Does wearing your hair natural mean you're a pan african?

Like Tree2Likes
  • 2 Post By sdkitty

I was having dinner with a couple ladies the other day. One has relaxed hair and the other went natural about 2 years ago. I was saying that it is a great thing to have black women go natural, embracing their hair and getting out of the matrix of systematic hair processing...

The 2 year natural replied: "I went natural only for the trend. It wasn't anything pro-black or anything... I might change back to straight eventually..."

I was thinking: What's wrong with being pro-black? You are black, it should be assumed that you are pro-black. You won't catch a Chinese person tell you they're "not pro-China or anything", or a Jewish person tell you they're "not pro-Jew or anything." Fill in the nationality or group identity, and the likelihood is you won't get that sort of response. So why is it a perfectly worldly young black lady should need to make a point to distance herself from being pro-black?

Ok, so you're black but not pro-black, and you regard wearing your natural hair that grows out your scalp as a passing trend...

What are your thoughts? Pan-Africanism (the view that black people the world over should unite to attain progress economically, culturally and otherwise) and natural hair. What are the connections you see? What impressions do you have of the situation above?

on YouTube: Moni Tano
monitano(dot)com
I think it's great when women go natural whether they're black, white, Hispanic or other
I can see what you're saying but on the other hand, for this woman to say she's not trying to make a political statement with her hair seems OK to me too.

I was having dinner with a couple ladies the other day. One has relaxed hair and the other went natural about 2 years ago. I was saying that it is a great thing to have black women go natural, embracing their hair and getting out of the matrix of systematic hair processing...

The 2 year natural replied: "I went natural only for the trend. It wasn't anything pro-black or anything... I might change back to straight eventually..."

I was thinking: What's wrong with being pro-black? You are black, it should be assumed that you are pro-black. You won't catch a Chinese person tell you they're "not pro-China or anything", or a Jewish person tell you they're "not pro-Jew or anything." Fill in the nationality or group identity, and the likelihood is you won't get that sort of response. So why is it a perfectly worldly young black lady should need to make a point to distance herself from being pro-black?

Ok, so you're black but not pro-black, and you regard wearing your natural hair that grows out your scalp as a passing trend...

What are your thoughts? Pan-Africanism (the view that black people the world over should unite to attain progress economically, culturally and otherwise) and natural hair. What are the connections you see? What impressions do you have of the situation above?

on YouTube: Moni Tano
monitano(dot)com
Originally Posted by monitano
curlypearl and noodly like this.
My point exactly, sdkitty. Since when did being in support of yourself (and your community) become a political affiliation?
Looking back in the 60s, black women wearing their hair texture meant going against society's standard of beauty which relates to the civil rights movement and black liberation. Black hair was seen as a political statement and not so much their natural texture.
I feel that the woman may see her hair as just hair,but we cant deny that majority of black american women werent taught to properly care and love their natural hair growing up. Our hair has been more than just hair and I agree on your stance. The whole pro-black concept shouldnt be seen as something bad,its just appreciation for your culture and ancestors and wanting to see positivity in your race. I guess the woman was saying she doesnt want to be put into a certain category and sees her hair as just that,hair.
It sounds like she doesn't want the stigmas of calling herself pro-black, which confuses me since it isn't a bad thing at all. Could be an issue of anti-blackness too, wanting to be black but not seen as "too black".

Trending Topics


Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On



All times are GMT -6. The time now is 11:42 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2015, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2011 NaturallyCurly.com