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Old 12-13-2010, 08:47 AM   #101
 
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Old 12-13-2010, 09:47 AM   #102
 
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I forgot to add that my military friend has been spat on repeatedly and literally, by men in Dubai. And that she has restrained other soldiers (male) who accompanied her from responding in kind.
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Old 12-13-2010, 10:31 AM   #103
 
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I'm sorry for that. I'm sure that is difficult, but I just don't believe its the same as someone who literally does not have a choice. Even if someone has to break an oath, and even if someone has to lose some money and take their family to sleep at their parents' house, even if it means that they postpone their education, there is still a choice to say no. Some people don't really have a choice. I hope you understand my meaning of the difference. Some people just don't have a choice.



I'm not going to lie, I can't say I understand the appreciation for what soldiers are doing (except if you are with the war, then that would make sense). I don't mean it to be snide, I just don't really understand. I can understand being worried, being scared to death, being sympathetic. But to me, brave is giving up the money and the education and the oath and saying no because you feel something is really wrong. I don't mean to offend you, but this is how I see it.
I think this post shows that you have lived with great financial privilege and never had to make tough life choices. It's not postponing your education, it's not getting one at all. Moving your family in with your parents? That would mean you have parents who have a big enough house and the means to support you. Not everyone has that luxury. Oh, and saying no after you take an oath, that is called desertion and your ass gets thrown in jail. We have not executed anyone for it in a while, but it is on the books as a penalty.
I suspect this is the point sarasara may be missing on this. The U.S. Military recruits CHILDREN, often in low income areas, who are still in high school with promises of money for college and a decent salary. They are known to use extremely sketchy tactics to "recruit" and I would even say that some downright lie to get young people to join. Once you join, you are LEGALLY bound to your "oath". It's not just a promise. It's a LEGAL contract. If you decide to say "no," you WILL go to jail, have to pay fines, etc.
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Old 12-13-2010, 11:14 AM   #104
 
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I know some people protested against the war. I'm not sure what you're trying to prove. That you're not stupid? I didn't say you are. I said SOME and I also used the word in the title of my thread. I think "some" is a word that you use in your language, so you should know what it means.
OK, so you insist you're not calling me stupid and in the next breath you sarcastically imply that I am poorly schooled my own language. Hmmmmm.

So I'm not the first person who's told you the brick wall thing? Look for the common denominator there — maybe all the people who've said it to you had a point.

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Old 12-13-2010, 11:25 AM   #105
 
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Wild~hair, you were right. It's not worth bothering with her anymore.
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Old 12-13-2010, 11:54 AM   #106
 
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Wild~hair, you were right. It's not worth bothering with her anymore.
I know! I couldn't resist.

Ah well, I'm not that bright, you know.
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Old 12-13-2010, 07:54 PM   #107
 
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I'm sorry for that. I'm sure that is difficult, but I just don't believe its the same as someone who literally does not have a choice. Even if someone has to break an oath, and even if someone has to lose some money and take their family to sleep at their parents' house, even if it means that they postpone their education, there is still a choice to say no. Some people don't really have a choice. I hope you understand my meaning of the difference. Some people just don't have a choice.



I'm not going to lie, I can't say I understand the appreciation for what soldiers are doing (except if you are with the war, then that would make sense). I don't mean it to be snide, I just don't really understand. I can understand being worried, being scared to death, being sympathetic. But to me, brave is giving up the money and the education and the oath and saying no because you feel something is really wrong. I don't mean to offend you, but this is how I see it.
I think this post shows that you have lived with great financial privilege and never had to make tough life choices. It's not postponing your education, it's not getting one at all. Moving your family in with your parents? That would mean you have parents who have a big enough house and the means to support you. Not everyone has that luxury. Oh, and saying no after you take an oath, that is called desertion and your ass gets thrown in jail. We have not executed anyone for it in a while, but it is on the books as a penalty.
I suspect this is the point sarasara may be missing on this. The U.S. Military recruits CHILDREN, often in low income areas, who are still in high school with promises of money for college and a decent salary. They are known to use extremely sketchy tactics to "recruit" and I would even say that some downright lie to get young people to join. Once you join, you are LEGALLY bound to your "oath". It's not just a promise. It's a LEGAL contract. If you decide to say "no," you WILL go to jail, have to pay fines, etc.

Thanks for explaining that. I didn't know saying "no" means jail.
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Old 12-13-2010, 07:58 PM   #108
 
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I think this post shows that you have lived with great financial privilege and never had to make tough life choices. It's not postponing your education, it's not getting one at all. Moving your family in with your parents? That would mean you have parents who have a big enough house and the means to support you. Not everyone has that luxury. Oh, and saying no after you take an oath, that is called desertion and your ass gets thrown in jail. We have not executed anyone for it in a while, but it is on the books as a penalty.
I suspect this is the point sarasara may be missing on this. The U.S. Military recruits CHILDREN, often in low income areas, who are still in high school with promises of money for college and a decent salary. They are known to use extremely sketchy tactics to "recruit" and I would even say that some downright lie to get young people to join. Once you join, you are LEGALLY bound to your "oath". It's not just a promise. It's a LEGAL contract. If you decide to say "no," you WILL go to jail, have to pay fines, etc.

Thanks for explaining that. I didn't know saying "no" means jail.
Yes. The gov't owns you for the duration of your contract once you enter the military.
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Old 12-13-2010, 07:59 PM   #109
 
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This is a tricky point. During and after the Vietnam War, many of those who served were badly treated by the public. Imo, they received a double blow: the hell of that particular conflict, then contempt from those who didn't support their choice to serve.

I honestly don't know what's right in this case. I have a close friend who served as a Med-Evac in Iraq for two years. She says she does it for her daughter: that her concerns about preventing some of the worst abuses against women making their way to this country keep her going when it's most challenging. She is more politically conservative than I am, but she's a great person who believes what she's doing is right. So, I support her, because I don't know how to resolve the conflicts we have in the region.

I don't think it's easy to find soldiers who serve despite disagreeing with the war. The psychological, physical, and logistical price they and their families pay far outweighs whatever benefits they accrue.

That's interesting. Thanks for sharing.
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Old 12-14-2010, 05:31 AM   #110
 
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I forgot to add that my military friend has been spat on repeatedly and literally, by men in Dubai. And that she has restrained other soldiers (male) who accompanied her from responding in kind.
Although I have never heard of incidents like this, I'm not surprised. People in the Middle East don't look at soldiers favorably at all, to say the least. Even people who are less "ignorant, bigoted and biased" than I am.


Basically, in many regions and with many people in the Middle East, the soldiers are regarded the same way George Bush is. Most people don't care if the soldiers will get their education after 10 years rather than today, or if they will have to squeeze themselves into a small and unluxurious house or experience discomforts. Most people see it like this: George Bush was the engineer or the brain behind this, and the soldiers were the construction workers. They helped him achieve his goals. If it weren't for them, there would be no army to go to Iraq and start a war. That's how many people see it.

Of course, there are a few people who hated Saddam (from Kuwait and Iraq, for example), so much that they were with the war and still are, and therefore the soldiers are their heros. I don't know how many of those exist today in the region.
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Old 12-14-2010, 08:15 AM   #111
 
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You're welcome.

Are people there aware of Donald Rumsfeld? I ask because he played an instrumental role in the decision to go to war, much like Kissinger did with Nixon in Viet Nam.
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Old 12-14-2010, 09:02 AM   #112
 
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sarasara, I was wondering if you would mind educating us on the correct way to pronounce "Iraq." I confess, I only know what I have heard here in America, which appears to be incorrect.
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Old 12-14-2010, 09:28 AM   #113
 
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sarasara, I was wondering if you would mind educating us on the correct way to pronounce "Iraq." I confess, I only know what I have heard here in America, which appears to be incorrect.
Iraq = short "i" sound like "in" + "rock"

Same for Iran: "in" - "n" + "Ron"

Not: "Eye-rack" and "eye-ran"...oy....
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Old 12-15-2010, 04:11 AM   #114
 
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You're welcome.

Are people there aware of Donald Rumsfeld? I ask because he played an instrumental role in the decision to go to war, much like Kissinger did with Nixon in Viet Nam.
I'm not sure how much people know. I actually don't remember much from the first years of the Iraq war. I was around 12 or 13 years old at that time, and although the whole region, including little kids, were in a way involved in politics, I don't remember the technicalities and specific people people talked about, criticized...etc.

I remember a general impression I had about the whole situation a few years before that, at around 9 or 10 years old, when the second Palestinian Intifada happened. It was around the same time when the Middle Eastern world was in upheaval about the Mohammad Al Durrah incident (footage that showed the 12 year old boy hiding behind his father and crying, and then was shot by Israeli fire. People then said that it was staged. Doesn't make much of a difference to me though since Israel has killed more than 1000 children in the past 10 years).

At around that time everyone watched a lot of news. It was the "family show" everyone watched together after the main meal. After that in a just a small amount of time, I was around 11 years old, I woke up and saw my mom and sister standing in front of the TV and telling me to see what happened (9/11). I remember my reaction being "Ya, so what? I mean what's the big deal." No, it wasn't a racist 11 year old reply, but the previous years had been full of violence and this just didn't seem strange to me....After getting used to a long time of "family shows" that consist of news showing little, dead children wrapped in flags and blood being carried by screaming and crying crowds (Muslims bury martyrs with in the same clothes and blood they were killed in, so there was a lot of this image daily), people with almost amputated legs or arms limping and trying to run, carrying a dying person in their arms, screaming mothers slapping themselves over their dead babies, I have to say, a plane flying through a building just didn't seem scary to me. It was more like, "Ya, what's new ? People who don't deserve to die die cruelly everyday...What's your point exactly?"


After that was the Iraq invasion, and all I can remember is George Bush's face all over our TV's.


I remember the Abu Ghraib torture camp. I didn't know what it was called then and that it happened under Rumsfeld's nose. I'm not sure if other people (i.e: the adults at that time) knew that he was.

I know this is a Wiki ( Abu Ghraib torture and prisoner abuse - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia )
but it has pictures that I've been exposed to when I was pretty young (blurred out ones, like on the page). I haven't seen those type of things in a while, but going back to them makes me really furious and disgusted all over again. Actually, more so now than before, because I didn't really get them then. After repeated violence against the Middle East (in Palestine, Iraq, Iran...etc), I think some stop caring about the specifics such as the names of the people involved, and they just really dislike the whole US government...Which I think also goes back to explain the spitting on the soldiers you talked about in Dubai...It doesn't matter if they were against the war, some people see them as soldiers who were supporting the war by fighting in it, and some may see that they're just part of the same group that was comitting those crimes above.

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Old 12-15-2010, 04:19 AM   #115
 
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sarasara, I was wondering if you would mind educating us on the correct way to pronounce "Iraq." I confess, I only know what I have heard here in America, which appears to be incorrect.

The correct ways to say "Iraq" and "Iran" in "English" is what Ghost Poster mentioned, but it's not the correct way to say "Iraq" in Arabic.

"Iran" in Persian is pronounced the same way " ee-ron."

But "Iraq" in Arabic is pronounced differently, because the "I" in Iraq stands for a letter that doesn't exist in the English language. However, that letter mostly resembles "eee-roq" and not "Aye-rack."
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Old 12-15-2010, 08:04 AM   #116
 
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You're welcome.

Are people there aware of Donald Rumsfeld? I ask because he played an instrumental role in the decision to go to war, much like Kissinger did with Nixon in Viet Nam.
I'm not sure how much people know. I actually don't remember much from the first years of the Iraq war. I was around 12 or 13 years old at that time, and although the whole region, including little kids, were in a way involved in politics, I don't remember the technicalities and specific people people talked about, criticized...etc.

I remember a general impression I had about the whole situation a few years before that, at around 9 or 10 years old, when the second Palestinian Intifada happened. It was around the same time when the Middle Eastern world was in upheaval about the Mohammad Al Durrah incident (footage that showed the 12 year old boy hiding behind his father and crying, and then was shot by Israeli fire. People then said that it was staged. Doesn't make much of a difference to me though since Israel has killed more than 1000 children in the past 10 years).

At around that time everyone watched a lot of news. It was the "family show" everyone watched together after the main meal. After that in a just a small amount of time, I was around 11 years old, I woke up and saw my mom and sister standing in front of the TV and telling me to see what happened (9/11). I remember my reaction being "Ya, so what? I mean what's the big deal." No, it wasn't a racist 11 year old reply, but the previous years had been full of violence and this just didn't seem strange to me....After getting used to a long time of "family shows" that consist of news showing little, dead children wrapped in flags and blood being carried by screaming and crying crowds (Muslims bury martyrs with in the same clothes and blood they were killed in, so there was a lot of this image daily), people with almost amputated legs or arms limping and trying to run, carrying a dying person in their arms, screaming mothers slapping themselves over their dead babies, I have to say, a plane flying through a building just didn't seem scary to me. It was more like, "Ya, what's new ? People who don't deserve to die die cruelly everyday...What's your point exactly?"


After that was the Iraq invasion, and all I can remember is George Bush's face all over our TV's.


I remember the Abu Ghraib torture camp. I didn't know what it was called then and that it happened under Rumsfeld's nose. I'm not sure if other people (i.e: the adults at that time) knew that he was.

I know this is a Wiki ( Abu Ghraib torture and prisoner abuse - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia )
but it has pictures that I've been exposed to when I was pretty young (blurred out ones, like on the page). I haven't seen those type of things in a while, but going back to them makes me really furious and disgusted all over again. Actually, more so now than before, because I didn't really get them then. After repeated violence against the Middle East (in Palestine, Iraq, Iran...etc), I think some stop caring about the specifics such as the names of the people involved, and they just really dislike the whole US government...Which I think also goes back to explain the spitting on the soldiers you talked about in Dubai...It doesn't matter if they were against the war, some people see them as soldiers who were supporting the war by fighting in it, and some may see that they're just part of the same group that was comitting those crimes above.
sarasara, What you have to realize is that most Americans are just as horrified at this (Abu Ghraive and other torturing) as anyone else is. I'm terribly ashamed that these "soldiers" are Americans and therefore representing America in other parts of the world. However, while it may not seem true to you, this does NOT happen everywhere and is NOT generally acceptable in American culture. It is NOT the norm for American soldiers to think and act this way and most simply want to do a good job. Also, just because I'm horrified by this does not make me any LESS horrified by what happened on 9/11 or any other violent event. The fact that someone isn't bothered by the events of 9/11 shows more about their character than anyone elses.
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Old 12-15-2010, 09:16 AM   #117
 
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You're welcome.

Are people there aware of Donald Rumsfeld? I ask because he played an instrumental role in the decision to go to war, much like Kissinger did with Nixon in Viet Nam.
I'm not sure how much people know. I actually don't remember much from the first years of the Iraq war. I was around 12 or 13 years old at that time, and although the whole region, including little kids, were in a way involved in politics, I don't remember the technicalities and specific people people talked about, criticized...etc.

I remember a general impression I had about the whole situation a few years before that, at around 9 or 10 years old, when the second Palestinian Intifada happened. It was around the same time when the Middle Eastern world was in upheaval about the Mohammad Al Durrah incident (footage that showed the 12 year old boy hiding behind his father and crying, and then was shot by Israeli fire. People then said that it was staged. Doesn't make much of a difference to me though since Israel has killed more than 1000 children in the past 10 years).

At around that time everyone watched a lot of news. It was the "family show" everyone watched together after the main meal. After that in a just a small amount of time, I was around 11 years old, I woke up and saw my mom and sister standing in front of the TV and telling me to see what happened (9/11). I remember my reaction being "Ya, so what? I mean what's the big deal." No, it wasn't a racist 11 year old reply, but the previous years had been full of violence and this just didn't seem strange to me....After getting used to a long time of "family shows" that consist of news showing little, dead children wrapped in flags and blood being carried by screaming and crying crowds (Muslims bury martyrs with in the same clothes and blood they were killed in, so there was a lot of this image daily), people with almost amputated legs or arms limping and trying to run, carrying a dying person in their arms, screaming mothers slapping themselves over their dead babies, I have to say, a plane flying through a building just didn't seem scary to me. It was more like, "Ya, what's new ? People who don't deserve to die die cruelly everyday...What's your point exactly?"


After that was the Iraq invasion, and all I can remember is George Bush's face all over our TV's.


I remember the Abu Ghraib torture camp. I didn't know what it was called then and that it happened under Rumsfeld's nose. I'm not sure if other people (i.e: the adults at that time) knew that he was.

I know this is a Wiki ( Abu Ghraib torture and prisoner abuse - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia )
but it has pictures that I've been exposed to when I was pretty young (blurred out ones, like on the page). I haven't seen those type of things in a while, but going back to them makes me really furious and disgusted all over again. Actually, more so now than before, because I didn't really get them then. After repeated violence against the Middle East (in Palestine, Iraq, Iran...etc), I think some stop caring about the specifics such as the names of the people involved, and they just really dislike the whole US government...Which I think also goes back to explain the spitting on the soldiers you talked about in Dubai...It doesn't matter if they were against the war, some people see them as soldiers who were supporting the war by fighting in it, and some may see that they're just part of the same group that was comitting those crimes above.
sarasara, What you have to realize is that most Americans are just as horrified at this (Abu Ghraive and other torturing) as anyone else is. I'm terribly ashamed that these "soldiers" are Americans and therefore representing America in other parts of the world. However, while it may not seem true to you, this does NOT happen everywhere and is NOT generally acceptable in American culture. It is NOT the norm for American soldiers to think and act this way and most simply want to do a good job. Also, just because I'm horrified by this does not make me any LESS horrified by what happened on 9/11 or any other violent event. The fact that someone isn't bothered by the events of 9/11 shows more about their character than anyone elses.

I think I talked about my 11 year old reaction to 9/11, and how I wasn't surprised about this act of violence because I saw it happening in different ways everyday. That was how I thought the world ran, at 11 years old. It was just something that fit into the everyday news. That didn't mean the news were less horrible, but it meant that I wasn't shocked or surprised by them because that's how I saw life everyday. I think I've explained this in detail, so understand it as you may.


In the last paragraph where I talked about Abu Ghraib, and people's reactions, I was talking about just that. Some people's reactions. How some people (for example, the people who would spit on a soldiers face, as ninja dog mentioned) feel and why. That's why in those sentences where I explained some people's feelings, I used the words "some people" and not "I."


I don't think I have much to add anymore. Maybe I can't express myself well, or maybe I'm too "ignorant and bigotted" for people on this board. I'm also tired of having to say the word "some" and stress on it. "Some," even if not a big part of a population, has a big effect. "Some" terrorists made 9/11 happen, and look what happend to the world. "Some" evil people hurt many good people. I'm talking about this "some" here, the "some" that obviously has a pretty big impact on the world. Yet people here only want to talk about the majority, the majority of good people who although good, will probably not be able or won't do much good difference in the world.

Last edited by sarasara; 12-15-2010 at 09:20 AM.
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Old 12-15-2010, 09:27 AM   #118
 
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I'm not sure how much people know. I actually don't remember much from the first years of the Iraq war. I was around 12 or 13 years old at that time, and although the whole region, including little kids, were in a way involved in politics, I don't remember the technicalities and specific people people talked about, criticized...etc.

I remember a general impression I had about the whole situation a few years before that, at around 9 or 10 years old, when the second Palestinian Intifada happened. It was around the same time when the Middle Eastern world was in upheaval about the Mohammad Al Durrah incident (footage that showed the 12 year old boy hiding behind his father and crying, and then was shot by Israeli fire. People then said that it was staged. Doesn't make much of a difference to me though since Israel has killed more than 1000 children in the past 10 years).

At around that time everyone watched a lot of news. It was the "family show" everyone watched together after the main meal. After that in a just a small amount of time, I was around 11 years old, I woke up and saw my mom and sister standing in front of the TV and telling me to see what happened (9/11). I remember my reaction being "Ya, so what? I mean what's the big deal." No, it wasn't a racist 11 year old reply, but the previous years had been full of violence and this just didn't seem strange to me....After getting used to a long time of "family shows" that consist of news showing little, dead children wrapped in flags and blood being carried by screaming and crying crowds (Muslims bury martyrs with in the same clothes and blood they were killed in, so there was a lot of this image daily), people with almost amputated legs or arms limping and trying to run, carrying a dying person in their arms, screaming mothers slapping themselves over their dead babies, I have to say, a plane flying through a building just didn't seem scary to me. It was more like, "Ya, what's new ? People who don't deserve to die die cruelly everyday...What's your point exactly?"


After that was the Iraq invasion, and all I can remember is George Bush's face all over our TV's.


I remember the Abu Ghraib torture camp. I didn't know what it was called then and that it happened under Rumsfeld's nose. I'm not sure if other people (i.e: the adults at that time) knew that he was.

I know this is a Wiki ( Abu Ghraib torture and prisoner abuse - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia )
but it has pictures that I've been exposed to when I was pretty young (blurred out ones, like on the page). I haven't seen those type of things in a while, but going back to them makes me really furious and disgusted all over again. Actually, more so now than before, because I didn't really get them then. After repeated violence against the Middle East (in Palestine, Iraq, Iran...etc), I think some stop caring about the specifics such as the names of the people involved, and they just really dislike the whole US government...Which I think also goes back to explain the spitting on the soldiers you talked about in Dubai...It doesn't matter if they were against the war, some people see them as soldiers who were supporting the war by fighting in it, and some may see that they're just part of the same group that was comitting those crimes above.
sarasara, What you have to realize is that most Americans are just as horrified at this (Abu Ghraive and other torturing) as anyone else is. I'm terribly ashamed that these "soldiers" are Americans and therefore representing America in other parts of the world. However, while it may not seem true to you, this does NOT happen everywhere and is NOT generally acceptable in American culture. It is NOT the norm for American soldiers to think and act this way and most simply want to do a good job. Also, just because I'm horrified by this does not make me any LESS horrified by what happened on 9/11 or any other violent event. The fact that someone isn't bothered by the events of 9/11 shows more about their character than anyone elses.

I think I talked about my 11 year old reaction to 9/11, and how I wasn't surprised about this act of violence because I saw it happening in different ways everyday. That was how I thought the world ran, at 11 years old. It was just something that fit into the everyday news. That didn't mean the news were less horrible, but it meant that I wasn't shocked or surprised by them because that's how I saw life everyday. I think I've explained this in detail, so understand it as you may.


In the last paragraph where I talked about Abu Ghraib, and people's reactions, I was talking about just that. Some people's reactions. How some people (for example, the people who would spit on a soldiers face, as ninja dog mentioned) feel and why. That's why in those sentences where I explained some people's feelings, I used the words "some people" and not "I."


I don't think I have much to add anymore. Maybe I can't express myself well, or maybe I'm too "ignorant and bigotted" for people on this board. I'm also tired of having to say the word "some" and stress on it. "Some," even if not a big part of a population, has a big effect. "Some" terrorists made 9/11 happen, and look what happend to the world. "Some" evil people hurt many good people. I'm talking about this "some" here, the "some" that obviously has a pretty big impact on the world. Yet people here only want to talk about the majority, the majority of good people who although good, will probably not be able or won't do much good difference in the world.
Still, you're missing the point. This isn't an American or a Palestine or a whatever-country thing. Americans are not more innately stupid or violent or what have you, neither is any other group from any other country. It is an individual who is stupid or violent or stupid AND violent or whatever. It just so happens that these stupid/violent people get all the press. You have a certain perspective and you're entitled to that, given your experience. However, when you come on a message board that is mostly American looking for another perspective on your opinion, you better be open to hearing it without getting ridiculously defensive (or offensive).
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Old 12-15-2010, 09:52 AM   #119
 
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sarasara, What you have to realize is that most Americans are just as horrified at this (Abu Ghraive and other torturing) as anyone else is. I'm terribly ashamed that these "soldiers" are Americans and therefore representing America in other parts of the world. However, while it may not seem true to you, this does NOT happen everywhere and is NOT generally acceptable in American culture. It is NOT the norm for American soldiers to think and act this way and most simply want to do a good job. Also, just because I'm horrified by this does not make me any LESS horrified by what happened on 9/11 or any other violent event. The fact that someone isn't bothered by the events of 9/11 shows more about their character than anyone elses.

I think I talked about my 11 year old reaction to 9/11, and how I wasn't surprised about this act of violence because I saw it happening in different ways everyday. That was how I thought the world ran, at 11 years old. It was just something that fit into the everyday news. That didn't mean the news were less horrible, but it meant that I wasn't shocked or surprised by them because that's how I saw life everyday. I think I've explained this in detail, so understand it as you may.


In the last paragraph where I talked about Abu Ghraib, and people's reactions, I was talking about just that. Some people's reactions. How some people (for example, the people who would spit on a soldiers face, as ninja dog mentioned) feel and why. That's why in those sentences where I explained some people's feelings, I used the words "some people" and not "I."


I don't think I have much to add anymore. Maybe I can't express myself well, or maybe I'm too "ignorant and bigotted" for people on this board. I'm also tired of having to say the word "some" and stress on it. "Some," even if not a big part of a population, has a big effect. "Some" terrorists made 9/11 happen, and look what happend to the world. "Some" evil people hurt many good people. I'm talking about this "some" here, the "some" that obviously has a pretty big impact on the world. Yet people here only want to talk about the majority, the majority of good people who although good, will probably not be able or won't do much good difference in the world.
Still, you're missing the point. This isn't an American or a Palestine or a whatever-country thing. Americans are not more innately stupid or violent or what have you, neither is any other group from any other country. It is an individual who is stupid or violent or stupid AND violent or whatever. It just so happens that these stupid/violent people get all the press. You have a certain perspective and you're entitled to that, given your experience. However, when you come on a message board that is mostly American looking for another perspective on your opinion, you better be open to hearing it without getting ridiculously defensive (or offensive).
You're right actually, I should have probably tried to discuss this with someone not American, so that they won't be offended. I did post it this video on my FB and asked if it was a joke, and most people just made comments such as "hahahhahah what dumbasses" which I don't think helped me much in what I was trying to look for, which is why I also posted here. I don't belong to any Arab message boards and I don't know any people in Japan who I can communicate well with because of language difficulties, so I just posted this here.

Last edited by sarasara; 12-15-2010 at 09:54 AM.
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Old 12-15-2010, 02:01 PM   #120
 
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Sometimes posts go awry.

I understand that you feel very differently from many of us, and I can respect that. There's truth in what L.A. said about knowing your audience, but also, attitude is key. Sometimes we feel how we feel, though, so we have to learn with whom we can speak about certain subjects. I've learned that about some things here, and I know others have as well.

I hope your time in Japan is enjoyable.
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