...you're not black.

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I got the same thing except the lady said " you're not white". I was dumb- founded
Originally Posted by Always@night
Aren't you allowed to call her manager?
Originally Posted by BeautyisMiree
I'm sure i could have, but i didn't. I was not in the mood to explain to her everything wrong about the statement she made. Or to talk to the manager. I just happily brought my products and went on with my day.
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I was in Sally Beauty today and a very white girl with curly hair asked to see the relaxers "in the african American section" and I could tell she was a little embarrassed. I wanted to say 1) OMG don't relax your hair!!! and 2) it's really just the curly section. I went to high school with a pale freckled highly fair girl who had curls as tight and kinky as any black hair. And back then in a small city she had NO guidance. She looked like a dandelion most of the time and just despaired. If only we'd known how to coax it!
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You can see my wavy tutorials here: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?lis...ZNxhBHSXAW40OQ and my wavy blog is The Wavy Nation http://wavynation.wordpress.com
I got the same thing except the lady said " you're not white". I was dumb- founded
Originally Posted by Always@night
Damn these sales associates are getting brave these days.

Maybe they need to be trained in the fine art of "The customer is usually right AND know what they want, now get behind the counter, STFU and if they WANT your input, they'll ask you for it."
FroZen
I got the same thing except the lady said " you're not white". I was dumb- founded
Originally Posted by Always@night
Damn these sales associates are getting brave these days.

Maybe they need to be trained in the fine art of "The customer is usually right AND know what they want, now get behind the counter, STFU and if they WANT your input, they'll ask you for it."
Originally Posted by BlackAngelPlayah
Let's be fair tho, clearly customers need to be informed of their ethnicity by unqualified sales assistants, we cannot possibly know it from looking in the mirror, speaking to our relatives and suchlike.

Makes you wonder why the manager would ever employ someone who thinks HAIRcare products are formulated for SKINtone. At best that's sales and marketing not cosmetic science.
curlypearl likes this.
2a-2c, medium texture, porous/ colour treated. Three years CG. Past bra strap length heading for waist.

CO-wash: Inecto coconut/ Elvive Volume Collagen
Treatments: Komaza Care Matani, coconut/ sweet almond/ fractionated coconut oils, Hairveda Sitrinillah
Leave in: Fructis Sleek & Shine (old), Gliss Ultimate Volume, various Elvive
Styler: Umberto Giannini jelly, Au Naturale styling gelee
Flour sack towel, pixie diffuse or air dry.
Experimenting with: benign neglect
I got the same thing except the lady said " you're not white". I was dumb- founded
Originally Posted by Always@night
Damn these sales associates are getting brave these days.

Maybe they need to be trained in the fine art of "The customer is usually right AND know what they want, now get behind the counter, STFU and if they WANT your input, they'll ask you for it."
Originally Posted by BlackAngelPlayah
Let's be fair tho, clearly customers need to be informed of their ethnicity by unqualified sales assistants, we cannot possibly know it from looking in the mirror, speaking to our relatives and suchlike.

Makes you wonder why the manager would ever employ someone who thinks HAIRcare products are formulated for SKINtone. At best that's sales and marketing not cosmetic science.
Originally Posted by Firefox7275
It doesn't matter, if a customer is buying a product a cashier doesn't question their use for it based on ethnicity. It's common sense.
I got the same thing except the lady said " you're not white". I was dumb- founded
Originally Posted by Always@night
Damn these sales associates are getting brave these days.

Maybe they need to be trained in the fine art of "The customer is usually right AND know what they want, now get behind the counter, STFU and if they WANT your input, they'll ask you for it."
Originally Posted by BlackAngelPlayah
Let's be fair tho, clearly customers need to be informed of their ethnicity by unqualified sales assistants, we cannot possibly know it from looking in the mirror, speaking to our relatives and suchlike.

Makes you wonder why the manager would ever employ someone who thinks HAIRcare products are formulated for SKINtone. At best that's sales and marketing not cosmetic science.
Originally Posted by Firefox7275
You know the mirror lies every time. Only you BS cashier knows for sure.
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FroZen
Totally agree the cashier making this thing about ethnicity was uncalled for. That said, I'll take what may be a slightly unpopular stance (forgetting that lady's crappy comment for a sec):

There are some generalities that can be made about certain hair types. For example, most Africans (who aren't very mixed) have very tight curls. It's why certain companies - like "Dark and Lovely" AA hair care products - get a lot of AA customers by targeting that specific racial group, and probably why that lady was so surprised to see someone white buying a product that was likely marketed toward blacks (most of them have black people featured on their boxes).

I've never heard anyone (offline) ever get upset about the validity of the racially-targeted title of these products. I've never heard anyone offline get upset about MOST commercial hair products featuring mostly white, straight-haired women. (Although, inexplicably, I've heard plenty of people get upset about the name of the "Mixed Chicks" product line, even though GENERALLY mixed-race women do tend to have curls in the 3-range.)

Anyway, that woman was rude about it all and I can see why you'd be ticked off.
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Totally agree the cashier making this thing about ethnicity was uncalled for. That said, I'll take what may be a slightly unpopular stance (forgetting that lady's crappy comment for a sec):

There are some generalities that can be made about certain hair types. For example, most Africans (who aren't very mixed) have very tight curls. It's why certain companies - like "Dark and Lovely" AA hair care products - get a lot of AA customers by targeting that specific racial group, and probably why that lady was so surprised to see someone white buying a product that was likely marketed toward blacks (most of them have black people featured on their boxes).

I've never heard anyone (offline) ever get upset about the validity of the racially-targeted title of these products. I've never heard anyone offline get upset about MOST commercial hair products featuring mostly white, straight-haired women. (Although, inexplicably, I've heard plenty of people get upset about the name of the "Mixed Chicks" product line, even though GENERALLY mixed-race women do tend to have curls in the 3-range.)

Anyway, that woman was rude about it all and I can see why you'd be ticked off.
Originally Posted by Korkscrew
I have never seen anyone's picture on an As I Am product label. Just brown packaging. The reason DL has such a large AA following is they deal mostly in relaxers.There are other similar products like Affirm and Motions so references to race in naming products are not necessary so that was a choice MC decided to make. Truth be told the vast majority of African American women I know (offline) chemically straighten their hair so I have no idea what their curl type is. If u can tell the difference between a 3c who relaxes straight and 4a 4b who relaxes straight then u have something that is beyond my expertise. I didn't know what my natural hair looked like until 4 years ago because my mom started chemicals so young and before that she pressed my hair. And I know a lot of AA women (offline) who don't know what their natural texture looks like. Some won't go natural because of it. In my family from the ones I have seen natural we have 3s and 4s but curl size imo is not an all in all indication of what will work in someone's hair. Example mine is tightly curly and fine and has always hated the AA holy grail which is hair grease but I know people with looser hair who swear by it.
I personally equate "generalizations"with stereotypes which I think is keeping a lot of people from healthier hair and trying out new things that maybe works for them. I have heard white people express disgust to other white people who say they dont shampoo their hair every day. And me being told by family members since I wash my hair several times a week I'm acting like a white girl because black people don't wash their hair that often.
I have never seen anyone's picture on an As I Am product label. Just brown packaging. The reason DL has such a large AA following is they deal mostly in relaxers.There are other similar products like Affirm and Motions so references to race in naming products are not necessary so that was a choice MC decided to make.
Originally Posted by adthomas
Even if companies don't put ethnicity on the packaging or in the name, certain skin tones and curl types are splashed all over the websites and Facebook pages and presumably advertising material (I am in the UK so don't see this with US brands). It's also in the wording, talking about 'natural' hair which is rarely a term applied to caucasian curlies, and some companies let it be known they are a 'black owned business'.
As I Am Naturally
Komaza Care - The Complete Hair Solution
https://www.facebook.com/FrizzFreeCurls/photos_stream
https://www.facebook.com/pages/Bee-M...=photos_stream
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2a-2c, medium texture, porous/ colour treated. Three years CG. Past bra strap length heading for waist.

CO-wash: Inecto coconut/ Elvive Volume Collagen
Treatments: Komaza Care Matani, coconut/ sweet almond/ fractionated coconut oils, Hairveda Sitrinillah
Leave in: Fructis Sleek & Shine (old), Gliss Ultimate Volume, various Elvive
Styler: Umberto Giannini jelly, Au Naturale styling gelee
Flour sack towel, pixie diffuse or air dry.
Experimenting with: benign neglect
I have never seen anyone's picture on an As I Am product label. Just brown packaging. The reason DL has such a large AA following is they deal mostly in relaxers.There are other similar products like Affirm and Motions so references to race in naming products are not necessary so that was a choice MC decided to make.
Originally Posted by adthomas
Even if companies don't put ethnicity on the packaging or in the name, certain skin tones and curl types are splashed all over the websites and Facebook pages and presumably advertising material (I am in the UK so don't see this with US brands). It's also in the wording, talking about 'natural' hair which is rarely a term applied to caucasian curlies, and some companies let it be known they are a 'black owned business'.
As I Am Naturally
Komaza Care - The Complete Hair Solution
https://www.facebook.com/FrizzFreeCurls/photos_stream
https://www.facebook.com/pages/Bee-M...=photos_stream
Originally Posted by Firefox7275
I am aware of the ethnic marketing and have often expressed my opinion on it on NC about the topic. I have said I disagree with it. I use what works for my hair. I dont limit myself to the ethnic section.now The backlash that Mixed Chicks got was over the name. Some people took it as if you aren't biracial you can't use this and got mad. The point I was trying to make is that there are many companies that target specific racial groups but don't choose to blatantly reference race in name. It is more like read between the lines. I guess something being suggested rather than bluntly stated makes a difference to some people . As a matter of fact I have read the Curls line was created to be mainly marketed to people who are part black part something else but I haven't seen anyone mad at them . IMO MC made a choice to go that route.
Speaking of the term "natural". When I see natural I think ingredients and not natural hair. For example when that new Pantene natural cowash came out I thought it was going to be like Tresemme Naturals. I was wrong. Since my hair prefers natual ingredients I will be checking labels and not assuming what "natural" is supposed to mean. I think an interesting poll would be asking people what influences them to try a new product. I would have to say for me after ingredients, forums is 1 and yt is 2 and just seeing on shelf and picking it up is 3.
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That was ridiculous. Sorry you had to deal with that. But dumb people exist. I hope you complain about that worker.
I am aware of the ethnic marketing and have often expressed my opinion on it on NC about the topic. I have said I disagree with it. I use what works for my hair. I dont limit myself to the ethnic section.
Originally Posted by adthomas
I respectfully disagree. A generalization can be a simple observance (minus a behavior or set of behaviors) w/out assigning any sort of value or judgement to that observance. For example, what's true is that most people with blond hair do not have afros and most people who are closest to being mono-racially black do not have blond, straight hair. Most mixed b/w people (folks like me) do NOT have blond, straight hair LOL I assign no meaning to any of these truths. It's just factual and there are, of course, exceptions and examples of extreme outliers. No problem until someone comes along and loads those truthful observances w/some sort of culturally political meaning. And I hope you can see that that's not at all what I did.

Stereotyping is most often executed in the context of one or more anticipated negative behaviors of a single person, based on the perceived behavior of a cultural group that supposedly represents that person. And stereotyping is rigid thinking in which no - or close to no -exceptions are acknowledged.

The backlash that Mixed Chicks got was over the name. Some people took it as if you aren't biracial you can't use this and got mad. The point I was trying to make is that there are many companies that target specific racial groups but don't choose to blatantly reference race in name. It is more like read between the lines. I guess something being suggested rather than bluntly stated makes a difference to some people .
Whether the message is subtle or not, the fact that most people don't protest these labels lead back to the same conclusion IMO: there are factual generalizations that can be applied to certain hair. Again though, exceptions must be acknowledged as well, in a full-throated manner: Yes, there are ppl who are mixed b/w but have hair that looks like most Sub-Saharan African hair (I'm gonna go out on a limb and say our Pres. is probably an example) and there are white ppl w/blond afros (far less frequent). Art Garfunkel comes to mind.

I think some of the hoopla over Mixed Chicks was that some ppl don't want to acknowledge that a lot of mixed ppl actually do TEND to have type 3 hair (just like the majority of East Asians and Africans and many Caucasians don't). But then I think some complaints were legit, like the complaints based on those crappy, race-baiting twitters supported and defended by the MIxed Chicks company That happened after I'd received some free samples of their ish that pretty much took my curls and churned them into a silicone-straw fest.

As a matter of fact I have read the Curls line was created to be mainly marketed to people who are part black part something else but I haven't seen anyone mad at them . IMO MC made a choice to go that route.
Sure, I bought some Curls conditioner once at CVS or Target one time. Was slightly more impressed than w/Mixed Chicks Again, I agree w/you that the initial "Mixed Chicks" turnoff was the blatant racial labeling (Again, I find it no more offensive than something like "Dark and Lovely"), whereas the label "Curls" - I think you'll agree - is more neutral.

Speaking of the term "natural". When I see natural I think ingredients and not natural hair. For example when that new Pantene natural cowash came out I thought it was going to be like Tresemme Naturals. I was wrong. Since my hair prefers natual ingredients I will be checking labels and not assuming what "natural" is supposed to mean. I think an interesting poll would be asking people what influences them to try a new product. I would have to say for me after ingredients, forums is 1 and yt is 2 and just seeing on shelf and picking it up is 3.
Oh I totally agree. I've become more of a stickler about what's in things. I'm not quite there, as far as everything being natural, but definitely moving toward it. A while ago I bought some goofy boxed hair dye which had too much developer in it and it nearly demolished my curls. Since then I've been using henna instead, and sure, sure, it's natural, but presents a whole nother set of problem, starting w/the smell, but it is easy on my hair ... Then w/in the past month I overdid it trying to see if I could handle silicones. What a mistake. Anyway, I feel you. You have my number: it's forum and other online research and yt before reading labels and buying
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Last edited by Korkscrew; 06-03-2013 at 04:21 AM. Reason: Edited because I can't stop finding dagnam typos!
I am aware of the ethnic marketing and have often expressed my opinion on it on NC about the topic. I have said I disagree with it. I use what works for my hair. I dont limit myself to the ethnic section.
Originally Posted by adthomas
I respectfully disagree. A generalization can be a simple observance (minus a behavior or set of behaviors) w/out assigning any sort of value or judgement to that observance. For example, what's true is that most people with blond hair do not have afros and most people who are closest to being mono-racially black do not have blond, straight hair. Most mixed b/w people (folks like me) do NOT have blond, straight hair LOL I assign no meaning to any of these truths. It's just factual and there are, of course, exceptions and examples of extreme outliers. No problem until someone comes along and loads those truthful observances w/some sort of culturally political meaning. And I hope you can see that that's not at all what I did.

Stereotyping is most often executed in the context of one or more anticipated negative behaviors of a single person, based on the perceived behavior of a cultural group that supposedly represents that person. And stereotyping is rigid thinking in which no - or close to no -exceptions are acknowledged.

The backlash that Mixed Chicks got was over the name. Some people took it as if you aren't biracial you can't use this and got mad. The point I was trying to make is that there are many companies that target specific racial groups but don't choose to blatantly reference race in name. It is more like read between the lines. I guess something being suggested rather than bluntly stated makes a difference to some people .
Whether the message is subtle or not, the fact that most people don't protest these labels lead back to the same conclusion IMO: there are factual generalizations that can be applied to certain hair. Again though, exceptions must be acknowledged as well, in a full-throated manner: Yes, there are ppl who are mixed b/w but have hair that looks like most Sub-Saharan African hair (I'm gonna go out on a limb and say our Pres. is probably an example) and there are white ppl w/blond afros (far less frequent). Art Garfunkel comes to mind.

I think some of the hoopla over Mixed Chicks was that some ppl don't want to acknowledge that a lot of mixed ppl actually do TEND to have type 3 hair (just like the majority of East Asians and Africans and many Caucasians don't). But then I think some complaints were legit, like the complaints based on those crappy, race-baiting twitters supported and defended by the MIxed Chicks company That happened after I'd received some free samples of their ish that pretty much took my curls and churned them into a silicone-straw fest.

As a matter of fact I have read the Curls line was created to be mainly marketed to people who are part black part something else but I haven't seen anyone mad at them . IMO MC made a choice to go that route.
Sure, I bought some Curls conditioner once at CVS or Target one time. Was slightly more impressed than w/Mixed Chicks Again, I agree w/you that the initial "Mixed Chicks" turnoff was the blatant racial labeling (Again, I find it no more offensive than something like "Dark and Lovely"), whereas the label "Curls" - I think you'll agree - is more neutral.

Speaking of the term "natural". When I see natural I think ingredients and not natural hair. For example when that new Pantene natural cowash came out I thought it was going to be like Tresemme Naturals. I was wrong. Since my hair prefers natual ingredients I will be checking labels and not assuming what "natural" is supposed to mean. I think an interesting poll would be asking people what influences them to try a new product. I would have to say for me after ingredients, forums is 1 and yt is 2 and just seeing on shelf and picking it up is 3.
Oh I totally agree. I've become more of a stickler about what's in things. I'm not quite there, as far as everything being natural, but definitely moving toward it. A while ago I bought some goofy boxed hair dye which had too much developer in it and it nearly demolished my curls. Since then I've been using henna instead, and sure, sure, it's natural, but presents a whole nother set of problem, starting w/the smell, but it is easy on my hair ... Then w/in the past month I overdid it trying to see if I could handle silicones. What a mistake. Anyway, I feel you. You have my number: it's forum and other online research and yt before reading labels and buying
Originally Posted by Korkscrew
I agree with some of your points. I probably should not have used the word stereotype because really I'm only talking in the context of hair and that word carries a lot of baggage. My opinion is that ethnic marketing gives the impression that everyone of x race should use y product because that is what is going to work for them. Therefore it discourages people from exploring products that may work for them because the faces on the ads don't look like them. That is why I gave the example of hair grease. I grew up being told as a black person I therefore should use it on my hair and scalp. Nevermind my hair doesn't like grease because it's too heavy I'm supposed to fit in this box da##it. I actually had a stylist insist on greasing my scalp after I told her not to back when I was relaxed and I had to wash out all the horrible dandruff the next day. Yet I know people who are biracial who love grease. I have read a few posts from white people who like it. And kork, since you are mixed shouldnt this magic potion for biracial people have worked for you since it is afterall called Mixed Chicks? Lol. And why There are some not mixed white and black people who love it.. I'm CG so I dont use it.

. You make a good point about the name DL. I never thought much about it because neither myself or my family used it. Offline I have never heard anythingpositive about DL products. Growing up I heard it was the worst thing u could put in your hair so I never considered buying it until the naturals line. And my hair didn't like it. . I have heard so many offline black people tell me "white" products are bad for your hair and you should not use them. And believe they are rigid in their thinking So they are never going to venture out of the dare I say it Colored section no matter how bad their hair looks. Most of what I use is buy is from grocery and health food but in regular stores I browse EVERYTHING looking for words like moisture and hydrating and the absence of silicones and mineral oil. whether you are a 3 or 4 "generally" your hair is dry and that is how I think products should be marketed. And some lines like Wen and Curl solutions feature models of different races in their ads. I'm glad we have forums to talk about these things instead of depending on what marketing campaigns would have us believe.
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I agree with some of your points. I probably should not have used the word stereotype because really I'm only talking in the context of hair and that word carries a lot of baggage. My opinion is that ethnic marketing gives the impression that everyone of x race should use y product because that is what is going to work for them. Therefore it discourages people from exploring products that may work for them because the faces on the ads don't look like them. That is why I gave the example of hair grease. I grew up being told as a black person I therefore should use it on my hair and scalp. Nevermind my hair doesn't like grease because it's too heavy I'm supposed to fit in this box da##it.
Originally Posted by adthomas
I've suffered similar things - my Afro-Caribbean mom's insistence on pomade, as well as white babysitters brushing my hair while it was in its dry state, etc. - and I believe some of it is based on people not seeing that generalizations merely speak to who generally is meant to benefit from a product or procedure, and foolishly accepting them as cardinal rules instead. It's up to consumers IMO to accept something I thought was fairly obvious: that no one product or approach can satisfy every head of hair, regardless of target audience.

I actually had a stylist insist on greasing my scalp after I told her not to back when I was relaxed and I had to wash out all the horrible dandruff the next day. Yet I know people who are biracial who love grease. I have read a few posts from white people who like it.
I've complained about this before here (probably a little too much because for someone very young it was traumatic): My well-meaning mom, who got stuck having to figure out my hair, took me to get what I later discovered was a Jheri curl. A Jheri curl on top of already long, curly hair and my hair hated it. I don't think it's the fault of labels or generalizations that caused this problem though, but some ppl taking generalizations to an extreme, not allowing for the fact that not everyone's hair/scalp can be treated the same way. There must be versatility to allow for cases that aren't the norm. Most biracials (one black parent / one white) I know or know about don't even try using grease on their scalp. Speaking strictly for myself, I thinks it's fair to assume I'd closely resemble an ailing rat.

And kork, since you are mixed shouldnt this magic potion for biracial people have worked for you since it is afterall called Mixed Chicks? Lol. And why There are some not mixed white and black people who love it.. I'm CG so I dont use it.
Ad T, I have heard a lot of biracial women rave about Mixed Chicks (plus a few who truly hate it). With me, it seems what happened was that I was VERY sensitive to silicones and so it worked at first but after maybe the third round it just locked all moisture out. Therefore, I appear to be an exception to that race-baiting company (couldn't help saying that - they really got under my skin). And yes, there are SOME other people who love it. But some is not most. Again, I have no problem w/them targeting ppl w/ethnic backgrounds that tend to fit the product they've created; my problem is w/their flagrant, vocal, disgusting attitude of racial superiority when it comes to biracial people, which I find every bit as horrendous as the attitude of the Nazis responsible for killing members of my family in WW2.

. You make a good point about the name DL. I never thought much about it because neither myself or my family used it. Offline I have never heard anythingpositive about DL products. Growing up I heard it was the worst thing u could put in your hair so I never considered buying it until the naturals line. And my hair didn't like it. . I have heard so many offline black people tell me "white" products are bad for your hair and you should not use them. And believe they are rigid in their thinking So they are never going to venture out of the dare I say it Colored section no matter how bad their hair looks. Most of what I use is buy is from grocery and health food but in regular stores I browse EVERYTHING looking for words like moisture and hydrating and the absence of silicones and mineral oil. whether you are a 3 or 4 "generally" your hair is dry and that is how I think products should be marketed. And some lines like Wen and Curl solutions feature models of different races in their ads. I'm glad we have forums to talk about these things instead of depending on what marketing campaigns would have us believe.
I almost used a Dark and Lovely relaxer one time, but opted for Bone Strait instead. It, like other relaxers, didn't work. My curl pattern was too strong, I guess. Ended up w/strong waves. Completely agree w/you about product ingredients that work. And I'm on the same page as far as noticing rigid thinking: people should have enough common sense and original thinking to experiment w/all sorts of products. You mentioned some blacks being rigid in this way and I've noticed it with some whites (and whoever else too). To me it's one more example of how some ppl take labeling to extremes, rather than saying that, yeah, these products may be formulated to generally accommodate a certain type of hair, but with exceptions.

I'm glad you brought up types 3 and 4, because you're right: we generally tend to have drier hair because sebum has to fight the curvature of curls, plus (sometimes) gravity itself just to coat the entire hair shaft and keep it moist. And type 3s and 4s, w/such curly hair, do tend to be of "mixed" or African lineage. (And by "mixed" I include curly ppl like Italians, Spaniards, Greeks, Caribbean Islanders ... those w/likely partial or full African ancestry). Meanwhile, let's face it: because sebum easily coats straight hair strands, most hair under type 2c have dramatically oiler hair that actually needs some sort of sulfate-based shampoo, often on a regular basis. Those folks by-and-large are white or Asian. Just a fact. The mantra around these parts is that hair type doesn't matter. I disagree. When it matters, it does matter, but of course we now know there are other considerations as well, when it comes to wavy or curly hair.

All that said: I get the sense that despite some points of departure in discussion, we both have a limited tolerance when it comes to rigid expectations. There are too many exceptions to buy into that. And I'm happy to be sharing a civilized, mature discussion w/a person who can intelligently disagree w/some of my beliefs and still be respectful / classy about it all. It's a breath of fresh air
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Ringlet Fandango! ... Where curly ideas roam free

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This happens to me ALL the time. But I actually get it from the black girls. In Sally's and Target, I've had a couple women approach me. One girl asked if I was lost, so I said, "Nope! I have been found and you guys have been hiding the best hair products!" She laughed and before I knew it, we were sharing hair secrets. The other bad time was when a girl came up to me and asked me what I was looking for. When I told her I was looking for an oil sealing treatment, she got this real confused look on her face and said it looked like I didn't need it. So I said, "Exactly! I just ran out last week and I had to stock up because this **** works!" She took a bit longer to come around but thank goodness I had some pics on my phone of my CG journey and she started giving me product recommendations.

I find the best way to deal with ignorance is ignorant humor. People realize your there for a reason and in return they learn something from the situation without it turning into a giant hissy fit in a retail store.
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2C, Medium/Fine, Low Porosity, High Density - CG since 5.19.12
Cowash: Burt's Bee's More Moisture Boabab
[B]Conditioner/LI: Nature's Gate Tea Tree Conditioner - I don't RO
Styling Products: KCCC, KY, Deva Arc AnGel, HESMU
That's very rude/ type obnoxious. Funny enough, I'm told that a lot because I'm a very light complexion. I am half black, so i find it so amusing when others of MY RACE call me a white girl. So funny.
Korkscrew, you are so right. It is nice to have a quality discussion with someone and both express ourselves and no one get huffy. I have friends who get mad and insulted if I don't agree with their opinions. Im not rude about it. I just say "well, I disagree" and they get po'ed.I have no problem agreeing to disagree with people. I think we are all products of our life experiences which shape our opinions and perceptions. Maybe my experience is different from someone else so why be mad if we dont think about things the same way?

Slightly off topic, forgive me OP, but one "generalization" I see a lot that irks me is that black women unless biracial cannot grow their hair long. Every YT video featuring a black woman with long hair has "are u mixed?" posted 1,000 times. Kimmay refuses to respond. I know I am constantly asked is that all your hair? Yes and I don't understand why it is so hard to believe.
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Meanwhile, let's face it: because sebum easily coats straight hair strands, most hair under type 2c have dramatically oiler hair that actually needs some sort of sulfate-based shampoo, often on a regular basis. Those folks by-and-large are white or Asian. Just a fact. The mantra around these parts is that hair type doesn't matter. I disagree. When it matters, it does matter, but of course we now know there are other considerations as well, when it comes to wavy or curly hair.
Originally Posted by Korkscrew
Why would you debunk one stereotype then lay claim to a fact that is not a fact at all but an erroneous generalisation about other ethnic groups? Most type 1s and 2s or whites and Asians do not need a sulphate shampoo, there are many many many of us successfully using WEN, CO-washing, sulphate free shampoos successfully, you see us not just on NC but on other haircare forums, YouTube etc.

Sulphates can actually cause oilier scalps particularly in those with sensitive or eczematous type skins which is something plenty of 'pale faces' suffer from. Other surfactants can cleanse away excess sebum equally as effectively but without stripping the fatty acids that are within the skin itself. The extra sebum production is more likely if the scalp is assaulted with harsh sulphates daily which *seems* to be more common in caucasians than the black community.

Oftentimes those with looser wave patterns and/ or fine or thin hair prefer shampoo because they appreciate the volume that comes from changing the charge on the hair, or because they are loading up with greasy silicones to make their flat iron ravaged hair appear healthy, or because they are oiling their hair regularly as some immigrant Asian communities do.
2a-2c, medium texture, porous/ colour treated. Three years CG. Past bra strap length heading for waist.

CO-wash: Inecto coconut/ Elvive Volume Collagen
Treatments: Komaza Care Matani, coconut/ sweet almond/ fractionated coconut oils, Hairveda Sitrinillah
Leave in: Fructis Sleek & Shine (old), Gliss Ultimate Volume, various Elvive
Styler: Umberto Giannini jelly, Au Naturale styling gelee
Flour sack towel, pixie diffuse or air dry.
Experimenting with: benign neglect
Sorry you had that experience. I have been buying As I Am products since they first hit the shelves in the closest Sally's (which was probably later than most/small town) for some time now. I love the curling jelly, and leave in. I get my best hair (2nd & 3rd day with it as well). I still have mixed emotions on the coconut co wash. One time it strips my hair, the next it doesn't. Strange. Anyway, I have never had the employee's make a remark like that to me, or heard them say anything like that to someone else. They are just happy to make some sales.

Now I have heard, "You do not have white girl hair", more times than I can count, in salons. It's because of the texture and some other properties. I'll simply say something like yes, that is what I have been told, but keep getting, "No! Seriously! You do not have hair like a white girl". My hair can be whatever it wants, thank you!! After my first visit they move on.
adthomas likes this.
When I hear terms like "hipster" I think, who told cliques they could leave high school??

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