergencies in my family, and believe me, you don't doubt the doctor then! I do think that if you need to make significant dietary changes, consulting with a nutritionist is a good idea rather than a regular doctor.

The other thing about using real food in place of supplements is that it is difficult to overdose with actual food. I'm not against the judicious use of supplements for a bona-fide deficiency, but if you just want to get more of X vitamin, eat better! Besides, most of the time if you eat better, you're getting more fiber, and most people could use more fiber in their diets as well.
curlypearl and wavydaze like this.
3a/b, F, normal porosity

Wash with either Suave Tropical Coconut, As I Am, or CJ Daily Fix
Condition with STC or Yes to Blueberries and detangle with Denman, rinse very lightly (baptismal rinse)
Add LAL gel, either Sport or Wet Look, scrunch with flour sack towel, and plop
Diffuse 5 minutes, then air dry
Okay, now I feel silly because it sounds like I was offering something really aggressive/offensive that was in need of being shutdown in the first place. To be clear, I totally did not mean to dismiss wavydaze's opinion or her warning to exercise caution. (I definitely don't claim to be an expert. I'm just interested.) And I really like wavydaze and all of her contributions to the forum. I think she's highly educated, well researched, and a very nice person. I myself been a bit ruffled by other people's responses that I have deemed to be less than congenial or outright dismissive, and I really did not mean to come off that way. I was trying to split the difference actually, because, yes, I don't think medical doctors in general know enough about nutrition and are the best professionals to consult, but I have other concerns regarding vitamins and supplements. . . mostly regarding contamination and toxins.
Originally Posted by dusalocks
Don't feel silly - I don't think your post warranted a 'shutdown' at all.
Originally Posted by Starmie
I just wanted to clarify that I also don't think wavydaze was shutting you down.

(Sorry, posted at work last night and just re-reading thought I was unclear with what I said - not that I said anything earth-shattering lol!)
dusalocks likes this.
3b in South Australia.

Last edited by Starmie; 08-12-2013 at 03:08 AM.
Oh look at us girls tripping all over ourselves to apologize merely for discussing things casually and in earnest.

Gotta stop myself sometimes, eh?
Starmie likes this.
3A - C, HP, ME, HD. (Coarse, High Porosity, Medium Elasticity, High Density.)

CG since Nov. 2012

Poos: SM Moisture Retention + Yucca Baobab, TJ's Tea Tree Tingle
Condish: TJ 'sTea Tree Tingle*, SM Moisture Retention* + Curl & Shine + Yucca Baobab, Yes to Blueberries
Stylers: KCKT*, SM Curl Enhancing Smoothie* + Curl & Style Milk*, KCCC*, FSG*, CJ Pattern Pusha, Curl Keeper
Sealers: Jojoba* or Grapeseed* oil

* = HG

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