I don't think it's fair to tip 15% to stylist...

I don't think one should leave a tip, unless it is a very good job and you want to leave a tip, otherwise i don't believe in that. I am a nurse and nobody leaves me a tip for doing a good job, I do a good job bc i have to do a good job, and the same should be with any other profession. They are getting pay regardless. Same thing in restaurants, i do leave a tip in restaurants bc i know that they get pay very low, h/w it is just a way for restaurants owners not to pay them properly, so who are we incentive is not the workers but the owners to pay them less than what they should.
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2B-2C
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Again nurses get a salary. Waitstaff and the like don't.

I only get a trim from my stylist 2-3 three times a year, and it's his salon but I almost always tip. Even if I didn't have the extra cash on my, the service has always been the same. Every Christmas he sends out cards with a gift certificate to any service in the salon. A few times I went for an early appointment and he had coffee, cake and bagels for the workers and his customers.

I make SURE to tip him, even if it's just a few extra dollars. I know how expensive that industry is and how most salon owners, nevermind stylists aren't rolling in dough.
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[/B]
yes a bribe. At least in wait staff you tip based on the level of customer service you recieved. So if they know they will get more money for being better and having greatcustomer service, then that is their incentive. It is the main reason they work so hard.
Originally Posted by TheSunshineState
Well, is bribe the word to use here? I do understand the sentiment, like if you go back to a stylist you've tipped 10% in the past you won't get very good service.
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Last edited by TillyMunchyWaves; 09-19-2009 at 04:14 PM. Reason: change
I was taught by my mother to tip hairstylists. I feel its kind like saying thank you. You should say thank you to everyone...in the hair styling/cutting world, a tip is the best way to say thank you. It shows the stylist that they did a good job; their education, personal knowledge and attitude was superb and they deserve a reward. It teaches them that a job well done is worth something. That their precious time is worth something. Sure, you can say this is a bribe or whatever you want. That's great. I just feel that tips are necessary.

You get more bees with honey than vinegar...
Speaking from a stylists stand point, not all stylists rent their chairs. There some places that the stylists are paid salary and really expect or love the tips they get.

I used to work for REGIS Hair salon and I was strictly on salary so I really worked hard for the tips I got. So I think it is thoughtful to tip if you are happy with the service you get.

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I was taught by my mother to tip hairstylists. I feel its kind like saying thank you. You should say thank you to everyone...in the hair styling/cutting world, a tip is the best way to say thank you. It shows the stylist that they did a good job; their education, personal knowledge and attitude was superb and they deserve a reward. It teaches them that a job well done is worth something. That their precious time is worth something. Sure, you can say this is a bribe or whatever you want. That's great. I just feel that tips are necessary.

You get more bees with honey than vinegar...
Originally Posted by laynesavedtheday
But can't I say thank you by saying "Thank you!" I'm never rude or mean to the person, no vinegar here.
I let them know if I like what they did. I appreciate it by actually paying them the price I was told that service costs.


TillyMunchyWaves - Maybe bribe was a stong word to use but I just get this comical image in my head of me sitting at a table. I start waving a fan of money in the servers face and going "come on! gooood server! do you wanna treat? good server!" and then they do a nice little trick called customer service, and they get their treat for doing the trick well.
This is such an interesting thread for me because clients never want to talk about money. Would it be more comfortable if the price were 25% higher and there was a strict no tipping policy. I have toyed around with this idea for a few years and would be interested in your feedback.
Cynthia
This is such an interesting thread for me because clients never want to talk about money. Would it be more comfortable if the price were 25% higher and there was a strict no tipping policy. I have toyed around with this idea for a few years and would be interested in your feedback.
Cynthia
Originally Posted by curlpro
wonderful idea! i hate trying to figure out when to tip. no longer really worry about it since i rarely visit salons.
Life shrinks or expands according to one's courage. Anais Nin
But can't I say thank you by saying "Thank you!" I'm never rude or mean to the person, no vinegar here.
Originally Posted by TheSunshineState
And you know what? That's wonderful! I've never worked in any of the "official" service industries (the beauty or restaurant industries, for example) but I've worked in industries that had me providing services directly to customers. Since I wasn't receiving tips, the kind customers always made my day much brighter, just as the lousy customers always brought my day down. However, great customers don't put food on the table, and they don't make up for crappy pay.

I ask everyone this - would you accept a pay decrease of 10-20%, if it meant people might smile and say "thank you" more often? How would you feel if someone made that decision for you? There's no right answer to these questions, but I think they're good food for thought.

In short - smiling is wonderful, but if that smile comes with a tip, it's even better.

I let them know if I like what they did. I appreciate it by actually paying them the price I was told that service costs.
Originally Posted by TheSunshineState
I think the point is that, in this industry, a tip is an unwritten part of the service cost. It's an odd system, and it would certainly be easier all around if the full price were written, but this also gives customers the ability to tip within a range of "acceptable" percentages to indicate their level of pleasure or displeasure with the services received. What may have started out as an optional "bonus," however, seems (as far as I can tell) to have been corrupted into an excuse that upper management members in some industries use to provide a sub-living wage to their employees. Maybe tips used to be optional, but now since they're generally widely expected, management can decide to pay less to the workers since "oh, they'll just earn tips to make up the difference!"


Maybe bribe was a stong word to use but I just get this comical image in my head of me sitting at a table. I start waving a fan of money in the servers face and going "come on! gooood server! do you wanna treat? good server!" and then they do a nice little trick called customer service, and they get their treat for doing the trick well.
Originally Posted by TheSunshineState
Yikes! I definitely don't mean to ruffle any feathers here, but... isn't that a little condescending? I think it's good to remember that servers are people, too, and deserve to be treated as such =)
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Ididn't mean for it to be condescending to the person at all so sorry. I just get this funny image in my head when I think about the system. Because they usually do it the way they do for the tips.
I have a question for the stylists!!!

This is an anthropological curiosity: do you notice any difference in how men and women tip, or is it about equal?

*I know generalizations can be really stupid, so I just wonder if, in your experience, there is any difference.

Also, I think that the tipping of stylists is less well understood than the tipping of waitstaff and this might have to do with the fact that many people have much less experience getting their hair styled as they do eating out. For instance, I definitely tip very well in restaurants, having worked in the service industry for a while and I ALWAYS tip my stylist 20%, so long as they aren't horrible. Additionally, if the cut or color does end up pretty horrible and they offer to fix it at another time, free of charge, I then tip them 50% of what the cost of the service would have been. I thought I was on top of things, but I never EVER even thought of tipping the shampoo girl/guy until I read this thread. Now I feel like a jerk...

Anyway, when consumers understand the industry they tend to tip better and, unfortunately for stylists, they might see a lot of people who don't understand their business well.

CG as of June 28th
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Not sure about my curl type, but I think it varies all around my head.
Using Devacurl product line: No-Poo, One Condition, and Angell
.

Additionally, if the cut or color does end up pretty horrible and they offer to fix it at another time, free of charge, I then tip them 50% of what the cost of the service would have been.
Originally Posted by nj001
if the cut/color was horrible and the stylist offers to fix it for free, why tip 50% of the cost? that is almost like paying twice for the same service. it is very nice of you...
Life shrinks or expands according to one's courage. Anais Nin
I was taught by my mother to tip hairstylists. I feel its kind like saying thank you. You should say thank you to everyone...in the hair styling/cutting world, a tip is the best way to say thank you. It shows the stylist that they did a good job; their education, personal knowledge and attitude was superb and they deserve a reward. It teaches them that a job well done is worth something. That their precious time is worth something. Sure, you can say this is a bribe or whatever you want. That's great. I just feel that tips are necessary.

You get more bees with honey than vinegar...
Originally Posted by laynesavedtheday
But can't I say thank you by saying "Thank you!" I'm never rude or mean to the person, no vinegar here.
I let them know if I like what they did. I appreciate it by actually paying them the price I was told that service costs.


TillyMunchyWaves - Maybe bribe was a stong word to use but I just get this comical image in my head of me sitting at a table. I start waving a fan of money in the servers face and going "come on! gooood server! do you wanna treat? good server!" and then they do a nice little trick called customer service, and they get their treat for doing the trick well.
Originally Posted by TheSunshineState
TheSunshineState:

Perhaps you haven't looked at it in this light, but the "system" is set up so that you are paying the servers wages. Like it or not, you are essentially the server's employer, in that sense, and you agree to this when you agree to eat at a restaurant.

Furthermore, servers are often REQUIRED to tip-out the other restaurant employees (bartenders, food-runners, and bussers, those other employees who also do not make a paycheck) a percentage of their sales. I repeat: they must tip out on a percentagee of their sales, not their tips. That means, when you don't tip me, your waitress, or when you've tipped poorly I have paid to serve you. Literally. For me, that sucks.

How pleased would you be with your employer if they chose to thank you for your work, rather than pay you? Probably not very pleased.

I'm never very happy when I get a tip from a table I've been waiting on, the folks who have been so nice and polite since they sat down, and I find out they've ripped me off on my paycheck. In addition to working so hard on their table, I paid for their service. However, I'm bright enough to realize that these people often do this unknowingly.

The regular customers who come into restaurants and are known to be "good tippers" might, indeed, get better service than someone who is known for tipping poorly. But this isn't a comical scene, it is a fact of life. You are likely work harder and be a happier employee when your boss pays you, rather than if they were to smile and thank you for your service.

Your employer may pay you more discreetly, and in a envelope or direct-deposit or whatever, but your paycheck is the same thing as a waiter's tips.

CG as of June 28th
Medium texture/very porous/low elasticity.
Not sure about my curl type, but I think it varies all around my head.
Using Devacurl product line: No-Poo, One Condition, and Angell
.

Additionally, if the cut or color does end up pretty horrible and they offer to fix it at another time, free of charge, I then tip them 50% of what the cost of the service would have been.
Originally Posted by nj001
if the cut/color was horrible and the stylist offers to fix it for free, why tip 50% of the cost? that is almost like paying twice for the same service. it is very nice of you...
Originally Posted by Windflower
Heh. Well, I'd consider it paying 1.5 times for two services, but that's semantics!

In the service industry, it's customary to tip 50% of the cost of food if the restaurant purchases a dish for you (think: a manager gives your some kind of "meal comp" because you were unhappy with your soup/ found a hair/nail/rock/ladybug in your food).

Understandably, you may have ordered a ladybug free salad the first time, but food still went out. Ingredients were used, time was spent by several individuals to make the food.

I figure, maybe my hair didn't come out the way I liked the first time, but the stylist still has to use more product on my hair, spend time working on it, and that time could be spent on someone who is paying full price, instead. Plus, it's just kind of them to offer to do something for free, they deserve extra for that, in my opinion!

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Not sure about my curl type, but I think it varies all around my head.
Using Devacurl product line: No-Poo, One Condition, and Angell
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Ok here goes, Men tip better. Usually 30%-50%. In their defense, their ticket is less and half the time I am squeezing them in or they are late. If for some reason someone doesn't like or needs an adjustment to their cut or color, they may try to tip me but I never accept. You pay the first time for what you want and I give you three weeks to get any adjustment for free. I also trim the bangs (per say) for free if they get too long in between visits. But only if you come on a regular schedule (like every three months).

So this brings me to another bone of contention as a stylist far mor irritating that tipping.. How much advance notice do you think you need to give your stylist when you change your appointment time? And, do you think you owe her some compensation for the time you wasted that she couldn't re-book if that cancellation is last minute? Just to be clear, I am talking about a stylist that doesn't get paid by the hour but is a renter or on comission only.
Cynthia
Ok here goes, Men tip better. Usually 30%-50%. In their defense, their ticket is less and half the time I am squeezing them in or they are late. If for some reason someone doesn't like or needs an adjustment to their cut or color, they may try to tip me but I never accept. You pay the first time for what you want and I give you three weeks to get any adjustment for free. I also trim the bangs (per say) for free if they get too long in between visits. But only if you come on a regular schedule (like every three months).

So this brings me to another bone of contention as a stylist far mor irritating that tipping.. How much advance notice do you think you need to give your stylist when you change your appointment time? And, do you think you owe her some compensation for the time you wasted that she couldn't re-book if that cancellation is last minute? Just to be clear, I am talking about a stylist that doesn't get paid by the hour but is a renter or on comission only.
Cynthia
Originally Posted by curlpro
Many salons have a 24-hour or 48-hour rule. If you don't cancel within that time period, you're still charged some amount of money. Other places just make some kind of note about how they would appreciate said amount of notice. I think it would make the most sense if the appointment was rescheduled and then the stylist was tipped appropriately for having missed the first appointment.

As you said yourself, different stylists are compensated differently. Most customers don't ask about how their stylist is paid, in order to figure this stuff out. Because it's different from salon to salon, I think it's helpful if the expectations are made clear prior to scheduling an appointment.

CG as of June 28th
Medium texture/very porous/low elasticity.
Not sure about my curl type, but I think it varies all around my head.
Using Devacurl product line: No-Poo, One Condition, and Angell
.
I thought of this thread today while getting my hair done. I had hair & brow color, brow waxing, and a blowout.

I've been seeing my stylist for about 5 years, and he never charges me for my "birthday blowout" that I get this time every year. It's his way of saying Happy Birthday, and a bit of a thank you since I have referred quite a few curlies to him.

But, I dip tip more than normal. I tipped 40%. Why? I mean, I knew the blowout would be free. But, I also know that blowouts are no joke on me. My hair is long and coarse enough to take some time. He was sweating with all of that heat by the time he was done, and it is never a quick thing for me to get decent looking straight hair. Lots of blow dryer, flat iron, lots of silicone today with the high dewpoint, etc. He took the time and effort to do it right, even though he did it for free.

He's an awesome guy, and probably deserves way more than I tip, but I am glad he's my stylist.
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Ok here goes, Men tip better. Usually 30%-50%. In their defense, their ticket is less and half the time I am squeezing them in or they are late. If for some reason someone doesn't like or needs an adjustment to their cut or color, they may try to tip me but I never accept. You pay the first time for what you want and I give you three weeks to get any adjustment for free. I also trim the bangs (per say) for free if they get too long in between visits. But only if you come on a regular schedule (like every three months).

So this brings me to another bone of contention as a stylist far mor irritating that tipping.. How much advance notice do you think you need to give your stylist when you change your appointment time? And, do you think you owe her some compensation for the time you wasted that she couldn't re-book if that cancellation is last minute? Just to be clear, I am talking about a stylist that doesn't get paid by the hour but is a renter or on comission only.
Cynthia
Originally Posted by curlpro
Many salons have a 24-hour or 48-hour rule. If you don't cancel within that time period, you're still charged some amount of money. Other places just make some kind of note about how they would appreciate said amount of notice. I think it would make the most sense if the appointment was rescheduled and then the stylist was tipped appropriately for having missed the first appointment.

As you said yourself, different stylists are compensated differently. Most customers don't ask about how their stylist is paid, in order to figure this stuff out. Because it's different from salon to salon, I think it's helpful if the expectations are made clear prior to scheduling an appointment.
Originally Posted by nj001
Fat chance! Unless you have a pre authorized credit card slip signed by the client, and even then, they can dispute it with the cc company. So unles you all want to stop in and pay in advance, we're screwed out of the money. I have clients that are so nice to me when they have to miss a scheduled appointment for a meeting or confrence call sick child etc.. but they always call and always give me $30. ish to cover the time missed. It's the ones who call that day and stand you up with no call so you wait all day, that never pay or apologize. It is a given in this business, the only people who waste more time than a stylist waiting for people are Realtor's. All your great clients make up for it, I just call one that's close and have lunch or coffee.
Cynthia
I tip my regular stylist 20%. Always. She does an amazing job with my cut and color (and occassional highlights). My hair upkeep costs a good deal and I consider it a good investment.

If you can't tip your stylist 15-20% (and your shampoo guy/gal if that applies) then you shouldn't be going to a salon for your hair. Or switch to a less expensive salon, where you can afford the tip.

I also treat my stylist how I would like to be treated. I book 1-2 appointments 1-3 months out at a time. I get the appointment times that work best for me this way. I rarely (unless there is an emergency) change my hair appointment. I consider my stylist a pro in her field and I treat her as I would any other professional. In turn, she has fit me in at the last minute when I have needed her too.

I lived in NYC for many years and often was a "salon hair model" so that I could get a cut (or more often color) for free or a low/minimal charge. During this time I always tipped the stylist 20% of what the cut/color would have cost. They may have been younger stylists who were just learning but I know they relied on tips for their income.

It is just the right thing to do.
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I think it really depends on the situation - if the stylist makes a serious effort to accomodate you and your hair needs and does an excellent job, they do deserve a good tip, in my opinion. If they do a haphazard job and/or aren't that nice or accomodating and/or insult your hair, etc., that's a different story entirely. You're never going to get anyone to agree on these things, but I do think tipping is a matter of courtesy and showing your appreciation plus, as others have mentioned, it will often pay off in other ways as well.

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