Seborrheic dermatitis. Anyone else deal with this?

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I was not given a special conditioner, but was given a prescription shampoo. The shampoo has an over the counter version, Nizoral which I use a couple times a week and that seems to control it.

Something else the dermatologist gave me for when it gets really, really bad is the oral medication for vaginal yeast infections. I take one of those pills when it's really bad. I guess some doctors feel this is caused by an overabundance of yeast in the body...and it does seem to help with bad flair ups.
So far just experimenting with anything and everything!!!!
Oh, and I have very fine, thin hair anyway. I haven't noticed it getting any thinner, but it's hard to tell when your hair is so fine anyway. Plus, mine is very short.
So far just experimenting with anything and everything!!!!
Mine has gotten so much better. In the beginning I was given a prescription shampoo and steroid creams for my face. I decided to ditch those and do the curly girl method and the oil cleanse method for my face. That helped more than the prescription stuff. Lately, I've been putting coconut oil on my scalp at night and sleeping in it. That has almost completely gotten my SD under control. My face is great too since I use coconut oil on it. I'm also taking a vegetarian omega 3 supplement and black currant oil. Those might be helping as well. Coconut oil is supposed to be anti fungal I believe. The conditioners from Trader Joe's help too...the tea tree tingle and the nourish spa. I co-wash with them.
Started CG July 8, 2008


3

Pre Co-wash: Coconut oil (plain & rosemary)
Co-wash: Trader Joe's Tea Tree Tingle or Trader Joe's Nourish Spa
Rinse out: GVP Conditioning Balm
Leave-in/Styling: Moisture Maniac with Kenra Moisturizing Conditioner on top
can this cause excessive shedding as well? I was diagnosed with this two years ago and no doc told me until just now. They say some of my hair loss can be from this. But they told me medicated shampoo daily. I dno't know how you all have found you can control it otherwise. Also, they gave me only one kind of conditioner I can use and it has dimethicone. Go figure. So frustrating. Now I don't know what to do.
Originally Posted by mamaherrera
I can't speak to the shedding because only a very small part of my scalp is affected. However, I have found that -- short of prescriptions -- the only thing that really helps me is a shampoo with coal tar, such as Neutrogena T-gel. Fortunately, so far I can get away with using it on just that small section of scalp.

Sometimes I apply it to my scalp before my shower (on a dry head) and leave it on up to an hour before rinsing. Seems to help!
shoulder-length 3a/b, depending on weather and products (or lack of products!)

Last edited by alacurl; 08-12-2012 at 11:37 PM. Reason: to fix typo
They say I have SD but I'm not sure because I while I have it on my face, my scalp so far isn't flaking and itching. It's an angry scalp in that everything I put on it makes it uncomfortable.

Chagrin Valley Soap Co. makes shampoo bars and a couple of them are good for problematic scalp. I also have hair loss going on too. I tried the herb garden and I saw less hair loss and scalp felt good. You can buy sample size to test it. I like it and there's not one bad ingredient in it. Customer service is bar none! Check them out.

Shampoo Bars || Chagrin Valley Soap
Ever since August or end of July I went to the dermatologist and he told me I had sd some ezecma and Pityriasis alba .The Pityriasis alba is just lighter parts of my skin.But I wondered have ezecma and sd been causes of my hair growth.I had a really bad flaky scalp somethimes but honestly I dont wash my hair that much and when I started washing it more..it went away it seemed.I used shampoo but recently just use tremmmes naturals conditoner and paul mitchell condioner ,it still hasnt been flaking up since.I was starting to think that I just needed to wash my hair more with these products. I have been having other female problems and I dont know if it deals with my hair but I think some of it deals with skin and the skin deals with scalp and so I think they run hand in hand.I was happy to see sd on this site because I was wondering if it was on here and if other people dealt with it.How often do you wash your hair? I only do it once every two weeks or week because my hair can be very dry.
Hello, I'm new here. I have 2a/2c waves, and low-porosity hair. Recently, I got a medicated shampoo for my SD, and found that though my scalp is happy, my hair isn't. My hair looks dry but shiny and stringy after washing with this shampoo, and I cannot fathom why, because it does not have cones in it. I suspect it caused a build-up on my hair because my hair looks like it has been gelled. Here is the ingredient list of the shampoo:

Ingredients: Aqua/water, Sodium Laureth Sulphate, Citric Acid, Disodium Cocoamphodiacetate, Glycol Distearate, Ammonium Hydroxide, PEG-55 Propylene Glycol Oleate, Propylene Glycol, Sodium Chloride, Hexylene Glycol, Disodium Ricinoleamido mea-sulfosuccinate, Polyquaternium-10, Parfum/Fragrance, Piroctone Olamine, Slalicylic Acid, Sodium Methylparaben, Carbomer, DMDM Hydantoin, Linalool, Limonene, Methylparaben.

I have used another sulfate shampoo to clear the build up, but when I used this shampoo again, the build up came back immediately. Could it be that there is a non-silicon ingredient causing the build up?

Last edited by DoYaThang; 12-14-2012 at 09:41 PM.
Hello, I'm new here. I have 2a/2c waves, and low-porosity hair. Recently, I got a medicated shampoo for my SD, and found that though my scalp is happy, my hair isn't. My hair looks dry but shiny and stringy after washing with this shampoo, and I cannot fathom why, because it does not have cones in it. I suspect it caused a build-up on my hair because my hair looks like it has been gelled. Here is the ingredient list of the shampoo:

Ingredients: Aqua/water, Sodium Laureth Sulphate, Citric Acid, Disodium Cocoamphodiacetate, Glycol Distearate, Ammonium Hydroxide, PEG-55 Propylene Glycol Oleate, Propylene Glycol, Sodium Chloride, Hexylene Glycol, Disodium Ricinoleamido mea-sulfosuccinate, Polyquaternium-10, Parfum/Fragrance, Piroctone Olamine, Slalicylic Acid, Sodium Methylparaben, Carbomer, DMDM Hydantoin, Linalool, Limonene, Methylparaben.

I have used another sulfate shampoo to clear the build up, but when I used this shampoo again, the build up came back immediately. Could it be that there is a non-silicon ingredient causing the build up?
Originally Posted by DoYaThang
Probably not likely as it has a sulfate to clean anything that might build up. But it could be an ingredient interacting with another product you use. Also, consider coating your hair with conditioner before shampooing, then use as little shampoo as possible - apply it to your fingertips then massage it into your scalp really well while avoiding the length as much as possible. Do this in sections if you need to - applying more shampoo to your fingertips as needed. Rinse really well. See if you can find a balance where you don't get the yucky results on your hair but still effectively treat the scalp condition. Another option might be to cleanse the scalp with that shampoo while avoiding the length, then cleanse the length with the other shampoo, avoiding the scalp. Just throwing out a couple of things you might try.
remember, with all advice or suggestions for your hair, YMMV!!
My hair:
2b wavy, medium texture, low porosity, med-high density. Protein finicky.
My routine:
Cleansing: DCNP, every 4-5 days (occasionally use CJ cleansers).
RO: CJSC, occasionally use JCDC
LI: KCKT or CJSL
Gel: KCCC, CJCIAB for 2nd day hair (sometimes third)

Heat is my friend: warm water rinses, steam caps, and diffuse dry. I love CLU cloths and my Denman.
I was diagnosed with SD maybe 3 years ago, but always did a weekly (or bi-weekly) blowout/flat iron styling. I ended up with a routine of using Dermarest shampoo that I added peppermint EO to, and conditioning with a TT or anti-dandruff conditioner with more peppermint EO. The day before I would generally do a pre-wash treatment of coconut oil w/ peppermint EO added to it. All of this helped me keep my flakes and itches at bay for the week.

However, I started going back to my curls maybe 3-4 weeks ago. I noticed I don't always have itching, but when I do, the itchies are MAJOR and it's always where my SD is worse. Last night I noticed scaling, but I wasn't flaking. I'm not sure if this is a "transitional" point still in going to CG (or modified CG), or if my SD is in protest.

Is there any one way to figure this out? Or should I just go back to co-washing with a TT conditioner and add in peppermint EO or another EO good for dandruff?
I was diagnosed with SD maybe 3 years ago, but always did a weekly (or bi-weekly) blowout/flat iron styling. I ended up with a routine of using Dermarest shampoo that I added peppermint EO to, and conditioning with a TT or anti-dandruff conditioner with more peppermint EO. The day before I would generally do a pre-wash treatment of coconut oil w/ peppermint EO added to it. All of this helped me keep my flakes and itches at bay for the week.

However, I started going back to my curls maybe 3-4 weeks ago. I noticed I don't always have itching, but when I do, the itchies are MAJOR and it's always where my SD is worse. Last night I noticed scaling, but I wasn't flaking. I'm not sure if this is a "transitional" point still in going to CG (or modified CG), or if my SD is in protest.

Is there any one way to figure this out? Or should I just go back to co-washing with a TT conditioner and add in peppermint EO or another EO good for dandruff?
Originally Posted by aerisley
Sounds like you have been fighting the immediate symptoms instead of identifying and addressing the root cause(s). It's not clear to me what your old and new routines are, what the difference(s) are, can you give more detail please?

Using powerful essential oils can certainly help keep the malassezia yeast population down, but it can also be highly irritant so don't overdo it, more is not better when you have an inflammatory/ irritant skin condition. Ideally use the minimum effective amount at the minimum effective frequency.

Is the Dermarest a sulphate shampoo? If so that will likely have thinned and dehydrated your skin barrier, destroyed the beneficial skin flora and contributed to the underlying irritation/ inflammation, it can also cause the skin to pump out more sebum to protect itself which feeds malassezia. It can take some weeks for your skin barrier to repair and sebum production normalise after quitting harsh cleansers, but it may well not do so whilst you have active SD.

That doesn't mean you should put up with a dermatological disorder, but instead take baby steps. There are a couple of sulphate free shampoos that may be effective in seborrhoeic dermatitis - Neutrogena T-Sal (salicylic acid) or Regenepure (ketoconazole) for example. I would use these regularly for at least a month whilst your scalp has the chance to heal, then reassess. You might try alternating conditioner only washing with tea tree oil, you might try a super gentle sulphate free shampoo at pH 4.5 which respects the protective acid mantle/ beneficial skin flora and contains scalp friendly ingredients, you might continue as you are if you like the T-Sal or Regenepure.
http://www.regenepure.com/complete-l...redients.html/
http://www.ulta.com/ulta/browse/prod...Id=prod6031058
http://www.komazahaircare.com/moja-shampoo.html

Do not scratch and do not use heat (think hot showers, towel turbans/ longer plops, deep treatments, hairdryer) because all of these can increase irritation/ inflammation and histamine release, use cool water, cool air and cold compresses to relieve itching. Aloe vera inner leaf gel will not directly impact the SD but it has anti inflammatory, healing and collagen inducing properties so might be worth trying.

Also review your diet making it as anti inflammatory and nutrient dense as possible, especially consider your intake of oily fish (more long chain omega-3s), sugar and white refined carbs (ideally none). Targeted nutrition can strengthen the skin barrier, calm inappropriate immune responses, alter the amount and composition of your sebum, reduce systemic inflammation all of which play keys roles in SD. This may take some weeks to kick in so again be patient and consistent.
2a-2c, medium texture, porous/ colour treated. Three years CG. Past bra strap length heading for waist.

CO-wash: Inecto coconut/ Elvive Volume Collagen
Treatments: Komaza Care Matani, coconut/ sweet almond/ fractionated coconut oils, Hairveda Sitrinillah
Leave in: Fructis Sleek & Shine (old), Gliss Ultimate Volume, various Elvive
Styler: Umberto Giannini jelly, Au Naturale styling gelee
Flour sack towel, pixie diffuse or air dry.
Experimenting with: benign neglect

Last edited by Firefox7275; 07-11-2013 at 07:36 AM.
Sounds like you have been fighting the immediate symptoms instead of identifying and addressing the root cause(s). It's not clear to me what your old and new routines are, what the difference(s) are, can you give more detail please?
Originally Posted by Firefox7275

Using powerful essential oils can certainly help keep the malassezia yeast population down, but it can also be highly irritant so don't overdo it, more is not better when you have an inflammatory/ irritant skin condition. Ideally use the minimum effective amount at the minimum effective frequency.

Is the Dermarest a sulphate shampoo? If so that will likely have thinned and dehydrated your skin barrier, destroyed the beneficial skin flora and contributed to the underlying irritation/ inflammation, it can also cause the skin to pump out more sebum to protect itself which feeds malassezia. It can take some weeks for your skin barrier to repair and sebum production normalise after quitting harsh cleansers, but it may well not do so whilst you have active SD.
Originally Posted by Firefox7275
Before I went back to my curly hair, my routine was as follows: pre-wash treatment of coconut oil with peppermint EO for anywhere from a few hours to overnight. Shampoo with Dermarest (not sulfate-free and uses 3% salicylic acid) and a few drops of peppermint oil, and then follow-up a conditioner with a few more drops of peppermint oil. Since I was blow-drying and flat ironing it, I would then use a leave-in moisturizer from Elasta QP, and Tresemme heat protectant and a split end mender. I'd let my hair airdry as much as possible before parting it into 4 sections and blow-dry on medium heat using the low setting. I'd then use more heat protectant spray before flat ironing. I'd do this process once a week or every other week. It definitely helped, and as long as I didnít try to go more than two weeks between, I was virtually flake and itch free!

Now, I cowash maybe 2x a week with either Suave Naturals Tropical Coconut or As I Am Coconut CoWash. I use a homemade leave-in moisturizer using a mix of distilled water, coconut oil, glycerin and AVG with a few drops of lavender EO (or peppermint). I do a clarifying shampoo ever other week or so using V05 Kiwi Lime Squeeze, and a deeper conditioning treatment once a week or every other week using Tresemme Nourishing Rituals Rejuvenating Mud Masque. For styling I use SM CES followed by Elasta QP Liquid Gel (though I just made Eco Styler Gel Custard last night to start using). I also use Soft 'n Free Gro Healthy Nothing But Curl Wake Up Spray for 2nd and 3rd day hair to refresh the curls. Iíve been curly for almost 2 months now.
That doesn't mean you should put up with a dermatological disorder, but instead take baby steps. There are a couple of sulphate free shampoos that may be effective in seborrhoeic dermatitis - Neutrogena T-Sal (salicylic acid) or Regenepure (ketoconazole) for example. I would use these regularly for at least a month whilst your scalp has the chance to heal, then reassess. You might try alternating conditioner only washing with tea tree oil, you might try a super gentle sulphate free shampoo at pH 4.5 which respects the protective acid mantle/ beneficial skin flora and contains scalp friendly ingredients, you might continue as you are if you like the T-Sal or Regenepure.
Originally Posted by Firefox7275
Originally Posted by Firefox7275
When I was diagnosed, the dermatologist I saw at that time told me washing my hair more often than I was would help, and gave me a ketoconazole cream to use. I swear the cream made the flaking look worse! I ended up buying and using Giovanni TTTT shampoo and conditioner, and added peppermint to that. However, it quit working rather quickly, and thatís when I switched to the routine I mentioned above. I tried Neutrogena T-Sal in the past, but that was YEARS before I even experienced the SD as I did, and it did nothing at the time to help. I try to get products readily available as opposed to ordering online, and I donít have an Ulta near me to browse for new products.
Do not scratch and do not use heat (think hot showers, towel turbans/ longer plops, deep treatments, hairdryer) because all of these can increase irritation/ inflammation and histamine release, use cool water, cool air and cold compresses to relieve itching. Aloe vera inner leaf gel will not directly impact the SD but it has anti inflammatory, healing and collagen inducing properties so might be worth trying.
Originally Posted by Firefox7275

Also review your diet making it as anti inflammatory and nutrient dense as possible, especially consider your intake of oily fish (more long chain omega-3s), sugar and white refined carbs (ideally none). Targeted nutrition can strengthen the skin barrier, calm inappropriate immune responses, alter the amount and composition of your sebum, reduce systemic inflammation all of which play keys roles in SD. This may take some weeks to kick in so again be patient and consistent.
Originally Posted by Firefox7275
I try my very best not to scratch, and while I take a hot shower, I wash and rinse my hair using cool or cold waters. I donít plop my hair, and only leave a Turbie Twist on long enough to make it from the bathroom to the bedroom (though lately I donít use a towel on my hair at all). And since Iíve been curly, I havenít used any heating tools. I also take a Benadryl nightly to help me not break out in hives from sweating, which is another symptom I developed once the SD hit full force.

I do have glucose-intolerance and PCOS, so sugar and white refined carbs are already a battle Iím trying to overcome. So far neither my PCP nor my dermatologist have suggested any dietary changes to help with my SD, but it sounds like Iím already trying to battle against a potential cause. Also, I was taking fish oil, but I quit taking it. Not sure why, but I did a few months ago now.

Last edited by aerisley; 07-11-2013 at 08:42 AM.
SD is complex and simple at the same time. Research in dermatitis has taken great strides forwards in recent years, it's now known that sulphate surfactants can thin and dehydrate even healthy skin at concentrations as low as 1% tho my trigger for my elbow patch of atopic eczema was shampoo bubbles running down my arm.

Secondly the irritant in SD is believed to be oleic acid, a fatty acid found in your own sebum and also a waste product of the malassezia yeast. Scientists are able to induce SD simply by applying oliec acid to skin that is completely clear of malassezia. So success is most likely by addressing both the yeast AND the amount and composition of the sebum, not one or the other. Ideally rather than letting oleic acid rich sebum be produced and letting the yeast proliferate then stripping them you would block them at source, stop excess sebum release and prevent malassezia overgrowth.

Frequent cleansing massively reduces the population of malassezia and the sebum, so reducing symptoms which is why this is advocated. HOWEVER if you use a harsh shampoo you are thinning, dehydrating and irritating the skin barrier all of which make you more vulnerable to irritation from oleic acid, your own sweat, even fluoride or chlorine in tap water, and the sebaceous glands may pump out MORE oil in a desperate attempt to protect itself. So harsh cleansing actually sets up a vicious cycle.

There are several possible solutions all of which will be most effective when used holistically. Firstly you absolutely should cleanse frequently to keep the yeast and sebum down and likely use an anti fungal agent be that zinc, ketoconazole, tea tree or something else. However this cleansing should be as gentle as possible to allow the skin barrier to thicken, not cause further irritation and sebum production, permit the natural skin flora (friendly bacteria) to recover - this is part of your own defense system against malassezia overgrowth.

Conditioner only method is often not suitable for those with a scalp complaint. If you do go that route once you have given your skin barrier a chance to recover you would be wise to use products with as few gentle ingredients as possible, little that 'deposits', the right acidic pH for skin and hair. Coconut oil certainly has weak anti fungal properties, but it also has weak anti bacterial properties so may prevent your skin flora regenerating. Suave conditioners can be as high as pH 7.

I so wish I could advise you of appropriately formulated widely available products but unfortunately cosmetic science, pharmacy and dermatology have not caught up with avoiding oleic acid and sulphate surfactants in dermatitis. Online ordering is likely your best bet.

Thirdly research suggests that those with certain skin complaints (SD and acne) have more oleic acid in their sebum than the general population, diet modification can help with this. Lifestyle healthcare and self treatment is very underrated and underused, there is plenty of supporting research it's not a cranky alternative therapy but a legitimate field within healthcare.

It is unlikely one aspect of self care will be effective alone, they work synergistically. Something that irritates when you are attacking your poor scalp with harsh cleansers and eating an imbalanced diet will not necessarily irritate once your skin barrier is functioning well and you are eating anti inflammatory. I haven't had atopic eczema nor allergic contact dermatitis in over two years, all I had to do was quit sulphate surfactants in all hair, body and oral products and reduce my use of alkaline products (primarily hair dye).

Systemic inflammation is very likely an issue for you with PCOS, glucose intolerance and urticaria (hives), nutrient defiencies are also likely as they are with full blown type 2 diabetes. Are you eating oily fish regularly? Fish oil capsules are a good supplement but they should be just that, a supplement to a healthy balanced diet not a substitute. They only supply the long chain omega-3s, you miss out on bioavaiable vitamin D, protein and many other essential vitamins and minerals. The human body evolved to absorb and utilise nutrients in groups not isolation.

HTH.
aerisley likes this.
2a-2c, medium texture, porous/ colour treated. Three years CG. Past bra strap length heading for waist.

CO-wash: Inecto coconut/ Elvive Volume Collagen
Treatments: Komaza Care Matani, coconut/ sweet almond/ fractionated coconut oils, Hairveda Sitrinillah
Leave in: Fructis Sleek & Shine (old), Gliss Ultimate Volume, various Elvive
Styler: Umberto Giannini jelly, Au Naturale styling gelee
Flour sack towel, pixie diffuse or air dry.
Experimenting with: benign neglect

Last edited by Firefox7275; 07-11-2013 at 09:29 AM.
Firefox7275, that was a WEALTH of info! Thanks so much! I think I'll have to use a low-poo method since those are days I don't have any issues with itching. I found a few threads in a search with a lot of easily available low-poos, and I'm comparing them all now (actually about to start a thread asking about a particular line). Maybe my clarifying shampoo will have to be the Dermarest since I know for a fact it worked.

I don't eat fish regularly at all as I'm not a seafood person, and I don't at all eat shellfish. That being said, I'm not sure which fish are the oily ones to be eaten. I do know I've tried salmon a few times and never liked it, but I do like and can eat tilapia (and a tuna fish sandwich). I do however take 5000IUs of vitamin D nightly, but the iron in multi-vitamins makes me sick.

I truly appreciate your help! I'll be sure to find you whenever I have SD related questions since you're so helpful!
Firefox7275 likes this.
Firefox7275, that was a WEALTH of info! Thanks so much! I think I'll have to use a low-poo method since those are days I don't have any issues with itching. I found a few threads in a search with a lot of easily available low-poos, and I'm comparing them all now (actually about to start a thread asking about a particular line). Maybe my clarifying shampoo will have to be the Dermarest since I know for a fact it worked.

I don't eat fish regularly at all as I'm not a seafood person, and I don't at all eat shellfish. That being said, I'm not sure which fish are the oily ones to be eaten. I do know I've tried salmon a few times and never liked it, but I do like and can eat tilapia (and a tuna fish sandwich). I do however take 5000IUs of vitamin D nightly, but the iron in multi-vitamins makes me sick.

I truly appreciate your help! I'll be sure to find you whenever I have SD related questions since you're so helpful!
Originally Posted by aerisley
Every time you use a sulphate surfactant you damage your skin barrier and set yourself back, why do you need to clarify aren't you using only water soluble products and ingredients?

A pH appropriate shampoo based on cocoamidopropyl betaine will remove everything sulphates do without the damage and irritation. If you go more commercial low-poo avoid any products containing much in the way of oils or butters rich in oleic acid (known irritant), stearic or palmitic acids (feeds malassezia) - annoyingly that is most oils and butters!!

Neither tilapia nor canned tuna counts as oily fish unfortunately. Very oily fish include sardines/ pilchards, mackerel, herring and anchovies; moderately oily fish include salmon, trout and fresh tuna. Canned sardines, mackerel and salmon are beneficial they are cooked in the can so don't lose the essential fatty acids, tuna is cooked out of the can so the oils are lost.

I used to hate fish to the point I gagged the first time I opened a can of salmon but I was sick enough not to work so HAD to retrain my tastebuds. If you don't like lumps of fish you might experiment with different recipes - canned fish pate (fish mashed with low fat soft cheese) is tasty and easy. I absolutely adore trout and mackerel now, not big on fresh salmon or tuna.
2a-2c, medium texture, porous/ colour treated. Three years CG. Past bra strap length heading for waist.

CO-wash: Inecto coconut/ Elvive Volume Collagen
Treatments: Komaza Care Matani, coconut/ sweet almond/ fractionated coconut oils, Hairveda Sitrinillah
Leave in: Fructis Sleek & Shine (old), Gliss Ultimate Volume, various Elvive
Styler: Umberto Giannini jelly, Au Naturale styling gelee
Flour sack towel, pixie diffuse or air dry.
Experimenting with: benign neglect
Every time you use a sulphate surfactant you damage your skin barrier and set yourself back, why do you need to clarify aren't you using only water soluble products and ingredients?

A pH appropriate shampoo based on cocoamidopropyl betaine will remove everything sulphates do without the damage and irritation. If you go more commercial low-poo avoid any products containing much in the way of oils or butters rich in oleic acid (known irritant), stearic or palmitic acids (feeds malassezia) - annoyingly that is most oils and butters!!

Neither tilapia nor canned tuna counts as oily fish unfortunately. Very oily fish include sardines/ pilchards, mackerel, herring and anchovies; moderately oily fish include salmon, trout and fresh tuna. Canned sardines, mackerel and salmon are beneficial they are cooked in the can so don't lose the essential fatty acids, tuna is cooked out of the can so the oils are lost.

I used to hate fish to the point I gagged the first time I opened a can of salmon but I was sick enough not to work so HAD to retrain my tastebuds. If you don't like lumps of fish you might experiment with different recipes - canned fish pate (fish mashed with low fat soft cheese) is tasty and easy. I absolutely adore trout and mackerel now, not big on fresh salmon or tuna.
Originally Posted by Firefox7275
Valid point made regarding water soluble products! I'm trying to use as much natural stuff/homemade as I can too. It's definitely still a learning curve for me! Now, what I need to learn to understand is dew points LOL!

I'll start trying to work on the fish thing... I need to overall anyway LOL!
Valid point made regarding water soluble products! I'm trying to use as much natural stuff/homemade as I can too. It's definitely still a learning curve for me! Now, what I need to learn to understand is dew points LOL!

I'll start trying to work on the fish thing... I need to overall anyway LOL!
Originally Posted by aerisley
I don't fully understand dew points either, just know certain numbers make certain ingredients a no no. Meh.
2a-2c, medium texture, porous/ colour treated. Three years CG. Past bra strap length heading for waist.

CO-wash: Inecto coconut/ Elvive Volume Collagen
Treatments: Komaza Care Matani, coconut/ sweet almond/ fractionated coconut oils, Hairveda Sitrinillah
Leave in: Fructis Sleek & Shine (old), Gliss Ultimate Volume, various Elvive
Styler: Umberto Giannini jelly, Au Naturale styling gelee
Flour sack towel, pixie diffuse or air dry.
Experimenting with: benign neglect
Hey there!

I also suffer from occasional bouts of SD. A derm recently told me that I should use in rotation shampoos with the following ingredients:

Tar
T-Gel
Pentrax
DHS Tar

Salicylic Acid
DHS SAL
T-Sal

Selenium Sulfide
Head & Shoulders (dark blue bottle)
Selsun Blue

Pyrithione Zinc
DHS Zinc
Zincon
Head & Shoulders (white bottle)

I believe the above ingredients are various anti-fungals which keep the Malassezia colonies under control.

So they will work. For me however, harsh shampoos seem to aggravate my SD, maybe because they cause an overproduction of sebum/oil on my scalp. Unfortunately most of the above shampoos contain sulfates so I don't use them regularly. Luckily my SD is not constant even if it is recurring so I just use my regular low-poos to cleanse and if I get an episode of SD I clear it with Selsun Blue (always have a small bottle for emergencies). In the event of an SD episode, I shampoo with Selsun Blue 1-3 times and it goes away for months, half a year or even longer.

There is some evidence of using raw honey to treat SD, which I've always found interesting: Therapeutic and prophylactic effects of crude ... [Eur J Med Res. 2001] - PubMed - NCBI

Keep in mind I am not a dermatologist and even if I were I wouldn't be assessing/prescribing anything to you over the internet! I'm just posting about my experience and providing some information. The information is certainly not a replacement for a professional opinion. Please consult your dermatologist!
Firefox7275 likes this.
2BC/f/II. fine - low/normal porosity - medium density - normal elasticity.

Currently using:
Cowash: Cure Care diluted with water 1:1
RO: Cure Care, V05 Kiwi Lime
Styler: UFD CM (old formula), FSG + CNPF
PT: IAgirl's gelatine

Experimenting with: CeraVe Foaming as low-poo, gelatin gel

light moisture, hydrolized protein, jelly stylers
guar hydroxypropyltrimonium chloride, sulfates
Neutral on cones.

iherb discount code: CFN646
I have used Suave Scalp Solutions anti-dandruff Conditioner as a co-wash to help flaking. Has anyone used Shea Moistures African black soap line of shampoo or conditioner? Its made specifically for these scalp problems.
2c/3a, botticelli/s'wavy, thick hair
First Devacut 3.5.14, CG 9.11.14
Pic not me but looks like a hair twin.

GOD really loves you. ∞

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