Well, this is interesting... You Can Touch My Hair Exhibit

Like Tree24Likes

New York City Art Exhibit Lets Strangers Touch Varied Textures of Black Hair | Clutch Magazine

New art exhibit let's people touch natural hair.
2C, Medium/Fine, Low Porosity, High Density - CG since 5.19.12
Cowash: Burt's Bee's More Moisture Boabab
[B]Conditioner/LI: Nature's Gate Tea Tree Conditioner - I don't RO
Styling Products: KCCC, KY, Deva Arc AnGel, HESMU
I would be one of the people touching the various kinds of hair. : )
In Western PA
Found NC in 2004. CG since 2-05, going grey since 9-05. 3B with some 3A.
Hair texture-medium/fine, porosity-normal except for the ends which are porous, elasticity-normal.
Suave & VO5 cond, LA Looks Sport Gel, oils, honey, vinegar.
http://public.fotki.com/jeepcurlygurl/ password jeepy **updated Feb 2014**
https://www.facebook.com/lifetheuniverseandtodd
I would be one of the people touching the various kinds of hair. : )
Originally Posted by jeepcurlygurl
Ditto! My girlfriends hair is all natural and I keep telling her one day I am gonna touch it. It's just so beautiful and I'm so tactile that I can't help but fight the urge.
2C, Medium/Fine, Low Porosity, High Density - CG since 5.19.12
Cowash: Burt's Bee's More Moisture Boabab
[B]Conditioner/LI: Nature's Gate Tea Tree Conditioner - I don't RO
Styling Products: KCCC, KY, Deva Arc AnGel, HESMU
Let's face it, if blacks and non-blacks socialized and dated more, there would be more touching of each others' hair and bodies. There wouldn't be some big question about what "black hair" feels like. "Black hair" wouldn't be on display like some exotic animal in a zoo. I think the fact that such an exhibit was inspired in 2013 could be a sad reminder that our society still suffers racial segregation.

And so, when people inevitably protest this exhibit, their visceral reactions are partially due to the fact that this exhibit is, at its heart, a representation of modern day segregation. The exhibit may also be suggestive of a kind of fetishizing of a politically disenfranchised group of people. Pain-provoking for some.

That said, the exhibit also educates people. Life is complex.
3b/c?

Ringlet Fandango! ... Where curly ideas roam free

* 2 blogs this week: Pictures of My (Sorta) Big Chop! AND Turn a Nightmare Product into a Dream* My Albums

Last edited by Korkscrew; 06-11-2013 at 03:20 PM.
http://blackgirllonghair.com/2013/06...al-experiment/

This was basically a social experiment meant to fight the racial stereotypes of African-American hair by allowing strangers to touch 3 volunteers hair. It was considered the modern day Sarah Baartman to many people and basically called a petting zoo.

What do you guys think about it?
I find it weird, especially in the age of the Internet when you can look anything up. I understand the fascination because the hair typically associated with blacks, even curly hair, is usually different than other ethnicities but I see it a little as dehumanizing.

Sent from my HTCEVOV4G using CurlTalk App
Tehliurd likes this.
3b/c, medium-coarse, low porosity, high density
HG: Jessicurl Too Shea and Kinky Curly Curling Custard
Shampoo: nonsulfate shampoo and Suave Naturals sulfate shampoo when needed
Hmm. That is a perspective I never considered. I have many black friends, and have never touched their hair due to the fact that they'd get pretty irritated with me. I think it's also due to social acceptance of what others consider appropriate or not in the sense that I wouldn't want random people coming up and touching me inappropriately, yet I refrain from touching others out of respect.

All in how you look at it I guess. :P
2C, Medium/Fine, Low Porosity, High Density - CG since 5.19.12
Cowash: Burt's Bee's More Moisture Boabab
[B]Conditioner/LI: Nature's Gate Tea Tree Conditioner - I don't RO
Styling Products: KCCC, KY, Deva Arc AnGel, HESMU
Hmm. That is a perspective I never considered. I have many black friends, and have never touched their hair due to the fact that they'd get pretty irritated with me. I think it's also due to social acceptance of what others consider appropriate or not in the sense that I wouldn't want random people coming up and touching me inappropriately, yet I refrain from touching others out of respect.

All in how you look at it I guess. :P
Originally Posted by SweetSquatchii
I think it's inappropriate no matter what the race. I hate people touching my hair without permission and believe me I get it from white, black, and others. Keep in mind a lot of black women have had relaxers as long as they can remember. They typically only see natural hair that is either braided, loced, super short or pressed. But it's not just the relaxed heads who touch. This past weekend a black woman with locs was asking telling me how she liked my hair and the next thing I knew her fingers were in it.

As for this exhibit, it kinds of rubs me wrong like a black people petting zoo or circus freak show. But obviously these models are willing participants so it's their business. I have never felt the urge to touch anyone's hair so I don't understand all this. I do think you should ask yourself how you would feel about an exhibit to "touch white people really bad sunburn skin" so that those of us who have natural pigment protection would like to know what it feels like. Or "touch Asian people's eyes" ect.
If you really want to touch your friends' hair you should just ask them.
curlypearl and SpiralSpunk like this.
"A life without fame can be a good life, but fame without a life is no life at all." - Clive Davis
Black Women Stand on NY Street and Allow Strangers to Touch Their Hair as Part of Social Experiment | Black Girl with Long Hair

This was basically a social experiment meant to fight the racial stereotypes of African-American hair by allowing strangers to touch 3 volunteers hair. It was considered the modern day Sarah Baartman to many people and basically called a petting zoo.

What do you guys think about it?
Originally Posted by BeautyisMiree
Right. The author said:

"But it’s well documented that, for many Americans, segregation is a matter of choice and not circumstance. I fear that a display like this allows some people the opportunity to dip into black culture for an experience before returning to the ‘safety’ of a significantly less diverse world."

For every black person who doesn't want her or his hair touched by someone, there are likely enough who don't mind it, that we shouldn't need some sort of Ripley's Believe It or Not - type affair to exoticize it IMO; for quite a few people to run home and proudly declare, "Guess what I did today, Honey? Why I touched African American hair!" (Not an African, but the hair.) I don't know. Feels like one step from hanging a Ghanian or Native American mask in the house but otherwise remaining oblivious to all or most things African and NA, or actually buying that afro wig and wearing it for Halloween (without black people around) and then throwing it to the back of the closet. (I don't think everyone is like this; especially not most of us, who frankly just seem to be in love with whatever curly hair and how it looks and feels.)

No one is inherently bad for exploring their curiosity and touching black hair, or someone black placing her hair on display. It's just sad to me that there's so much ignorance about what black hair feels like to begin with. People would know what black hair felt like if inter-race relations were stronger and more frequent since the centuries Africans have been an integral and valuable part of the American community.
3b/c?

Ringlet Fandango! ... Where curly ideas roam free

* 2 blogs this week: Pictures of My (Sorta) Big Chop! AND Turn a Nightmare Product into a Dream* My Albums

Last edited by Korkscrew; 06-12-2013 at 03:06 AM.
On the other hand (then I'll shut up LOL) ...

Was just watching some of the vid footage from the "You Can Touch My Hair" event and it really looks interesting. There are women who are opposing the event w/creative signs like, "You can't touch my hair but you can kiss my ass". And then the two groups of ladies talk about their opposing views in a passionate yet respectful way. Good points made on both sides
3b/c?

Ringlet Fandango! ... Where curly ideas roam free

* 2 blogs this week: Pictures of My (Sorta) Big Chop! AND Turn a Nightmare Product into a Dream* My Albums

Last edited by Korkscrew; 06-12-2013 at 04:05 AM.
In all honesty, I thought this was okay and would be even better if they showed more African-American women with different hair types like 3a so those who aren't educated can tell our hair comes in many different types. This really shouldn't be considered a petting zoo because most people are making it seem as one.

My hair has been curly since the day I was born and since I was growing up I've been asked about my hair and if people could touch it. At first I thought it was ignorant but after a while I realized people are just curious since "black" hair isn't represented as "good" hair in the beauty world and the media.
Sounds bizarre to me.
2/c and some 3A. Modified CG.
Protein sensitive
Highly porous. Color over grey.
Best 1st day method: Super Soaker
Conditioners: Curl Junkie Beauticurls Strengthening Conditioner,
Deep condish: Curl Junkie Curl Rehab
Stylers: Experimenting with cones & sulfates while the dews are high.
Sometimes try roller sets - classic glamor but I prefer my curls.
Every day is a gift
My hair has been curly since the day I was born and since I was growing up I've been asked about my hair and if people could touch it. At first I thought it was ignorant but after a while I realized people are just curious since "black" hair isn't represented as "good" hair in the beauty world and the media.
Originally Posted by BeautyisMiree
So if you think people are interested in touching your hair because they want to know what "bad" hair feels like, how does that make you feel as the object of their negative curiosity? ... That they get to go back and tell their non-black friends all about how "bad" hair feels, because of your hair. ... That they didn't trouble themselves asking your name, or care about who you were underneath that "bad" hair.
3b/c?

Ringlet Fandango! ... Where curly ideas roam free

* 2 blogs this week: Pictures of My (Sorta) Big Chop! AND Turn a Nightmare Product into a Dream* My Albums

Last edited by Korkscrew; 06-12-2013 at 12:44 PM.
In all honesty, I thought this was okay and would be even better if they showed more African-American women with different hair types like 3a so those who aren't educated can tell our hair comes in many different types. This really shouldn't be considered a petting zoo because most people are making it seem as one.

My hair has been curly since the day I was born and since I was growing up I've been asked about my hair and if people could touch it. At first I thought it was ignorant but after a while I realized people are just curious since "black" hair isn't represented as "good" hair in the beauty world and the media.
Originally Posted by BeautyisMiree
Other than 4b, most other ethnicities, especially those considered white, have curly and kinky curly hair. I would think a predominantly black person with 3a hair would be more of an exception than a rule.

Maybe I am just jaded and have been the victim of people studying my facial features as if I am an animal too many times to not see this as a freak show. It is one thing to ask one person in private about something racially unique, but another thing entirely to be put on display.

Sent from my HTCEVOV4G using CurlTalk App
curlypearl likes this.
3b/c, medium-coarse, low porosity, high density
HG: Jessicurl Too Shea and Kinky Curly Curling Custard
Shampoo: nonsulfate shampoo and Suave Naturals sulfate shampoo when needed
I am so late with news it's ridiculous

Last edited by Always@night; 06-12-2013 at 04:54 PM.
For every black person who doesn't want her or his hair touched by someone, there are likely enough who don't mind it, that we shouldn't need some sort of Ripley's Believe It or Not - type affair to exoticize it IMO; for quite a few people to run home and proudly declare, "Guess what I did today, Honey? Why I touched African American hair!y.
Originally Posted by Korkscrew
Mom - what did you learn in school today?

Kid - the teacher took us to this exhibit and we got to touch real live black people hair.

Mom - You don't say! It has been a dream of mine to one day get the chance to touch black people hair ever since I saw Florida and Michael singing and dancing on Good Times. And now my son got that chance. Im so proud and happy. This is.. this is.... DYNOMITE!

Lololololol!!!
"A life without fame can be a good life, but fame without a life is no life at all." - Clive Davis
This discussion is very interesting. When I mentioned this to my husband he said "it feels like a Brillo pad right?" I told him no, but there is that misconception that it is rough and hard when its really not. It's an interesting way to show people the truth! I grew up in an diverse area and never thought twice about this , ya some girls had "nappy" hair but that crossed racial lines I knew a red head curly when I was young that had the curliest course Brillo hair I had ever seen. Oooooh she needed conditioner
Katie
2C/3a, Medium Texture, Normal porosity, High Density, Normal Elasticity (so says the LCLF Hair analysis)
Co Wash: As I am
RO: Yes To Carrots / Ion
LI: Biotera / Samy Big Curls Defining Cream
Gel: FSG, Volumax (Original and Mega)
Color: Henna
Tools: Diffusing
In all honesty, I thought this was okay and would be even better if they showed more African-American women with different hair types like 3a so those who aren't educated can tell our hair comes in many different types. This really shouldn't be considered a petting zoo because most people are making it seem as one.

My hair has been curly since the day I was born and since I was growing up I've been asked about my hair and if people could touch it. At first I thought it was ignorant but after a while I realized people are just curious since "black" hair isn't represented as "good" hair in the beauty world and the media.
Originally Posted by BeautyisMiree
Other than 4b, most other ethnicities, especially those considered white, have curly and kinky curly hair. I would think a predominantly black person with 3a hair would be more of an exception than a rule.

Maybe I am just jaded and have been the victim of people studying my facial features as if I am an animal too many times to not see this as a freak show. It is one thing to ask one person in private about something racially unique, but another thing entirely to be put on display.

Sent from my HTCEVOV4G using CurlTalk App
Originally Posted by multicultcurly
Really all these girls did was to educate people on "black" hair and they did it in a very simple, blunt, way.

Wether you like it or not they broke down stereotypes against "black" hair against African-American women and they accomplished that. In my opinion this was an event meant positive for African-American women turned negative by African-American women.
I am a white lily but once in college I got my hair cut way short and all around the bottom it was pretty much a buzz cut. I couldn't believe how many people asked to touch (and some didn't ask). It's pretty unnerving.
In all honesty, I thought this was okay and would be even better if they showed more African-American women with different hair types like 3a so those who aren't educated can tell our hair comes in many different types. This really shouldn't be considered a petting zoo because most people are making it seem as one.

My hair has been curly since the day I was born and since I was growing up I've been asked about my hair and if people could touch it. At first I thought it was ignorant but after a while I realized people are just curious since "black" hair isn't represented as "good" hair in the beauty world and the media.
Originally Posted by BeautyisMiree
Other than 4b, most other ethnicities, especially those considered white, have curly and kinky curly hair. I would think a predominantly black person with 3a hair would be more of an exception than a rule.

Maybe I am just jaded and have been the victim of people studying my facial features as if I am an animal too many times to not see this as a freak show. It is one thing to ask one person in private about something racially unique, but another thing entirely to be put on display.

Sent from my HTCEVOV4G using CurlTalk App
Originally Posted by multicultcurly
Really all these girls did was to educate people on "black" hair and they did it in a very simple, blunt, way.

Wether you like it or not they broke down stereotypes against "black" hair against African-American women and they accomplished that. In my opinion this was an event meant positive for African-American women turned negative by African-American women.
Originally Posted by BeautyisMiree
I understand their good intentions, but I still think it is weird and sad. I don't have to agree with something to understand it.

Sent from my HTCEVOV4G using CurlTalk App
3b/c, medium-coarse, low porosity, high density
HG: Jessicurl Too Shea and Kinky Curly Curling Custard
Shampoo: nonsulfate shampoo and Suave Naturals sulfate shampoo when needed

Trending Topics


Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On



All times are GMT -6. The time now is 01:10 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2011 NaturallyCurly.com