Tell me about being a nurse...(and also my issues...beware)

Well, they say that the elderly don't get the same treatment as younger patients with the same ailments.

My grandma had cancer and got all this blood from the hospital...and after a while she was cancer free. But then, she got leukemia and died a quick nasty death...Was it from all the blood she was given...or from the original cancer? Of course, it isn't like the hospital blood is labeled "blood" and "better blood"...
Originally Posted by slinky1

There are four different types of Leukemia.

acute myeloid leukemia
chronic myeloid leukemia
acute lymphocytic leukemia
chronic lymphocytic leukemia

Leukemia is different from other types of cancer.

"Acute" means that the leukemia develops quickly.

Cancer patients need blood product transfusions to replace components of the blood when there are not enough in the body.

Chemotherapy can effect white blood cells and platelets.
Blood is given depending on blood cell counts. If surgery was done or if the patient is bleeding.
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I don't know what would be worse...the stress and responsibility of nursing, or the stress of not being able to make ends meet for the rest of my life...combined with the stress of doing work that is not even useful...If I'm not doing useful work, or contributing something useful to society, I have absolutely nothing going for me.

That's really it. I have absolutely nothing going for me, and there is an EXCELLENT chance that I never will. Me working in an office for the rest of my life pushing papers, being totally disposable...would make me be a total drain on society, waste of space forever. That's the way I'm going right now. I'm good for nothing.
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So the chemo pill could have given her the leukemia...didn't know that.
Slinky- I did work my first 3 semesters part-time. I went to school full-time. You may be able to still work full-time if you plan on getting your nursing degree slowly and just taking a couple classes at a time.

Just know that it is a lot of work and they expect you to know your stuff for boards when you're finished with school.

Here is a good forum that has helped me.
http://www.allnurses.com/

And I have so many times wished I just had an office job where I "pushed papers" and didn't have to deal with sick kids...the grass is always greener. Don't jump into this just because you're unhappy with your current job. There are tons of jobs out there!!
So, I guess I should consider not working while I go to school...Even if I just do the one or two courses they suggest for night school...

I worked full-time during the day, while going to nursing school full-time at night. I did it in 2 years, summers included. AND, I was a single mom with a 2 year old kid at the time. Frankly, I didn't think it was all that hard, other than the physically exhausting part of doing long hours for an extended period of time. Lots of people work while in nursing school.

There are many opportunities in the nursing field that don't include hospital floor nursing. If you don't feel "quick", you can do something that is slower paced than say ER or surgery.
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Thanks, I'll look there.

The scary part about the schooling is that if you foul up that one part, they throw you out of the program...and you can't really get back in.

I know that there are jobs...but like I said, the low pay and lack of security gets me. I'm afraid to move away and leave loved ones, so that limits my choices.
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So, I guess I should consider not working while I go to school...Even if I just do the one or two courses they suggest for night school...

I worked full-time during the day, while going to nursing school full-time at night. I did it in 2 years, summers included. AND, I was a single mom with a 2 year old kid at the time. Frankly, I didn't think it was all that hard, other than the physically exhausting part of doing long hours for an extended period of time. Lots of people work while in nursing school.

There are many opportunities in the nursing field that don't include hospital floor nursing. If you don't feel "quick", you can do something that is slower paced than say ER or surgery.
Originally Posted by RedCatWaves
You must be one tough cookie!

All of you, really. I get that this isn't an easy profession.

Someone said benes weren't that good. I know that I'll have to finance my retirement pretty much on my own, so that's a no-brainer, but what about sick time and vacation time? Is it comparable to the corporate world?
You must be one tough cookie!

Not really. I was just a mother and had to support myself and my child. I didn't have the luxury of not working, so I worked, and tried to better myself at the same time. It was hard on my son though, for those 2 years, because I only saw him from 4pm-6pm on weekdays. He was with babysitters the rest of the time. I had hospital clinicals on Saturdays, so I really only had 1 day off a week. I just tried to keep my goal in mind and got through it the best I could. I hardly ever studied...I didn't have time. I had to learn it all during class. I'm lucky that I'm a quick learner and good tester.
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You must be one tough cookie!
I hardly ever studied...I didn't have time.
Originally Posted by RedCatWaves
Uh oh! Like a lot of people, I hardly studied my whole life...but I think I would have to study for this stuff.
Lots of nursing schools have really long wait lists, around here anyway. I think if you're really interested you should look into it and maybe apply/ put your name on the list. You could talk to the Dean of that dept. and ask him/her your questions to see if it's the right fit.

I'll be done with my BSN in the spring. It really is a lot of work but I know people who are working, have kids and are in the program, so it can be done. Two girls last year had babies and were back to school within days of the birth!

You mentioned about messing up and being kicked out of school. You'll have an instructor with you who will answer your questions (hopefully, if they're nice) while you're in school. I don't think the fear of getting kicked out should be an issue holding you back. Sure, it can happen, but if you pay attention, ask questions, and do what's expected of you in class and in clinical, your chances of getting "kicked out" are low.

Also, the primary role of a nurse is not to wipe butt! (I hope that's not what i'm going to school for, anyway.)
You mentioned about messing up and being kicked out of school. You'll have an instructor with you who will answer your questions (hopefully, if they're nice) while you're in school. I don't think the fear of getting kicked out should be an issue holding you back. Sure, it can happen, but if you pay attention, ask questions, and do what's expected of you in class and in clinical, your chances of getting "kicked out" are low.
Originally Posted by ~Zoe~
that's what i keep telling my students.. from the first day i've told them to ask me questions, ask me all the questions they want.. we have finals next week so they have been very stressed lately.. yes there is a chance some of them may fail, but i've been encouraging them all semester..

you can look up the school nclex (nursing boards) pass rate, that should be located on your state board of nursing website.. the university i graduated from had an extremely high pass rate when i was there; however, very few of us did get through the program without failing a class.. often if you fail a class you an wait a year (or semester depending on the program) to get back into the class and have a 2nd chance..

i ditto checking the allnurses.com forums.. i used to spend some time over there years ago when i was finishing up my bsn and right after graduation..

one of my best friends from my former workplace has her bs in sociology and went back for a ADN (associate degree nurse = RN)..

many schools have post-bac to bsn programs.. you may want to check in your area for a program like that.. it may be more worthwhile for you.. allnursingschools.com is a good site to find schools which provide the degree you are interested in, you can search by degree and/or location..
Ah, it all makes sense now. Goldy is the puppet master!
Originally Posted by Poodlehead
I think nursing is a wonderful profession, and I admire the people who become nurses - it's a tough job, and one I would certainly not be able to do. Also, I think people on here have given you some good answers about being a nurse and things to thing about... What I am concerned about is that I am getting the impression that the primary motivator to get into nursing is that you think you are unattractive and you think that looks don't matter in the nursing field? I don't really think that is a valid way to choose a profession.

Have you ever seen any sort of therapist? Maybe discussing these issues with someone else will help you to feel better about yourself - the way you feel about your appearance seems to be controlling your life, and you don't have to feel that way, you shouldn't have to feel that way.
I haven't got the slightest idea how to change people, but I still keep a long list of prospective candidates just in case I should ever figure it out.
I'm working part time while attending school full-time. It's hectic but if you are an organized, motivated person, it can be done. I'm not going to school to clean poo either, I want to work with transplant patients and eventually enter a MSN and ND programs.

Most nursing schools require you to take a certain number of required courses before you can even apply to nursing programs. These are generally classes like a two semester sequence of Anatomy & Physiology, Chemistry and / or Organic Chem, Psychology, English, some kind of statistics or math for medical dosages. Definitely look into the requirements and get started on them early. Most CC programs are incredibly competitive because they are so cheap - lots of career switchers and second degree students. The GPA cut off in my program was 3.8 last year, just to give you an idea. Sometimes the waiting lists can be very long.

As an aside, I don't understand why you are so fixated on looks, but that's likely your perception more than anyone elses. Really. There are attractive and less attractive people in all fields, at all levels of success. Looks don't guarantee you anything. You have a lot more control over your own destiny than you think.
3A / 2B / 2C wavicelli



A, I think you could do the nursing thing. You have a lot of determination. I just wish we could convince you how wonderful you truly are.

My mom is an RN and has been for the past 22 years. She's done everything: ER, OBGYN (which was her absolute favorite), Home Health, Dept. of Health, and now she teaches nursing at a local college. She fell into nursing accidentally because after the divorce, her parents told her she could live with them and they'd take care of my sister and me while she went to school, but she HAD to go to school. So she chose nursing because it was a two year associates program back then. (Not sure if that's still the case for an RN today).

Slinks, seriously. You could do it.

I heart you.
You are an evil biatch, evil. Your life must suck!
Originally Posted by snowflakes821
http://booyahlicious.blogspot.com/
If you want to be a nurse, I'd say go for the RN--there is much higher demand for them and you'll make a lot more money and have a lot more respect in your job. Yes, you'll have to go to school for a longer time, but think of it as an investment in your future.

I'm not a nurse but I work with them in my doula job. A lot of the information you want depends specifically on what area you want to go into. I only work with labor and delivery nurses so I can tell you some specifics about what they do. Most of them seem to love their job and love taking care of their patients. They get a lot of respect. In a lot of ways, it is the RN who is in control in the patient's room, even when the doctor is there.

But yes, as a nurse, you will work long hours and you will have to deal with heartbreaking situations and you will be responsible for other people's lives. You asked about medical mistakes--of course they happen. Tens of thousands of people die every year from them. But you do have control over how many mistakes you make in healthcare, just as in any other area of life. Simple things like double checking the medication and dosage, double checking the patient's identity, etc. can dramatically reduce the number of medical mistakes.

Oh I wanted to add that looks have nothing to do with nursing. Seriously, get that idea out of your head. A patient who is sick or suffering doesn't care what you look like--they care about the quality of healthcare they are receiving. They want a nurse who will take care of them, who will treat them with respect and respond to their requests and answer their questions.

The idea that a nurse should be pretty should have been left behind in the 1950s.

I too am tired of pushing paper and want to do something meaningful. I am in the process of taking the prequisites to get into nursing school. Untill then I have to push paper..Please..looks have nothing to do with being a nurse...no matter how obsessed society is with looks. it all comes from inside and have the desire to do something meaningful and rewarding. That is my two cents.
I think nursing is a wonderful profession, and I admire the people who become nurses - it's a tough job, and one I would certainly not be able to do. Also, I think people on here have given you some good answers about being a nurse and things to thing about... What I am concerned about is that I am getting the impression that the primary motivator to get into nursing is that you think you are unattractive and you think that looks don't matter in the nursing field? I don't really think that is a valid way to choose a profession.

Have you ever seen any sort of therapist? Maybe discussing these issues with someone else will help you to feel better about yourself - the way you feel about your appearance seems to be controlling your life, and you don't have to feel that way, you shouldn't have to feel that way.
Originally Posted by rileyb
I highly agree with Riley. Nobody should feel the way you talk about yourself.

A, I think you could do the nursing thing. You have a lot of determination. I just wish we could convince you how wonderful you truly are.
Originally Posted by Little Miss Snarky Booyah
Absolutely. Go for it, but a change in jobs will not stop the self-depreciating thoughts. You are worth getting some help. Please take care of yourself.
I think having a successful career life has much less to do with looks than you think. Looks do not guarantee happiness and success in a career, or in other aspects of your life. When I tell anyone about my struggles to find and more importantly, keep a decent job, and about my unhappiness with life in general, they can't understand. I'm told, even by my doctor, that I'm so bright and attractive - things can't possibly be that hard for me. It's not about looks or even intelligence. Having confidence and emotional stability make all the difference in the career world, and those are two things I don't have.

It sounds to me like nursing is a lot like paralegalism - they both look like easy careers from the outside, but they're very stressful and challenging. You deal with clients/patients that have a lot of problems, paralegals and nurses have the same status in their respective environments, and doctors and lawyers are both notoriously tough to work for. I thought paralegals were glorified secys that get paid to make coffee and answer a few calls. Wrong. Law offices are hectic environments, and lawyers expect you to do almost everything for them. They're disorganized, tense, and bad lawyers (I've worked for good and bad ones) blame you when they screw up. Clients also blame you and vent to you when the lawyer screws up. I have a few old friends that went into nursing who say similar things about their field - it's a lot of hours and a lot of crap. I don't think either are fields to get into unless you're very emotionally strong and have a real love for the work. You have to put on a happy face and fake politeness when you really want to scream in exasperation. It sounds like you need to get strong and face your issues before doing something major like switching career fields. Just from reading some of your posts, nursing doesn't sound like a good fit for you. If you don't think you'll move ahead in the business world, then you won't. I doubt it's about your looks - it's more about your confidence and commitment. You say that being a paper pusher doesn't make you feel like you're doing anything worthwhile. Would having a higher-status business job really change those feelings? I think it's less about the job and more about you. I'm trying to make my life less about my career, when it's historically been all about my career. I've been taking some time to try and figure out why exactly I'm so unhappy and disatisfied, and to decide what will make me happy. It may be that doing nothing will make me happy, but then I'll either have to find a sugar daddy to support that or get pregnant and go on welfare. Either sounds better than nursing or paralegalism, IMO!
I think having a successful career life has much less to do with looks than you think. Looks do not guarantee happiness and success in a career, or in other aspects of your life. When I tell anyone about my struggles to find and more importantly, keep a decent job, and about my unhappiness with life in general, they can't understand. I'm told, even by my doctor, that I'm so bright and attractive - things can't possibly be that hard for me. It's not about looks or even intelligence. Having confidence and emotional stability make all the difference in the career world, and those are two things I don't have.
Originally Posted by Kenzie_06
I agree with this. In addition, I don't think ugly nurses have it any easier than ugly office workers, personally. I also don't believe that you are ugly, so it's really a moot point. In fact, I would think that having confidence is even more important in nursing than it is in other jobs, since other people's lives are in your hands. I don't care if my nurse is pretty, but I sure as heck care if she is confident: in her abilities and herself. If you can't pull it together on that level, then maybe you should try another profession.
"I don't know! I don't know why I did it, I don't know why I enjoyed it, and I don't know why I'll do it again!" -BART SIMPSON

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