Silicones: HELP

I am feeling like a dolt, but I can't get this whole silicone thing straight. I've read the articles on the website, but still don't feel like I have it.

Can anyone say which silicones you can use that will be removed with a co-wash?

If not a co-wash, a gentle poo?

I co-wash and daily ... no poo wash every 3 days ... clarify shampoo when my hair falls flat. I use a gentle shampoo the odd time, but not very often... normally I just go the clarifying route.

I've been able to replace my products with ones that are more CG, and still get good results. What I am really missing though - is a texturizing cream to scrunch out the crunch. I had been using the Innersense one and loving it, but realized it too has a cone. I switched to the Finishing Polish ... it is nice, but I still miss my cream.

The pomades are okay - I've been making do with them, but I like the ones that are a creamy texture as opposed to ones that are greasier.

I'd appreciate any help !!! I'm sooooo confused

Thx
Type: 3a fine & dense,with normal porosity, terrible product junkie
ROUTINE: LI, enhancer, gel, plop with Curlease towel, serum product (either CIAB or Gel-les'c), clip & diffuse.
Too many favourite products to list ... I finally have my routine that works and alot of products to choose from. My product stash is huge, but well loved !!!
I'm also totally confused about this whole silicone thing, especially after seeing that even Devacurl has a cone in her conditioners. It seems the pros (prolonging hair color, protecting from breakage, and protecting from heat damage) outweigh the cons, but honestly I just don't know. Has anyone switched to no cones and really seen a positive difference in their hair? Or vise versa, did anyone go off cones, and see a negative impact? Thanks for the input.
Water-soluble cones (can be removed with co-wash or water-wash)

PEG-modified dimethicone
PEG-modified amodimethicone
PEG-(insert number here) dimethicone
PEG-(insert number here) amodimethicone
Dimethicone copolyol

Water-insoluble silicones (must be removed with a cleanser of some sort)

Dimethicone
Dimethiconol
Amodimethicone
Phenyl Trimethicone
Cyclomethicone
Bis-aminopropyl dimethicone

Hard-to-remove water-insoluble silicones (must be removed with several sulfate shampoo washings)

Cyclopentasiloxane
(I think the same applies to cyclotetrasiloxane, cyclohexasiloxane, etc.)

~

Dreamcurls, IMHO, since I gave up all water-insoluble silicones in my conditioners and styling products I think I've seen a big difference in my hair. The silicones can help hide damage, so when I stopped using Pantene's cyclopentasiloxane conditioners and tons of 'cone products I saw lots of split ends that I had to trim off. Now when I moisturize it with good conditioners and oils it is soft and fully healthy, not coated with silicone products that can actually suffocate the hair and make it drier. As for the frizz, I think it's a lot better now that I have been laying off the water-insoluble 'cones in conditioner and styling products (although I have been using them in shampoos sometimes).

HTH!
2a/M-C/ii hair. Super long.
I honestly have not seen a major difference in my hair whether I use cones or I don't. What I have seen a major difference in is doing regular DT's, not shampooing my hair as often and using a diffuser.
http://public.fotki.com/msgiblet/ - pw: gibber -- Pics Added 7/10/11
Fine, Thick, Normal Porosity, Normal Elasticity

Countess Balashi of Divi Beach in the Order of the Curly Crusaders

If I'm Going To Have A Bad Hair Day, It Might As Well Be In Aruba!

Again, I recommend you read this column by our Curl Chemist.

The chart on this article http://www.naturallycurly.com/curlco...es.php?id=5341 says what cleanser will remove which silicone.
Originally Posted by lazy loops
And when you're done with that one, read this one: http://www.naturallycurly.com/curlco...s.php?id=40520
what really really confuses me about cones is what is and what isn't.... not all of them end in "cone", although I have noticed quite a few also end in xane. but I have some creme gel that says it has silicone in the product description, but then I can't find it in the ingridents ???

this is what it says:
How Does It Work?
Garnier Fructis Style Brilliantine Shine with fruit micro-waxes, is a unique collection of non-greasy formulas infused with silicone and multi-dimensional shine-enhancing polymers for in-control styles that shine brilliantly.
Ingredients
Aqua Water , Glycerin , Propylene Glycol , PVP , Alcohol Denat. , Triethanolamine , PEG-40 Hydrogenated Castor Oil , Phenoxyethanol , Carbomer , Parfum Fragrance , Methylparaben , Polystyrene , Polyethylene Glycol , Linalool , Pentasodium Pentetate , Limonene , Amyl Cinnamal , PEG-192 Apricot Kernel Glycerides , PEG-70 Mango Glycerides , Citral , Citrus Limonum Lemon Extract
so which ones are the silicones?

I plan on ordering some gelibration, but until then this is what I have.....
The chart on this article http://www.naturallycurly.com/curlco...es.php?id=5341 says what cleanser will remove which silicone.
Originally Posted by lazy loops
I just wanted to say that it doesn't actually say it will REMOVE the silicone, but rather: "Studies done by Dow Corning have found that the water-insoluble silicones show no appreciable buildup when a shampoo containing one of the recommended surfactants was used."

Does that mean that there will still be silicone left on the strand, just not overload?
3b-3c CG
what really really confuses me about cones is what is and what isn't.... not all of them end in "cone", although I have noticed quite a few also end in xane. but I have some creme gel that says it has silicone in the product description, but then I can't find it in the ingridents ???

this is what it says:
How Does It Work?
Garnier Fructis Style Brilliantine Shine with fruit micro-waxes, is a unique collection of non-greasy formulas infused with silicone and multi-dimensional shine-enhancing polymers for in-control styles that shine brilliantly.
Ingredients
Aqua Water , Glycerin , Propylene Glycol , PVP , Alcohol Denat. , Triethanolamine , PEG-40 Hydrogenated Castor Oil , Phenoxyethanol , Carbomer , Parfum Fragrance , Methylparaben , Polystyrene , Polyethylene Glycol , Linalool , Pentasodium Pentetate , Limonene , Amyl Cinnamal , PEG-192 Apricot Kernel Glycerides , PEG-70 Mango Glycerides , Citral , Citrus Limonum Lemon Extract
so which ones are the silicones?

I plan on ordering some gelibration, but until then this is what I have.....
Originally Posted by tash
None of those are cones that I know of, but I would be aware of the alcohol because it could be drying out your hair, and/or causing it to produce more oil.
3b-3c CG
Again, I recommend you read this column by our Curl Chemist.

The chart on this article http://www.naturallycurly.com/curlco...es.php?id=5341 says what cleanser will remove which silicone.
Originally Posted by lazy loops
And when you're done with that one, read this one: http://www.naturallycurly.com/curlco...s.php?id=40520
Originally Posted by lazy loops
I found the first article a little clearer than the second. I understood the first article to say that:
1. cyclomethicone
2. peg-modified dimethicone and
3. dimethicone copolyol
can be removed with co-washing.
If I'm interpreting this incorrectly, PLEASE, someone let me know !!!

But the 2nd article is where I get confused. It refers to cylomethicone having molecules that are too large to penetrate, but that most curlies have found difficulty with some of the forms of this silicone - Cyclopentasiloxane - in particular. Here is a portion of the article where I get lost ...
Several curly-haired consumers on NaturallyCurly have reported very unfavorable results with products containing cyclopentasiloxane in particular. These problems were attributed to build-up on the surface or build up due to penetration of the smaller silicone into the hair shaft. However, this seems unlikely because of the chemical and physical properties of these molecules. I believe that evaporation of the cyclic silicones creates a ruffled hair cuticle that creates a rough, unpleasant texture on the hair surface in the same manner as evaporation of ethyl alcohol or isopropyl alcohol. The mildly acidic pH of a shampoo and conditioner will help restore the sealed, flat surface of the cuticle, thereby improving the texture and gloss of the hair

I know that, in the end, we have to experiment with our hair ... but it would be really helpful if someone could just say ... These are the silicones that are very bad for your hair - ones that you will have to use a harsh shampoo to get out....And .. These are silicones that you can likely use if you co-wash.

I freely admit that I am not a chemist (likely obvious to all now ) ... but I am finding this really difficult to work with.

I try and avoid the silicones when I can ... however ... I'm looking for 'cone' ... I haven't even tried to venture into the other forms of cones that don't end in 'cone'
I am hoping that if the majority of my products don't have cones and I only use ones that appear to be removable by co-washing, that my hair will be okay ??

Am I out to lunch with this, or does this theory of mine hold any possibilities ??

Sorry for the long winded babble ... maybe I'm looking for the impossible.
Type: 3a fine & dense,with normal porosity, terrible product junkie
ROUTINE: LI, enhancer, gel, plop with Curlease towel, serum product (either CIAB or Gel-les'c), clip & diffuse.
Too many favourite products to list ... I finally have my routine that works and alot of products to choose from. My product stash is huge, but well loved !!!
Here is a portion of the article where I get lost ...
Several curly-haired consumers on NaturallyCurly have reported very unfavorable results with products containing cyclopentasiloxane in particular. These problems were attributed to build-up on the surface or build up due to penetration of the smaller silicone into the hair shaft. However, this seems unlikely because of the chemical and physical properties of these molecules. I believe that evaporation of the cyclic silicones creates a ruffled hair cuticle that creates a rough, unpleasant texture on the hair surface in the same manner as evaporation of ethyl alcohol or isopropyl alcohol. The mildly acidic pH of a shampoo and conditioner will help restore the sealed, flat surface of the cuticle, thereby improving the texture and gloss of the hair
Originally Posted by FrizzBgone
Maybe this will help a bit.

Your hair is made up of two major parts: the cuticle and the cortex (some people actually have a third part, the medulla, but since many people don't, we'll pretend it doesn't exist for this discussion).

The cortex is the innermost part of your hair shaft. That's where ALL chemical action takes place. If you color, perm or relax your hair, this is where the chemical changes occur that keep those changes "permanent."

The cuticle is the outermost part of your hair shaft - the covering. It looks like tiny roof tiles that are shingled one on top of each other. When they lay flat, your hair looks smooth, shiny, silky and frizz-free. When they are "ruffled" (as mentioned above), your hair will look rough, frizzy and dull.

Whether or not something is permanent depends on how large the molecules of the process are and whether they can penetrate through the cuticle into the cortex. Permanent color is permanent because the molecules in permanent hair color are very tiny. Semi- and demi-permanent colors only last for a certain period of time because the color molecules are too large to penetrate into the cortex ... so they only affect a physical change by staining the cuticle with color rather than affect a chemical change in the cortex. Silicones are not permanent because, while their molecules are sometimes small enough to penetrate into the cortex, they don't chemically change our hair.

So ... the single most important thing we can do for our hair is to keep the cuticle shut. When the cuticle is open, color leaches out faster and lots of damaging things can get in and mess with the cortex. That's why we don't use silicones or try to use acid-balanced shampoos and conditioners whenever we can, or do ACV or lemon juice rinses. Silicones penetrate into our inner hair shaft (the cortex) and dry out our already-dry hair. Acids close the cuticle, so we look for acid-balanced products or do ACV/lemon juice rinses. Curly hair health and beauty depends on keeping the cuticle shut as much as possible.

Does this help or did I confuse you further?
- Tiffany
Hair Stylist and Curly Hair Specialist - St. Petersburg, FL (Tampa Bay)

Blog: Live Curly, Live Free
Facebook fan page: Live Curly Live Free

Sulfate- and non-water soluble silicone-free since 04/22/2002
3B, brunette: medium texture, low porosity, high density

Your hair is made up of two major parts: the cuticle and the cortex (some people actually have a third part, the medulla, but since many people don't, we'll pretend it doesn't exist for this discussion).

The cortex is the innermost part of your hair shaft. That's where ALL chemical action takes place. If you color, perm or relax your hair, this is where the chemical changes occur that keep those changes "permanent."

The cuticle is the outermost part of your hair shaft - the covering. It looks like tiny roof tiles that are shingled one on top of each other. When they lay flat, your hair looks smooth, shiny, silky and frizz-free. When they are "ruffled" (as mentioned above), your hair will look rough, frizzy and dull.

Whether or not something is permanent depends on how large the molecules of the process are and whether they can penetrate through the cuticle into the cortex. Permanent color is permanent because the molecules in permanent hair color are very tiny. Semi- and demi-permanent colors only last for a certain period of time because the color molecules are too large to penetrate into the cortex ... so they only affect a physical change by staining the cuticle with color rather than affect a chemical change in the cortex. Silicones are not permanent because, while their molecules are sometimes small enough to penetrate into the cortex, they don't chemically change our hair.

So ... the single most important thing we can do for our hair is to keep the cuticle shut. When the cuticle is open, color leaches out faster and lots of damaging things can get in and mess with the cortex. That's why we don't use silicones or try to use acid-balanced shampoos and conditioners whenever we can, or do ACV or lemon juice rinses. Silicones penetrate into our inner hair shaft (the cortex) and dry out our already-dry hair. Acids close the cuticle, so we look for acid-balanced products or do ACV/lemon juice rinses. Curly hair health and beauty depends on keeping the cuticle shut as much as possible.

Does this help or did I confuse you further?
Originally Posted by StruttsWife
THANK YOU You have helped A LOT

Can I ask you another question though. Are the silicones that can be removed with a co-wash as damaging? The only product (Innersense Texturizing Cream) that I use occasionally has cyclomethicone in it.

I don't use it more than twice a week and I co-wash almost every day ... cleansing with a sulfate free shampoo weekly, followed by a DT. When my hair starts to fall flat I use the eluscence clarifying shampoo, followed by a D.T.

Here are the ingredients of it of the Texturizing whipped cream:

Key Ingredients: Purified water, cyclomethicone, behentrimonium methosulfate, cetyl esters, avena sativa (oat) kernel extract, olea europaea (olive) fruit oil, citrus aurantium dulcis (orange) flower oil, panthenol, hydrolyzed wheat protein, beeswax/cera alba/cire d’abeille, simmondsia chinensis (jojoba) seed oil, butyrospermum parkii (shea butter) fruit extract, agropyron (wheatgrass) extract, helianthus annuus (sunflower) seed oil, vaccinum macrocarpon (cranberry) seed oil, Pvp, aspalathus linearis extract, cymbopogon schoenanthus extract, glycerin, nelumbium speciosum (lotus) flower extract, plumeria alba flower extract, nelumbium speciosum (lotus) flower oil, PEG-75, parfum of natural oils

I'd love to hear your opinion on the product.

Thank you so much for your help. You've explained it really well.
Type: 3a fine & dense,with normal porosity, terrible product junkie
ROUTINE: LI, enhancer, gel, plop with Curlease towel, serum product (either CIAB or Gel-les'c), clip & diffuse.
Too many favourite products to list ... I finally have my routine that works and alot of products to choose from. My product stash is huge, but well loved !!!
ok... I admit I looked up medulla I found this site: http://www.texascollaborative.org/hi...les/topic2.htm which basicly says what pp said but with picutres

anyway I thought it was kinda cool so I thought I would share

Can I ask you another question though. Are the silicones that can be removed with a co-wash as damaging? The only product (Innersense Texturizing Cream) that I use occasionally has cyclomethicone in it.

I'd love to hear your opinion on the product.

Thank you so much for your help. You've explained it really well.
Originally Posted by FrizzBgone
Here's the thing - most silicones aren't "damaging" to the hair. If you can remove it, then you should be fine. The cyclo- ones have given some folks a really hard time though, so that is one of those things that is "buyer beware." I personally don't have problems with a small amount of the cyclosiloxanes (cyclomethicone), but some people do. They canbe drying, but not everyone experiences that effect.

That is why sometimes my articles come across as noncomittal, because frankly, everyone has a different situation affecting the outcome of the use of any particular product. Among the relevant factors are your weather, your water, your hair texture, degree of curliness, personal preference with regard to texture and curl, how many different products you use and how might they interact, is your hair colored/chemically treated, ....etc... There is almost never one definitive answer for everyone's questions about whether an ingredient is "okay" to use.

Also, my articles have kind of over time touched on a lot of the things mentioned in this thread, as well as other factors, but I simply cannot reiterate the same points every month, so it is sometimes helpful to go back and start at the beginning (in 2004). There are lots of other primers on hair/personal care stuff available as well, so sometimes it just helps to go read what is out there.

Anyway, it is my opinion that the Curly Girl book had some great info in it, but that some of it left folks unduly frightened of every little ingredient. I think Ms. Massey was really particualrly addressing the trend at the time the book was published to include heavy amounts of water insoluble silicones in hair products targeting curly hair, which we all know can have very bad effects on our hair. Moderation and knowing your own hair and its needs is truly the key.
THANK YOU You have helped A LOT

Can I ask you another question though. Are the silicones that can be removed with a co-wash as damaging? The only product (Innersense Texturizing Cream) that I use occasionally has cyclomethicone in it.

I don't use it more than twice a week and I co-wash almost every day ... cleansing with a sulfate free shampoo weekly, followed by a DT. When my hair starts to fall flat I use the eluscence clarifying shampoo, followed by a D.T.

Here are the ingredients of it of the Texturizing whipped cream:

Key Ingredients: Purified water, cyclomethicone, behentrimonium methosulfate, cetyl esters, avena sativa (oat) kernel extract, olea europaea (olive) fruit oil, citrus aurantium dulcis (orange) flower oil, panthenol, hydrolyzed wheat protein, beeswax/cera alba/cire d’abeille, simmondsia chinensis (jojoba) seed oil, butyrospermum parkii (shea butter) fruit extract, agropyron (wheatgrass) extract, helianthus annuus (sunflower) seed oil, vaccinum macrocarpon (cranberry) seed oil, Pvp, aspalathus linearis extract, cymbopogon schoenanthus extract, glycerin, nelumbium speciosum (lotus) flower extract, plumeria alba flower extract, nelumbium speciosum (lotus) flower oil, PEG-75, parfum of natural oils

I'd love to hear your opinion on the product.

Thank you so much for your help. You've explained it really well.
Originally Posted by FrizzBgone
I'm so glad ... I was afraid I might have confused the bejaysus out of you, LOL.

In my opinion (and this is only MY opinion, mind you) ... a true silicone is not nor will it ever be water soluble. True silicones are what we call polymers and have the following properties:

- the ability to repel water
- the ability to form watertight seals
- resistance to air and sun

If we think about how other silicones - caulk, adhesives, sealants, etc. - perform, it's easier to picture what true silicones in our hair products do as well. True silicones bond to our hair surface with a tight grip and don't release because they are impervious to water ... just like the caulk around our bathtub. True silicones keep the sunlight and hair from penetrating into our hair shaft ... just like a silicone-based sealant around a window frame does. So to call a silicone "water soluble" is, in essence, a complete contradiction if we understand the properties of true silicones. A true silicone will always leave a build-up on your hair until it is removed with a detergent-based surfactant formulated for that purpose.

"Water soluble silicones" do exist, but they are a different animal with a different chemical structure. Yes, you can remove them with a conditioner-only wash, but they are not going to perform like a true silicone. Right now, they are the best thing we curlies have going for us ... we get some of the benefits of true silicones without the bad side effects. But they aren't perfect and they are never going to be our holy grail.

Looking at the molecular structure of cyclomethicone: it appears the molecules are too big to penetrate into the hair shaft ... it also seems to be more volatile than other silicones, such as dimethicone, and evaporates quickly. I'm not a product chemist, but I suspect its main function is more of a delivery mechanism, which helps the other nutrients in your product (such as the herbal oils and extracts) to enter your hair shaft, then it disappears. That's why a co-wash is probably more than sufficient to cleanse your hair, since the cyclomethicone has already evaporated. It is not, however, a true silicone and you are not getting the benefits you would from one.

Just my $.02 (well, that was more like $1.50, but there you have it )
- Tiffany
Hair Stylist and Curly Hair Specialist - St. Petersburg, FL (Tampa Bay)

Blog: Live Curly, Live Free
Facebook fan page: Live Curly Live Free

Sulfate- and non-water soluble silicone-free since 04/22/2002
3B, brunette: medium texture, low porosity, high density

In my opinion (and this is only MY opinion, mind you) ... a true silicone is not nor will it ever be water soluble. True silicones are what we call polymers and have the following properties:

- the ability to repel water
- the ability to form watertight seals
- resistance to air and sun

If we think about how other silicones - caulk, adhesives, sealants, etc. - perform, it's easier to picture what true silicones in our hair products do as well. True silicones bond to our hair surface with a tight grip and don't release because they are impervious to water ... just like the caulk around our bathtub. True silicones keep the sunlight and hair from penetrating into our hair shaft ... just like a silicone-based sealant around a window frame does. So to call a silicone "water soluble" is, in essence, a complete contradiction if we understand the properties of true silicones. A true silicone will always leave a build-up on your hair until it is removed with a detergent-based surfactant formulated for that purpose.

"Water soluble silicones" do exist, but they are a different animal with a different chemical structure. Yes, you can remove them with a conditioner-only wash, but they are not going to perform like a true silicone. Right now, they are the best thing we curlies have going for us ... we get some of the benefits of true silicones without the bad side effects. But they aren't perfect and they are never going to be our holy grail.

Looking at the molecular structure of cyclomethicone: it appears the molecules are too big to penetrate into the hair shaft ... it also seems to be more volatile than other silicones, such as dimethicone, and evaporates quickly. I'm not a product chemist, but I suspect its main function is more of a delivery mechanism, which helps the other nutrients in your product (such as the herbal oils and extracts) to enter your hair shaft, then it disappears. That's why a co-wash is probably more than sufficient to cleanse your hair, since the cyclomethicone has already evaporated. It is not, however, a true silicone and you are not getting the benefits you would from one.

Just my $.02 (well, that was more like $1.50, but there you have it )
Originally Posted by StruttsWife
Well, not entirely true. Silicones are actually desirable in some applications because they allow air to penetrate. They are specifically used in contacts lenses and hair care products, to name a couple of applications, due to their oxygen permeability. The silicones of which you speak are quite different types of polymers, in that they are cross-linked solids. They share some properties in common, but really are quite different overall.

Water soluble silicones are silicones. I am not at all certain why one would say they are not, but they are. Modified silicones such as silicone copolyol and PEG-copolymers actaully have the benefits of a silicone (enhanced gloss, smotthing effect), plus the benefit of a water-soluble tail which makes them much less apt to build up. Also, amine-functionalized silicones (amodimethicone, etc.) are still silicones, simply modified with amine groups along the backbone. They are not water soluble, yet they give superior benefits with regard to thermal protection, gloss/shine, smoothness/detangling, color protection, and yet they also resist build up. However, they do require a surfactant-containing shampoo for removal. (Cocamidopropyl betaine will remove all of the silicones 99%+, so it is not necessary to use SLS or SLES).

Cyclomethicone is useful as a delivery agent, but is also used because it helps hair dry faster after washing due to its volatility. It also provides what is known in the business as "transient conditioning." It smoothes and detangles the hair nicely, but doesn't stick around.
I have a question about dimethicone. It's in one of my shampoos, and the shampoo also has several sulfates in it. When I use it, is the dimethicone actually being deposited on the strands for me to clarify out later or is it just lessening the harshness of the sulfates?

TIA!
2a/M-C/ii hair. Super long.
Well, not entirely true. Silicones are actually desirable in some applications because they allow air to penetrate. They are specifically used in contacts lenses and hair care products, to name a couple of applications, due to their oxygen permeability. The silicones of which you speak are quite different types of polymers, in that they are cross-linked solids. They share some properties in common, but really are quite different overall.

Water soluble silicones are silicones. I am not at all certain why one would say they are not, but they are. Modified silicones such as silicone copolyol and PEG-copolymers actaully have the benefits of a silicone (enhanced gloss, smotthing effect), plus the benefit of a water-soluble tail which makes them much less apt to build up. Also, amine-functionalized silicones (amodimethicone, etc.) are still silicones, simply modified with amine groups along the backbone. They are not water soluble, yet they give superior benefits with regard to thermal protection, gloss/shine, smoothness/detangling, color protection, and yet they also resist build up. However, they do require a surfactant-containing shampoo for removal. (Cocamidopropyl betaine will remove all of the silicones 99%+, so it is not necessary to use SLS or SLES).

Cyclomethicone is useful as a delivery agent, but is also used because it helps hair dry faster after washing due to its volatility. It also provides what is known in the business as "transient conditioning." It smoothes and detangles the hair nicely, but doesn't stick around.
Originally Posted by Swirlycurly Chemist
One wouldn't say water soluble silicones weren't silicones, because one didn't. If you re-read what I wrote, I said water soluble silicones were different, but I wasn't aware at any point that I said they weren't silicones.

And yes, the amine-functionalized silicones are silicones, with better benefits than the original silicones of old. But they still coat the hair shaft and can promote dehydration in both straight and curly hair.
- Tiffany
Hair Stylist and Curly Hair Specialist - St. Petersburg, FL (Tampa Bay)

Blog: Live Curly, Live Free
Facebook fan page: Live Curly Live Free

Sulfate- and non-water soluble silicone-free since 04/22/2002
3B, brunette: medium texture, low porosity, high density

Mint, I would think there would still be some small amount of dimethicone being deposited onto your hair that would need further removal later.
- Tiffany
Hair Stylist and Curly Hair Specialist - St. Petersburg, FL (Tampa Bay)

Blog: Live Curly, Live Free
Facebook fan page: Live Curly Live Free

Sulfate- and non-water soluble silicone-free since 04/22/2002
3B, brunette: medium texture, low porosity, high density

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