I don't think it's fair to tip 15% to stylist...

People always say that waitresses live of their tips- really? I would imagine they live of their wage.
Originally Posted by kat180
In most states within the US, restaurant owners are allowed to pay their servers a fraction of the legal minimum wage, and servers are expected to supplement that wage with tips to build it up to a living wage. For example, one of my friends applied to a restaurant a few years ago. She was offered $2.50 an hour. That's $20 for a full eight hours of work - about 12 pounds sterling, if my exchange rate is correct.

Assuming a server at this restaurant works full time, five days a week for a month, her employer has paid her $120 - about 72 pounds sterling. That wouldn't even begin to cover rent, much less food and other expenses. It's a tough situation for servers, but it's completely legal. Fortunately, some states have raised the legal pay for servers, allowing them to make minimum wage or even a little better, so they aren't quite so desperate for tips.
Originally Posted by Gills
Oh I see- that is truly awful- I don't understand the point of having a legal minimum wage if you can then pay less. Surely thats just illegal?
*edit, gils also responded while I was typing away
No, its not illegal. Lovely wage practices here in the states

Expected tipping practices are different in Europe than in America.

In Germany, for example, it was customary to tip less around 10% or rounding up to the nearest euro or two. Like with you, it was nine pounds, so you gave her an even 10 right? In Germany, the waitresses had to be trained (no lie) AND they received far more than poverty wage.

In Oklahoma, when I worked as a waitress, I made a special minimum wage that was only for people who are expected to gain most of their income from tips. In different states its also different. In OK I made 2.18 an hour. That was 20 years ago, though I think I looked it up online a while back and it had only made it up to 5.15 now that our overall minimum had gone up. However, in Las Vegas, I was told the waiters/waitresses made $10 bucks an hour. So its different depending on the economy of the state, though it is expected everywhere you go in the states to tip 15% of your total bill (for a dinner out).

Yes, bellboys here still expect a tip. They expect a tip, because you can tell them not to carry up your luggage, and you don't have to pay them. You can do it yourself. *shrugs*

To the OP, if you don't like your services enough to want to tip, then perhaps you can find a different stylist? I know that when my stylist is done with my $120 cut and color, I *want* to give her the extra money, because she has treated me so well, or gone the extra distance for me. I realize that might sound a little rude, but it isn't meant to be.


^ people expect a tip for that? Never heard of that before.

I tip my hairdresser- it costs me 9 so I give her a 1 tip. No biggie.

Sometimes I tip at restaurants sometimes I don't- and its never something like a percentage- just whatever loose change I have- usually a couple of quid. People always say that waitresses live of their tips- really? I would imagine they live of their wage. I worked in a little cafe (no the same thing I know)- the manager got any tips- didn't bother me I didn't expect any either. I worked for my wages and thats the amount I expected to take home at the end of the day.

Not that I've ever been in this position- but are there still those people who like carry your bags up to your rooms in hotel and then expect a tip? Id never tip someone for that.
Originally Posted by kat180
Grand Goobah Caedran, Aqueous Infusion of Demulcents, Order of the Curly Crusaders

Fia 2cFi, fine texture, med porosity CG 5-29-09 * My hair loves protein! Currently using : DermOrganics Shampoo and IHM, G2B Kinkier Mousse, Re:Coil VMM, Anything Spiral Solutions! MO Sealing. Coconut Oil Pre-Poo, once a month Hard Water shampoo. Avoiding Glycerin in finishing products.


Last edited by goobernut; 09-13-2009 at 11:15 AM.
Speckla
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I never tip my haircutter either - I figure washing his dirty drawers, cooking his meals, giving birth to his child is enough of a tip...lol. I stopped going to salons and just have my husband trim it occasionally.
Wow, this is an interesting subject.

I only get my hair cut every 6 months, and colored maybe once a year.

Okay, this is my experience---most stylists do a horrible job. I've gone to $10 cut places, Penney's salons, Aveda salons where you pay $50 for a cut, and the result is the same. Chunks hanging out, one side longer than the other, bizarre layering, etc.

I've stopped having them shampoo me because they usually ruthlessly comb my hair out and it hurts! I go in with it already wet and combed into a bun.

And rarely do they do any styling or drying when they are done, the most I get is--Do you want me to put some product in? Actually that's fine with me because the few times I've let a stylist do my hair I've ended up with a horrible frizzy tangled mess that I must reshampoo over when I go home, anyway.

Example: I got my hair trimmed last week, it took her less than 10 minutes to do it, no offer to dry it was made, I was charged $40, I tipped $4.00. I always tip, but usually 10%.

My hair is long, thick, and obv. curly and I LOATHE getting my hair trimmed because no one does a good job. I feel like every stylist is hurrying to get me out of her chair. I don't know. I've never had a good experience with one. I watch straighties get their hair blown out, styled, and meticulously trimmed, but I get crap. So I tip 10%.
Wavy, curly on the ends, 2C.
Coarse to medium textured, porous, dry, and lots of it.
Shampoo--HSH Pumpkin, Abba Pure Moisture
LVPNG, HSH Pumpkin, Walgreen's Knockoffs--Condish/Cowash
AOHR, Nexxus, EO--LI
CK & ReCoil--Activator
Suave Max Hold, Alagio Curl-Gel
For inquiring minds who want to know:
http://www.public.fotki.com/TillyErnissee
TillyMunchyWaves: Oh gosh, I'm so sorry you've had such awful experiences. And yes, in cases where you feel like crap afterward and get poor service, I'd say you're well within your rights to give a small tip.

On a side note, have you checked out the CurlSalons recommendations on this website?

http://www.naturallycurly.com/curlsalons

They give reviews of stylists by area or by city, and by no means are they all pricey.
Hair type: 3a, medium porosity (??), medium texture
Final sulfate wash: April 14, 2009
Co-wash: Suave Pomegranate
Conditioner: GVPCB, AOHR, Garnier Triple Nutrition
Products: Experimenting with KCKT and KCCC

My hair loves:
Olive oil
LVPNG
...still trying to figure out what else!

My hair hates:
ACV
Biotera Curl Creme (?)
A-cone
If my stylist is so well off in this great economy that she doesn't need me spending $105-172 for highlights or $45 for a haircut because I tipped 10% instead of 15-20%, then she is a fool. I have never asked her to reduce her prices.

I just went to a dentist to have my teeth cleaned. The hygenist performed the service, it 30 minutes and I was charged $80 dollars. She will only receive a part of that and the dentist's office will keep the rest. Why don't we tip them too!

And if we're talking about education, the hygentist has an higher education. And again, what about the doctors who spent 8-12 years in school. (imagine what that cost!) We should be tipping them 50%!
If my stylist is so well off in this great economy that she doesn't need me spending $105-172 for highlights or $45 for a haircut because I tipped 10% instead of 15-20%, then she is a fool. I have never asked her to reduce her prices.

I just went to a dentist to have my teeth cleaned. The hygenist performed the service, it 30 minutes and I was charged $80 dollars. She will only receive a part of that and the dentist's office will keep the rest. Why don't we tip them too!

And if we're talking about education, the hygentist has an higher education. And again, what about the doctors who spent 8-12 years in school. (imagine what that cost!) We should be tipping them 50%!
Originally Posted by cubancurls
On this point, someone mentioned earlier that it's because these people gain/charge much more for their services.

Based on that, and the fact that stylists gain much less and whatever other reasons, there are thousands of other jobs that deserve tips but don't get them: the guy that picks up your trash, why haven't you tipped him? Artisans, do any of you tip them?
If my stylist is so well off in this great economy that she doesn't need me spending $105-172 for highlights or $45 for a haircut because I tipped 10% instead of 15-20%, then she is a fool. I have never asked her to reduce her prices.
Originally Posted by cubancurls
In a previous reply on this thread, a stylist told us that she'd never turn someone away for giving a bad tip. Obviously she's not speaking for all stylists, but she's more of an expert on the subject than any of us non-stylists, in my opinion.

I just went to a dentist to have my teeth cleaned. The hygenist performed the service, it 30 minutes and I was charged $80 dollars. She will only receive a part of that and the dentist's office will keep the rest. Why don't we tip them too!
Originally Posted by cubancurls
Because, as far as I know, the dental hygienist is receiving a larger wage for her work than a stylist, and is not having to buy all of her own supplies and take regular classes on how to do her job.

And if we're talking about education, the hygentist has an higher education. And again, what about the doctors who spent 8-12 years in school. (imagine what that cost!) We should be tipping them 50%!
Originally Posted by cubancurls
Again, doctors are receiving a much larger wage than stylists. It's not about the type or quality of work being done, nor is it about the education behind the work. It's how the pay structure is set up. The system is set up so that doctors (and most people in most other professions) are not expected to rely on tips, so their prices reflect what they need to make a living wage (I'm oversimplifying, because the insurance system complicates this process). Stylists, waitresses, and some other service professions are working within a system that forces them to rely on tips to supplement an income that is lower than a living wage.

If people don't like the system, I believe their anger is much better directed toward changing the system than screwing over their stylists. But, as always, that's my opinion =)
Hair type: 3a, medium porosity (??), medium texture
Final sulfate wash: April 14, 2009
Co-wash: Suave Pomegranate
Conditioner: GVPCB, AOHR, Garnier Triple Nutrition
Products: Experimenting with KCKT and KCCC

My hair loves:
Olive oil
LVPNG
...still trying to figure out what else!

My hair hates:
ACV
Biotera Curl Creme (?)
A-cone
If my stylist is so well off in this great economy that she doesn't need me spending $105-172 for highlights or $45 for a haircut because I tipped 10% instead of 15-20%, then she is a fool. I have never asked her to reduce her prices.

I just went to a dentist to have my teeth cleaned. The hygenist performed the service, it 30 minutes and I was charged $80 dollars. She will only receive a part of that and the dentist's office will keep the rest. Why don't we tip them too!

And if we're talking about education, the hygentist has an higher education. And again, what about the doctors who spent 8-12 years in school. (imagine what that cost!) We should be tipping them 50%!
Originally Posted by cubancurls
Your hygenist is paid a salary, that is why you don't tip her.
Cynthia
I don't think it's fair to tip my stylist 15% either, which is why I tip 20%. :P

I tip for all the reasons already listed. Just because you pay $50 for a cut does not mean the stylist is actually getting $50 or even $25 for that cut.

It's well known, at least in the US, that you tip stylists, and you figure that cost into your visit.
Kiva! Microfinance works.

Med/Coarse, porous curly.
Ok, here goes, I have a lot to say on this subject. I have been a stylist for over 22 years. I have never received health benefits, paid vacation, sick days, lunch break, bathroom break etc like most people with salaried jobs. Does the Hygenist provide her own equipment, like x ray machine? no, I do. I have six pairs of shears all over 350.00 a piece, a blowdryer that was 200.00 brushes 35.00 a piece my combs cost 7.00 a piece. Clips, curling iron, you know all the crap there is in a salon, I don't have to list everything. I also spend thousands of dollars on education (plane fare, hotel, the class, the rental car, food, at least 1200.00 for two days). Your stylist gets no more that 50% of the ticket, before tax, she may have to tip out or pay the assistants by the hour or per client, tubes of color product charges, receptionist fees, etc.. Let's talk about the client that doesn't show up and takes three hour out of my day when I can't get someone from the waiting list to fill the time. Lets talk about how bad the economy is and sitting around for 4 hours praying somebody walks in so you have something to do till your 7:45 pm client shows up, and then they don't. Advertising on Naturally curly costs about 275.00 a quarter. So here is the final word on tipping, 20-25% on regular services, tip out the shampoo help 2$ for shampoo, 5$ for color application, regardless how much the ticket is. If they did a great job it should be more. For the holidays, prepare yourself, this is from the New York times, and Vogue magazine, you should gift your stylist the total cost of your most expensive service that you receive during the year. So if your color and cut is 100.00 your gift is the same. So when you get called to appear on The young and the restless, or you get those Oprah tickets and you have roots and frizz and you have treated your stylist like a valued professional, the answer will be yes on a Sunday at 5am so you can catch the flight omg I am so excited about the tickets do you think you can do my hair. I drove to Vermont for a clients wedding from New Jersey when the local stylist they hired got sick, I got there at three in the morning and did ten girls up do's and makeup. She paid me 2,000.00 and got me seats for the New York ballet opening night, any time she wasn't using her beach house she called me and asked if I would like to take my son for the weekend as her guest. She was an incredible example but there it is. Food for thought. I love my clients and I treat them just like I would treat my mom or sister or best friend, and they treat me the same way back.
Cynthia
I love what I do, but it's not a hobby.
As I said earlier, I always tip - usually 20%. At my salon, I just put the tip in an envelope with the stylist's name, the date and my name. The stylists share their tips with the shampoo girls so I don't have to tip them separately. Very convenient.
2Poodles Southeast PA
fine, med porosity, normal elasticity
Currently using the following 2 - 3 x/week:
Living Proof Perfect Hair Day suphate-free Poo, cone-free CO and styling treatment, plus KCCC

Ok, here goes, I have a lot to say on this subject. I have been a stylist for over 22 years. I have never received health benefits, paid vacation, sick days, lunch break, bathroom break etc like most people with salaried jobs. Does the Hygenist provide her own equipment, like x ray machine? no, I do. I have six pairs of shears all over 350.00 a piece, a blowdryer that was 200.00 brushes 35.00 a piece my combs cost 7.00 a piece. Clips, curling iron, you know all the crap there is in a salon, I don't have to list everything. I also spend thousands of dollars on education (plane fare, hotel, the class, the rental car, food, at least 1200.00 for two days). Your stylist gets no more that 50% of the ticket, before tax, she may have to tip out or pay the assistants by the hour or per client, tubes of color product charges, receptionist fees, etc.. Let's talk about the client that doesn't show up and takes three hour out of my day when I can't get someone from the waiting list to fill the time. Lets talk about how bad the economy is and sitting around for 4 hours praying somebody walks in so you have something to do till your 7:45 pm client shows up, and then they don't. Advertising on Naturally curly costs about 275.00 a quarter. So here is the final word on tipping, 20-25% on regular services, tip out the shampoo help 2$ for shampoo, 5$ for color application, regardless how much the ticket is. If they did a great job it should be more. For the holidays, prepare yourself, this is from the New York times, and Vogue magazine, you should gift your stylist the total cost of your most expensive service that you receive during the year. So if your color and cut is 100.00 your gift is the same. So when you get called to appear on The young and the restless, or you get those Oprah tickets and you have roots and frizz and you have treated your stylist like a valued professional, the answer will be yes on a Sunday at 5am so you can catch the flight omg I am so excited about the tickets do you think you can do my hair. I drove to Vermont for a clients wedding from New Jersey when the local stylist they hired got sick, I got there at three in the morning and did ten girls up do's and makeup. She paid me 2,000.00 and got me seats for the New York ballet opening night, any time she wasn't using her beach house she called me and asked if I would like to take my son for the weekend as her guest. She was an incredible example but there it is. Food for thought. I love my clients and I treat them just like I would treat my mom or sister or best friend, and they treat me the same way back.
Cynthia
I love what I do, but it's not a hobby.
Originally Posted by curlpro
Well, as a Client, I would have to say I am in full agreement.

And yes, with all service people, Holiday gifts/bonuses should be equivalent to one service or one weeks salary (housekeeper, Nanny/dog walker, etc).
Curls,Coils,Waves & WhatKnot
3miii/My HGs tame bulk&frizz/Give definition w/o crunch
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Just to clear some things up, not ALL hairstylist rent their chairs. Some business work that way, but some businesses work like any other, where they hire a hairdresser, agree upon what said stylist charges, and pays them an hourly rate. During the employment time the hairstylist may work under another, learn techniques such as coloring - some stylist have never worked with color, or work with a different color brand, and are trained in the salon to work with the products the salon uses. Some salons will pay for their stylists to go to classes, seminars, hair shows and such. The stylist is not always responsible for the payment of these things.

I understand there are situations where costs do fall on the individual, but that isn't an across the board practice.


As for waitresses. When I was a waitress for the several years that I worked in restaurants, I was paid $2.63 an hour. If I wanted health insurance, I was going to have to pay for all of it. It wasn't covered by my employer. Being a waitress is incredibly hard work. Not only are you bringing people their food, but you are cleaning up after them as well. Some people are really cruel, and rude in the restaurant business. If I had a good day in tips, I earned every minute of it. Nothing about it is glamorous.

Waitresses are not able to wear their own fancy clothes, or jewelry, they aren't allowed to rock cool hairstyles, and usually go home sticky, dirty, and smelling like salad dressing. This person brings you your food, and cleans up what you left behind. That is most certainly a servant. I am damn well tipping that person at least 20%.

And the history of tipping is that it was set up to insure proper service, which is where t.i.p.s. came from. Originally people were tipped out before they preformed said service. This gave them an idea at what level they were to perform. Based on what they were tipped out at the beginning.

Last edited by iroc; 09-13-2009 at 06:36 PM.
I think tipping is customary, but the OP brings up a good point as to WHY it's done. My take is that you should pay what you feel the service was worth. I can say I've had many haircutters (note: NOT stylists) that have done a $15 job when they charge $25. I have paid the $25. My current stylist charges $50 and does a $100 job. My finances do not allow me to pay her the $100 I would want to, but I do tip 20% - with many, many "thank yous" and as many referrals as I possibly can. Treat it like any other service industry, IMO - if someone does a bang-up job for you, then reward them. But just as I wouldn't tip a server who is awful (I've done this 2x - I have tipped the other servers who helped and the barstaff instead!), I would not tip a stylist who doesn't listen to me and does a poor job because s/he is preoccupied with chatting or other things other than the client.

Stacy
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I think tipping is customary, but the OP brings up a good point as to WHY it's done. My take is that you should pay what you feel the service was worth. I can say I've had many haircutters (note: NOT stylists) that have done a $15 job when they charge $25. I have paid the $25. My current stylist charges $50 and does a $100 job. My finances do not allow me to pay her the $100 I would want to, but I do tip 20% - with many, many "thank yous" and as many referrals as I possibly can. Treat it like any other service industry, IMO - if someone does a bang-up job for you, then reward them. But just as I wouldn't tip a server who is awful (I've done this 2x - I have tipped the other servers who helped and the barstaff instead!), I would not tip a stylist who doesn't listen to me and does a poor job because s/he is preoccupied with chatting or other things other than the client.

Stacy
Originally Posted by wookiemouse
I am assuming we are talking about services we are reasonably pleased with and plan to revisit for.
Curls,Coils,Waves & WhatKnot
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half the time, stylists don't wanna reduce a price, but the salon made everyone drop their prices so they could get more people in. depends on what kind of salon they work at.

And as someone else pointed out, the hygienist probably didn't have to buy all the equipment she had to use either. And most decent dentists will help her pay for all her continuing education credits, and I'm guessing not many salons help pay for education for the stylists.

And because I had to google it.... Read Dear Abby



If my stylist is so well off in this great economy that she doesn't need me spending $105-172 for highlights or $45 for a haircut because I tipped 10% instead of 15-20%, then she is a fool. I have never asked her to reduce her prices.

I just went to a dentist to have my teeth cleaned. The hygenist performed the service, it 30 minutes and I was charged $80 dollars. She will only receive a part of that and the dentist's office will keep the rest. Why don't we tip them too!

And if we're talking about education, the hygentist has an higher education. And again, what about the doctors who spent 8-12 years in school. (imagine what that cost!) We should be tipping them 50%!
Originally Posted by cubancurls
Grand Goobah Caedran, Aqueous Infusion of Demulcents, Order of the Curly Crusaders

Fia 2cFi, fine texture, med porosity CG 5-29-09 * My hair loves protein! Currently using : DermOrganics Shampoo and IHM, G2B Kinkier Mousse, Re:Coil VMM, Anything Spiral Solutions! MO Sealing. Coconut Oil Pre-Poo, once a month Hard Water shampoo. Avoiding Glycerin in finishing products.

Before I was a stylist, I was a waitress. I can unequivocally say with the fiercest determination that unless you have spent time behind the chair you don't know how easy a waitress has it compared to me as a stylist. I have to disagree with you iroc over the costs of education being paid by the salon. Never in 20+ years has an owner paid for me to attend a class ever. I have been an employee my entire career as booth renting is illegal in New Jersey, while it is legal in Florida, you have to have a full book and have worked for a long time in the area to have enough clients to be able to afford to rent. Also, I don't consider wait staff salaried employees, they depend on their tips (to insure Promptness) to make up the difference in lack of pay. I receive no pay of any kind if no one comes through the door, I don't make anything.
I also want to say that you can pay your stylist without money in the currency that keeps on giving and can be as good as cold hard cash. REFERRALS!!!!!, no stylist can do her job without clients. Give out cards, talk him or her up, tell them your name, write your name on the back of her card so she knows it's you. My biggest referring client gets her hair cut twice a year, I make 48.00 on her. She sent me 25 count them 25 clients a year I made hundreds of dollars on.So I hear, "I met this girl, I can't remember her name, wait I have a card, I was getting my mammogram..." or "I was in the Atlanta airport waiting for my flight when this girl says, curly girl I see you, what flight are you on? You need to see my stylist" You will be the most favorite client, and like my client Lynn get free stuff, glazes and conditioning treatments and full size products to test market for me. So, if your broke, send people, make her some healthy snacks, a salad for lunch with some soup and crackers, maybe a smoothie, just for no reason about 1:30 is good. Just because you apreciate her and can't pay her as much doesn't make you any less valuable as a client. And no self respecting stylist is so callous as to turn away someone who can't tip, they tell them what I told you guys, just send people. And if they don't, you don't want them to do your hair anyway. The client is our breathing calling card, a beautiful well kept head of curls is our best most effective advertising. So go out and reel in some new fish for your stylist, they will love you for it. I know I do.
Cynthia
Being of service is not the same thing a being a servant. I am proud to be of service everyday.
Oh my gosh, I am not in the service business and after reading this -glad I am not -- but never expected such a broo ha ha over tips. I tip because I want to and in this country (US) -correct me if I am wrong, but most of us tip the bellboy a couple of bucks for taking our bags up to our room. I play golf once a week and tip the fellow who takes my clubs out of the car and puts them in my cart, he then cleans the clubs off and puts them back in the car -- do I expect him to do that for nothing -- no I don't. Can't believe some of these comments, I really wonder sometimes about people.
I'm in full agreement with those who say the stylist should be tipped well, but I have to disagree in another area. I left a salon because whenever I was there, someone shampooed my hair, someone else cut it, and then someone else colored it --not to mention whoever did my brows. Since I know that proper etiquette dictates that anyone who works on your hair is tipped, I did tip all of them, but I was very annoyed at feeling like I was being nickeled and dimed to death having to tip 3-4 people in addition to the cost of the services. The guy I go to now does it all, does it well (usually lol), gets tipped well, and I don't feel hassled about tipping 65 people.

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