Court reporting

Does anyone here work as a court report or know anyone that does. Since there is a long waiting list for nursing school I am thinking of something else to do. I have check some website info still searching

How long have your worked as a court reporter?.
How long was your schooling?
Please list any revelant experiences good or bad.
Website recommendations.
Do you work for an agency?
Difficulty finding a job.
etc.

Thanks in advance for your answers.
I'm not sure, but I think that springcurl used to court report before she went into captioning. Maybe jot her a pm.
Hi nepanthe:

Here is the DOL Occupational Outlook Handbook entry on court reporting. I find this site very helpful. http://www.bls.gov/oco/ocos152.htm
There are also links to "additional resources." It sounds like an interesting job.
I'm a court reporter.

How long have your worked as a court reporter?
I worked in court and with depositions for two years then moved to captioning. Same skill, just different duties.

How long was your schooling?
There's lots of classes to take. It took me three years. You have to take a lot of prerequisite law and medical classes, then you move on to the machine. First you learn the theory, then you have to build speed. Some people find speed building very difficult and it takes them a longer or they get stuck at a certain speed and it takes them a while to break through.
In order to graduate, you have to be at a minimum 225 words a minute with no lower than a 95% on your final test. That actually shouldn't be a problem if you have the speed.

Please list any revelant experiences good or bad.
The worst part about depositions is that sometimes you're there for eight hours and only one lawyer wants a copy. Or sometimes you'll travel 75 miles for a deposition and when you get there the job is cancelled.
On the good side, the money's very good and you set your own days that you want to take depositions.

Live news captioning is more difficult, but it's also steady work, good pay and usually good benefits. The downside is that you have to be EXTREMELY accurate and have nerves of steel. Once I was captioning the CBS Evening News and the reporter said, "With the incoming Republican majority, you can expect not only a leaner Congress, but a meaner one." I wrote, "With the incoming Republican majority, you can expect not only a leaner c o c k, but a meaner one." I thought I was going to be fired.

Website recommendations.
LINK
This has good information about captioning, and there's also links to the NCRA, National Court Reporters Association, where you can find information about reporting. There's also a five year old interview with yours truly.

Do you work for an agency?
When I was a court reporter, I worked freelance for an agency. The going cut that they take from your pay is about 38%... they supply you with paper, a printer and sometimes the software on which to edit your work. Now that I'm in captioning, I work for a captioning company where I'm an actual employee.



Difficulty finding a job.
None. It's a high-skilled and highly in demand job.
In addition, you have lots of avenues open to you: Captioning, court reporting, CART reporting. CART reporting is going to school with deaf people and captioning what their teachers and classmates say. Or going to boardrooms with deaf people and captioning what their coworkers say.

Two last bits of advice. Please do not become a "court reporter" who is a voice writer. They simply put a mask on their face and parrot back everything everyone says into a tape recorder. It's not really a skill, and the training is less, that means the money is less and the profession is not as respected. In addition, if you choose voice writing, you're pretty much stuck in the courtroom. 95% accuracy in a courtroom setting for a voice writer is considered exemplary. In captioning and CART writing, 95% accuracy makes you hang your head in shame.

Lastly, if you decide to become a stenographer, please choose a school that is accredited by the NCRA. There are set guidlines you will have to follow before you can graduate and that makes you more desirable to prospective employers.

Good luck. Ask away if you have any questions, or feel free to PM me.[/url]


Obamacare is not a blueprint for socialism. You're thinking of the New Testament. ~~ John Fugelsang



Hi nepanthe:

Here is the DOL Occupational Outlook Handbook entry on court reporting. I find this site very helpful. http://www.bls.gov/oco/ocos152.htm
There are also links to "additional resources." It sounds like an interesting job.
Originally Posted by Resume Writer
thanks
I'm a court reporter.

How long have your worked as a court reporter?
I worked in court and with depositions for two years then moved to captioning. Same skill, just different duties.

How long was your schooling?
There's lots of classes to take. It took me three years. You have to take a lot of prerequisite law and medical classes, then you move on to the machine. First you learn the theory, then you have to build speed. Some people find speed building very difficult and it takes them a longer or they get stuck at a certain speed and it takes them a while to break through.
In order to graduate, you have to be at a minimum 225 words a minute with no lower than a 95% on your final test. That actually shouldn't be a problem if you have the speed.

Please list any revelant experiences good or bad.
The worst part about depositions is that sometimes you're there for eight hours and only one lawyer wants a copy. Or sometimes you'll travel 75 miles for a deposition and when you get there the job is cancelled.
On the good side, the money's very good and you set your own days that you want to take depositions.

Live news captioning is more difficult, but it's also steady work, good pay and usually good benefits. The downside is that you have to be EXTREMELY accurate and have nerves of steel. Once I was captioning the CBS Evening News and the reporter said, "With the incoming Republican majority, you can expect not only a leaner Congress, but a meaner one." I wrote, "With the incoming Republican majority, you can expect not only a leaner c o c k, but a meaner one." I thought I was going to be fired.

Website recommendations.
LINK
This has good information about captioning, and there's also links to the NCRA, National Court Reporters Association, where you can find information about reporting. There's also a five year old interview with yours truly.

Do you work for an agency?
When I was a court reporter, I worked freelance for an agency. The going cut that they take from your pay is about 38%... they supply you with paper, a printer and sometimes the software on which to edit your work. Now that I'm in captioning, I work for a captioning company where I'm an actual employee.



Difficulty finding a job.
None. It's a high-skilled and highly in demand job.
In addition, you have lots of avenues open to you: Captioning, court reporting, CART reporting. CART reporting is going to school with deaf people and captioning what their teachers and classmates say. Or going to boardrooms with deaf people and captioning what their coworkers say.

Two last bits of advice. Please do not become a "court reporter" who is a voice writer. They simply put a mask on their face and parrot back everything everyone says into a tape recorder. It's not really a skill, and the training is less, that means the money is less and the profession is not as respected. In addition, if you choose voice writing, you're pretty much stuck in the courtroom. 95% accuracy in a courtroom setting for a voice writer is considered exemplary. In captioning and CART writing, 95% accuracy makes you hang your head in shame.

Lastly, if you decide to become a stenographer, please choose a school that is accredited by the NCRA. There are set guidlines you will have to follow before you can graduate and that makes you more desirable to prospective employers.

Good luck. Ask away if you have any questions, or feel free to PM me.[/url]
Originally Posted by Springcurl
I will most definitely pm you if I have more questions..I am supposed to meet with a representative from one of the schools in my area on Friday. As I countinue doing my resesarch I will definitely pm you any questions I might have. I promise to keep those questions to a minimum.

Thank you so much!!
I went to school for it for 3 years. I ended up quitting. It was difficult and monotonous. I don't want to disuade you, if that is truly what you want. I don't know how to explain it but it is not necessarily something to be "learned" I mean obviously you have to learn it, but there is skill involved. Some people just don't have the ability to listen and take notes - keyboard, VERY quickly and then be able to make heads or tails of what they have taken down.

I guess what made me throw in the towel was:

1. I already had a job in marketing/advertising and realized that was what I truly loved to do.

2. A court reporter came into the class and said she was making $35K max after graduating and working her a** off.

3. I learned I could make a lot more money doing what I was doing. So I dropped out of CR school and went to regular college to focus on marketing.


4. We did some mock trial stuff and after listening to some of the cases I realized there was no way I could sit in a chair for 8 hours listening to that cr**....

Also, I'll mention I was VERY young at the time. 18 to be exact. I had no idea what I wanted to do with my life at that point. Not even a clue...

In my opinion it wasn't worth going through the torture of the classes if I wasn't going to make a lot of money in return.

I will say that I ran into a girl that I went to school with and she is making good money now and married a lawyer...so I guess it can work for some people.


But everyone is different, you might love it and excel at it.
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Crap on a cracker. I wrote you a post yesterday regarding the topic and even mentioned BLS. It didn't post. Now, I have nothing for you. Good luck. The training must be rigorous with a good screening process, b/c I've only had one "bad" cr in 16 years. She probably wasn't bad, though. Se just wasn't as "good" as the others I had encountered.

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