"I'm Biracial, Not Black" - controversial film

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What's going on here? Heeeeey everyone, hey!!!
Originally Posted by helloyellowbird
ROFL.. I'm ranting about that other part of that ridiculous dumb ass documentary that's reaaaaaaaaaally showing some people true colors (pun intended).
I actually find it most telling the level of aggressiveness with which these comments on this board are written. I understand the statement made by one person in the clip who stated that "mixed" people should have their own race. Maybe a lot of people on this forum can't own up to their own privilege of identifying as mono-racial and not having to deal with the idea of walking in two worlds. I'm sure some of the people in this video have faced discrimination and prejudice due to their racial identity and I think we should take a good look at ourselves and the role we play in that. We all have internalized some of the negative stereotypes of our own racial group(s), ask any culturally competent mental health professional for assurance if you need it.

My question is, why are so many of us so turned off to people of African ancestry claiming their biracial identities? Instead of focusing on their experiences as their experiences we want to label them as self-loathing Black people who don't want to own their "Blackness". For some biracial people this is true, but that is not unlike people who claim a Black racial identity either.

Why do we continue to hold on to the one drop rule (not originally created/enforced by Black people mind you) that is completely inaccurate? If you really want to find the answer to why the people in this video seem "confused" or "ignorant" to some of you then I would suggest that you take some time to explore your own racial identity and ask yourself, "why do I feel uncomfortable by what this other person is saying about their OWN identity?" No one can make you feel any sort of way. You feel how you feel.

I say this because the amount of projections on this topic are rampant. Instead of hearing what these people said in the clip, many of the people who have commented here have chosen to "hear" what they wanted to hear. For instance, belittling a child who says she doesn't want "ghetto to define Black" instead of recognizing her keen observance (as a child mind you) that the majority of Americans feel Black=ghetto. Just like there are stereotypes of every racial group, there are stereotypes about biracial people: that they're confused, whitewashed, ignorant, isolated, emotionally crippled. A stereotype that the clip (seems to) perpetuate is the idea that all biracial people are of a medium skin tone. Another one is that biracial people are Black + White.

Also, why would it be so controversial to want to create a "new race" of "biracial" when these people seem to be talking about not being fully accepted into the races of their parents? Don't we all want to feel accepted, safe and at home with people who are like ourselves?
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I have not read every comment in this thread but what I also found interesting about this clip and in general is to hear biracial talk about themselves as "half". I just wanted to say for the record (to biracial people) don't let anyone ever tell you that you're "half" anything, you are as whole and complete as they come.
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What's going on here? Heeeeey everyone, hey!!!
Originally Posted by helloyellowbird
ROFL.. I'm ranting about that other part of that ridiculous dumb ass documentary that's reaaaaaaaaaally showing some people true colors (pun intended).
Originally Posted by Marah Mizrahi
I need some spark notes for this thread.
I swore we just did this but whatever. I just want to say that there is only 1 race among people: human. So unless you are like half goat or something you are not bi-racial.

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I'm just catching up and reading the thread I agree with a lot. Will jump in when I can.

Anyway, I'm still a little disturbed by this documentary. Has anybody seen this part?
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RBHnt...eature=related
Seriously? I'm so happy they disabled the comments because I would have said something very very rude.
Originally Posted by Xyz
Nevermind... just nevermind. I wrote rant but erased it cause it was to damn deep and I don't want to start any ****.

Look..that tape was ridiculous. And I'm glad they disabled the comments too because I would have gotten banned from YT for life.


*Sigh* The person who is responsible for that documentary needs to slap the **** out of themselves..seriously.
Originally Posted by Marah Mizrahi
I'mma slap Xyz for that post, Xyz bring your cheek here.....lol

But that was just too much just WOW over the top insanity. There is so much I wanna say but WOW my brain is on overload, I cant even process it to type it.. this sht was so mind boggling lol

She is a sad sick person. I just can't...

has anyone seen her website LMAO now you know she is off her rocker, is that beyonce like monster suppose to be her why is it all extra thin and light and why are all her drawings/photos younger and thinner looking than her..she has some major self-acceptance issues.




This is how she looks.... yet.. just nothing smh...

Oh, just so you know: if you're light skinned you're more likely to get raped. I saw it on the Internets.




OMG. That second clip was horrible.

"In the depth of winter, I finally learned that within me there lay an invincible summer."

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ROFL @ Curly.

Carolyn Battle Cochrane is a trip and a half. I was like.. lady please.. most people would look at you and just think you were just light skinned black person, she has african features .. oh but I forgot she's not the "light skinned black girl"..she's "the biracial girl"... I had to DIE at all that damn agreeing her and that other lady were doing.

I was like please get the eff over yourselves.. all this cause some black folks done called them "the light skinned girl". Um they are light skinned black people.

I wish you would have seen my rant.. hee hee! I was hot! And then people wonder why certain black folks are on guard about certain ****... take a wild effin guess.
Wooooooww. I don't have anything to add right now cause my brain is on overload from reading the posts and Marah steals my thoughts anyway, but CURLY - .
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ChewyCaramello62...

I couldn't agree more! Thanks for saying this.

I am a self-identified biracial person. My mother is also biracial (black and white), from the Caribbean. My father was white. Therefore I am not only black. I'm both. It is what it is.

However, this doesn't mean that I don't appreciate the struggles and pain of my African ancestors. Nor does it mean that I hate my "black" side. Black is truly beautiful to me.

But here's the deal...I look pretty white, which often creates confusion in people. I've lived my whole life never quite feeling accepted by anyone. If my skin were a little bit darker, maybe like a caramel color, then I would probably be more accepted.

I'm not trying to be all "tragic mulatto" up in here. All I'm saying is that I've experienced a lot of painful rejection and mistreatment in my life because I don't look/sound/act the way people believe I should.

When I was younger, I sometimes referred to myself as black when asked that famous question: "what are you"? And people would either laugh at me or look utterly confused when I would say that. Looking at me it's pretty obvious why they would react that way, as ignorant as it might be.

Chewy, you're right...the one-drop rule was created by whites. It doesn't hold water in 2010. It continues to promote division among people of all colors. Maybe it provided people with a sense of unity at one time, but to me it seems really divisive.

And if a person refers to himself/herself as biracial, it isn't meant to be offensive. It is simply a term that some people (like me) use to describe ourselves in a way that feels comfortable. I view it as a descriptive term, nothing more. I don't call myself that because I'm ashamed of my black heritage. Identity is a VERY personal thing. No one has the right to define somebody else's reality.

But honestly...I prefer to be defined by my character, not my race or ethnicity. I know it sounds idealistic but I wish we could all simply be human without all this bullsh*t, know what I mean?

Unfortunately, the historical trauma of racism has everyone screwed.
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And if a person refers to himself/herself as biracial, it isn't meant to be offensive. It is simply a term that some people (like me) use to describe ourselves in a way that feels comfortable. I view it as a descriptive term, nothing more. I don't call myself that because I'm ashamed of my black heritage. Identity is a VERY personal thing. No one has the right to define somebody else's reality.
Originally Posted by curlyhoneyb
I didn't read the whole thread b/c I wanna keep posting here But all of this. How can you be offended by the way another person IDs racially in terms of biracial vs black? I could see if someone who had white skin and no African ancestry (as far as they knew) and suddenly wanted to ID as black. That would make sense b/c they haven't been socialized as a black person and they don't have the ancestry or social experience that many black IDed ppl share. That's fair. But to be offended b/c a biracial person IDs as biracial? Ya lost me there. Separately, if they have a problem with their own blackness, that's their issue- not yours
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ChewyCaramello62...

I couldn't agree more! Thanks for saying this.

I am a self-identified biracial person. My mother is also biracial (black and white), from the Caribbean. My father was white. Therefore I am not only black. I'm both. It is what it is.

However, this doesn't mean that I don't appreciate the struggles and pain of my African ancestors. Nor does it mean that I hate my "black" side. Black is truly beautiful to me.

But here's the deal...I look pretty white, which often creates confusion in people. I've lived my whole life never quite feeling accepted by anyone. If my skin were a little bit darker, maybe like a caramel color, then I would probably be more accepted.

I'm not trying to be all "tragic mulatto" up in here. All I'm saying is that I've experienced a lot of painful rejection and mistreatment in my life because I don't look/sound/act the way people believe I should.

When I was younger, I sometimes referred to myself as black when asked that famous question: "what are you"? And people would either laugh at me or look utterly confused when I would say that. Looking at me it's pretty obvious why they would react that way, as ignorant as it might be.

Chewy, you're right...the one-drop rule was created by whites. It doesn't hold water in 2010. It continues to promote division among people of all colors. Maybe it provided people with a sense of unity at one time, but to me it seems really divisive.

And if a person refers to himself/herself as biracial, it isn't meant to be offensive. It is simply a term that some people (like me) use to describe ourselves in a way that feels comfortable. I view it as a descriptive term, nothing more. I don't call myself that because I'm ashamed of my black heritage. Identity is a VERY personal thing. No one has the right to define somebody else's reality.

But honestly...I prefer to be defined by my character, not my race or ethnicity. I know it sounds idealistic but I wish we could all simply be human without all this bullsh*t, know what I mean?

Unfortunately, the historical trauma of racism has everyone screwed.
Originally Posted by curlyhoneyb
NOW this ALL makes complete sense to me and I feel it was well written. None of this is what I take issue with.. I take issue with certain biracial people acting like all other black people have some big issue with them simply BECAUSE they are biracial, when they want to shy away from their blackness and it's blatently obvious, or they pretend "biracial" is some special race or needs to be made it's own race because they don't want to be associated with black people.

And of course..playing the whole tragic mulatto thing to the umpteenth degree needlessly and totally unwarranted. And I feel like that is Catherine Cochrane's m.o.

I'm mixed and I've never played that card and it irks me when other biracial or multiracial people do just as much as it irks me when certain black people automatically make assumptions about an individual simply because a person is biracial and try to exclude them or put them down.

Frankly, in my experience with many black people it's all about how you present yourself whether you are "accepted" or not. Sure there are some that make those ridiculous assumptions about your character without any info based solely on your racial makeup but I find that to be the exception, not the rule. And it bugs me when people pretend like it is the rule with black people.
I feel you, Marah. ITA with what you're saying.

I believe that there are misunderstandings on both sides.

I think that for some black people, they have had bad experiences with biracial people and the same is true the other way around.

So basically, no one wins because of misconceptions that each side holds about the other.

I'll be honest...I've always been a bit uncomfortable around some black women, specifically the ones who tend to immediately assume things about me because of the way I look and treat me accordingly. I'm also painfully shy and that sometimes leads to further assumptions/ misunderstandings about me being aloof, *****y, having a superiority complex, etc.

Sometimes I've been deeply hurt by some female calling me a ***** or being cruel just because of my skin color...not because I did anything to deserve it. I've had some pretty painful experiences where I wanted more than anything to be loved and accepted by other black people, not treated like I was "special", but simply accepted for who I was.

Of course, I've also known some lovely black women who didn't judge me and actually gave me a chance...my skin color wasn't a problem because they were secure and confident about their own unique beauty. They didn't care if I was black, white, blue, or purple with pink polka dots. They weren't trying to belittle me or make me feel ashamed of who I was. And I would never make anyone else feel ashamed of who she is.

And you're perfectly right...some biracial women do contribute to the obnoxious stereotypes. But I do believe that those types are actually in the minority. At least I haven't encountered too many. I'm sure that other ladies have had different experiences. I don't care for ANYONE with the attitude that they are better than others, so I wouldn't associate with people who act like that anyway.

You made some really valid points. The non-hair discussions can be pretty deep, huh?
I feel you, Marah. ITA with what you're saying.

I believe that there are misunderstandings on both sides.

I think that for some black people, they have had bad experiences with biracial people and the same is true the other way around.

So basically, no one wins because of misconceptions that each side holds about the other.

I'll be honest...I've always been a bit uncomfortable around some black women, specifically the ones who tend to immediately assume things about me because of the way I look and treat me accordingly. I'm also painfully shy and that sometimes leads to further assumptions/ misunderstandings about me being aloof, *****y, having a superiority complex, etc.

Sometimes I've been deeply hurt by some female calling me a ***** or being cruel just because of my skin color...not because I did anything to deserve it. I've had some pretty painful experiences where I wanted more than anything to be loved and accepted by other black people, not treated like I was "special", but simply accepted for who I was.

Of course, I've also known some lovely black women who didn't judge me and actually gave me a chance...my skin color wasn't a problem because they were secure and confident about their own unique beauty. They didn't care if I was black, white, blue, or purple with pink polka dots. They weren't trying to belittle me or make me feel ashamed of who I was. And I would never make anyone else feel ashamed of who she is.

And you're perfectly right...some biracial women do contribute to the obnoxious stereotypes. But I do believe that those types are actually in the minority. At least I haven't encountered too many. I'm sure that other ladies have had different experiences. I don't care for ANYONE with the attitude that they are better than others, so I wouldn't associate with people who act like that anyway.

You made some really valid points. The non-hair discussions can be pretty deep, huh?
Originally Posted by curlyhoneyb
Get out of my head, girl! This is the 3rd post I've read of yours today that I could have written myself! I would love to swap stories with you sometime. I'll bet we could practically finish each other's sentences.

ETA: The 2nd to the last line in my sig was inspired by past conversations with others on this very topic.

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Last edited by ~Ghost Poster~; 11-17-2010 at 06:40 PM.
I feel you, Marah. ITA with what you're saying.

I believe that there are misunderstandings on both sides.

I think that for some black people, they have had bad experiences with biracial people and the same is true the other way around.

So basically, no one wins because of misconceptions that each side holds about the other.

I'll be honest...I've always been a bit uncomfortable around some black women, specifically the ones who tend to immediately assume things about me because of the way I look and treat me accordingly. I'm also painfully shy and that sometimes leads to further assumptions/ misunderstandings about me being aloof, *****y, having a superiority complex, etc.

Sometimes I've been deeply hurt by some female calling me a ***** or being cruel just because of my skin color...not because I did anything to deserve it. I've had some pretty painful experiences where I wanted more than anything to be loved and accepted by other black people, not treated like I was "special", but simply accepted for who I was.

Of course, I've also known some lovely black women who didn't judge me and actually gave me a chance...my skin color wasn't a problem because they were secure and confident about their own unique beauty. They didn't care if I was black, white, blue, or purple with pink polka dots. They weren't trying to belittle me or make me feel ashamed of who I was. And I would never make anyone else feel ashamed of who she is.

And you're perfectly right...some biracial women do contribute to the obnoxious stereotypes. But I do believe that those types are actually in the minority. At least I haven't encountered too many. I'm sure that other ladies have had different experiences. I don't care for ANYONE with the attitude that they are better than others, so I wouldn't associate with people who act like that anyway.

You made some really valid points. The non-hair discussions can be pretty deep, huh?
Originally Posted by curlyhoneyb

Another good post! You are just on a roll!

I think a lot of it has to do with experience and perspective. I honestly do think a lot of people tend to judge a group based on a few experiences they've had.. and it's skewed their perspective. Sort of like certain white people thinking all black people listen to rap. LOL!

I'm just not for all the blaming everyone and acting like a victim. I'm big on PERSONAL responsibility. I've had a mixed bag of experience as a mixed race person but mostly positivity from most folks..and definitely black people. Of course I've gotten the "Oh she think she special or cute cause she mixed" or "Oh she got good hair" comments.

But overall I have to say black people really have been pretty decent to me that ACTUALLY get to know me. But yeah.. I've gotten the "look" and the "eyeroll" from certain black women if my view is not consistent with what they feel a black person's view SHOULD be. But like I said..that's not the rule in my experience..it's the exception and I can tell those women are usually insecure about who THEY are and it really has nothing to do with me.

I guess I feel pretty comfortable with black people cause I hung out with my cousins on my mom's side a lot and their dad was black and they indentified as "just black". They lived in a very affluent neighborhood but we'd ride bikes to the "other" hoods where it wasn't so affluent and I tell you a lot of the black people were so nice to me and they didn't seem to care that I was mixed at all. They would say they like how I'm not all stuck up like a lot of mixed girls and play in my hair. Go figure.

So I never felt the extremes of awkwardness or lack of acceptance from black folks in general. And I think it helps that I'm not Mariah Carey light skin. I'm a caramel color. Most black people tell me the give away is my hair. LOL! They say, "I KNOW you got something in you..cause you ain't all black with that hair!" LOL! And well I've always been into rock music and I would get the "why do you listen to that crap" comments. LOL!

With my experience of being around other biracial people (particularly women not the men so much) I noticed a lot of either stuck up attitude toward black women or pretense that they weren't "of color". Think Spike Lee's School Daze..the wanna be's versus the gigaboos. Even some of my mixed friends acted this way and it irritated me to no end.

So I guess it left a bad taste in my mouth. So again..it's experience and perspective. I just felt like sometimes the tragic mulatto card was way overplayed. It's like okay.. not EVERYONE is having some negative thought about you JUST because you are mixed. Relax.

I guess it's that paranoia that comes with being made to feel outsider or feeling different..and then of course there is that stigma in America of being "black" in the first place. And my goodness when you feel like you have no place to really "fit" in cause you aren't white and then you aren't exactly "black" either. It's obviously not easy. So I do get it and understand. It's just not something that I've experience on a very large scale with blacks. But in America there is this serious problem with race period.. especially for people of color. It's not easy being someone of color here. Probably not anywhere really. Look at the issues in places like the Dominican Republic or Brazil.

And yeah there are deep discussion over here but there are deep ones in the 4a section too.
I find your attitude refreshing, Marah...so down to earth!

You're really lucky to have had mostly positive experiences. Wish I could say the same. See, unlike you, I'm very fair...not caramel. I believe some people look at my skin and think "bougie", snobby, whatever.

And it hurts because some people will be openly nasty about it. I agree...it also depends on what you look like. I find that mixed women with darker complexions are often more accepted. So us girls with Mariah Carey's complexion or lighter often have to deal with stuff like this, being judged harshly on the spot by men AND women. Can I ask you a question (hope it isn't too personal)? Where did you grow up? That sounds like fun!

If you knew some mixed girls who acted snobby...chances are, they probably adopted that attitude in response to perceived rejection/hostility from black folks. I don't think it's right, but I understand where they're coming from. I'm not sure if that makes sense?

Speaking from personal experience, rejection and outright cruelty from black people can be every bit as damaging as racism from white people. So when you do see a mixed girl/woman who IS stuck-up and snotty, she might be hiding a lot of pain beneath all that attitude.

Some people become bitter because of their experiences and they feel that they can't win no matter what, so they simply don't trust anyone who looks like the person that tormented them or mistreated them.

You said that people would tell you that they liked you because you weren't stuck-up like a lot of mixed girls. Maybe I'm weird, but that sounds like a backhanded compliment to me. I was on a plane a few years ago sitting beside this teenager and her mother. I was talking with them, just friendly conversation, and the girl says: "You're really nice. People with your color aren't usually nice". And I'm like, WTF? Did she really go there with me? I continued to be nice of course, but I felt so awkward after that comment. Like, why make it about color or my physical appearance? It was obvious that she had no manners because she actually put her hands in my hair and made a comment about me needing to "fix" it. But she was rocking this long straight weave.

That's just my perspective, though. I appreciate your insight, especially with this statement: "It's not easy being someone of color here". THIS. You can say that again!

That is real talk. And the thing is, I live in white skin, but I'm a person of color too...most people don't realize that except for the ones who notice my hair on any given day.

Marah, I do envy you. I've always felt this sense of alienation. I wish it didn't have to be like this.

You're really lucky to have had mostly positive experiences. Wish I could say the same. See, unlike you, I'm very fair...not caramel. I believe some people look at my skin and think "bougie", snobby, whatever.

And it hurts because some people will be openly nasty about it. I agree...it also depends on what you look like. I find that mixed women with darker complexions are often more accepted. So us girls with Mariah Carey's complexion or lighter often have to deal with stuff like this, being judged harshly on the spot by men AND women. Can I ask you a question (hope it isn't too personal)? Where did you grow up? That sounds like fun!

If you knew some mixed girls who acted snobby...chances are, they probably adopted that attitude in response to perceived rejection/hostility from black folks. I don't think it's right, but I understand where they're coming from. I'm not sure if that makes sense?

Speaking from personal experience, rejection and outright cruelty from black people can be every bit as damaging as racism from white people. So when you do see a mixed girl/woman who IS stuck-up and snotty, she might be hiding a lot of pain beneath all that attitude.

Some people become bitter because of their experiences and they feel that they can't win no matter what, so they simply don't trust anyone who looks like the person that tormented them or mistreated them.

You said that people would tell you that they liked you because you weren't stuck-up like a lot of mixed girls. Maybe I'm weird, but that sounds like a backhanded compliment to me. I was on a plane a few years ago sitting beside this teenager and her mother. I was talking with them, just friendly conversation, and the girl says: "You're really nice. People with your color aren't usually nice". And I'm like, WTF? Did she really go there with me? I continued to be nice of course, but I felt so awkward after that comment. Like, why make it about color or my physical appearance? It was obvious that she had no manners because she actually put her hands in my hair and made a comment about me needing to "fix" it. But she was rocking this long straight weave.

That's just my perspective, though. I appreciate your insight, especially with this statement: "It's not easy being someone of color here". THIS. You can say that again!

That is real talk. And the thing is, I live in white skin, but I'm a person of color too...most people don't realize that except for the ones who notice my hair on any given day.

Marah, I do envy you. I've always felt this sense of alienation. I wish it didn't have to be like this.
Originally Posted by curlyhoneyb
CHB, can I ask you how old you are--or could you at least give a range, or you can just PM me? I'm again stunned because it's like I am writing these posts myself--every word above. I've never known someone else to express it so precisely and so completely. When I was growing up, until I was 18, I was the only person I knew like me. It was a very lonely, isolated existence. Then, the person I met at age 18 who was kind of like me, hated me literally on sight, which, in all my naivete and innocence, I found to be perplexing, and I can only speculate that it was because she didn't want me to "steal her thunder" as the reigning "pretty light-skinned girl with good hair." I only knew that I was so excited to finally find someone who shared similar physical characteristics, I was confused and devastated when she showed her utter contempt for me before we even had the chance to meet face-to-face.

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@curlyhoney and ghostposter

I'm also a light mixed person and I can't say I've had that many negative experiences because of it. I've also been realizing lately that I don't know any other mixed people and I've never had a conversation with another (except for the 70 year old woman who used to do my hair) so it's interesting hearing people's experiences. I'm sorry there are people out there having such negative experiences. I've definitely had some dumb comments from people but I have no problem setting them straight. I hope you guys don't let it get you down and continue to love who you are.
I think a lot of the problems stem from feelings of inferiority...from black folks.

Some of us wanna "be" something other than "just black". It's just like the "indian ancestry" claims. Nothing wrong with being proud of your ancestry. But when someone looks at me, they see a "black" woman...not the indian/white/whatever blood that flows through my veins (which, btw, is the color "red").

Now, I do get asked if I have Native American ancestry (I do), because of my facial structure. But it's not something I can't wait to bring up, in everyday discussions. I also understand that I'm not "bi-racial". I'm just making a general point.

So, because some of us aren't happy with how it went down for us, we take issue with those who have what we want: light skin, "good hair", and societal privilege (so we think). Those people are constant reminders of what "could have been", had our parents made different mating choices. It's a sick mindset, for sure. It's hard to fix yourself.

Now, there are also some bi-racial individuals (those who have a black and a white parent), who wanna make SURE you know they're not "just black". Same book, different page. It's a different issue than just wanting to be appreciated for ALL of who you are. It's a way of separating yourself from the "garden variety black person", for whatever reason. A red flag goes up for me, when a bi-racial person throws a hissy fit, because somebody doesn't "recognize" that they're not "just black".

Bi-racial females are often thought of as being so much more "beautiful" and desirable (by many black men, in particular) simply because of their skin color/hair texture. Bi-racial women know this. Some are uncomfortable with it, others embrace and run with it. So be it.
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