Article - body size in the seventies....

Dh and I were just talking about this- All 4 of us are thin, but eat a lot, and a lot of "fattening" foods like cookies, pot pie, etc. And there are large people on both sides of my family. The thing is, and I think this is the thing,.... I cook almost everything we eat from scratch, and with good ingredients too. And we don't drink much juice or any soda. We eat so much, I'm always buying butter, but it doesn't make us fat, and I'm convinced its the lack of chemicals. In college I used to eat much less, but it was all that crap that comes in boxes, and I gained and gained until I started to cook real food. Its sad, but my 4 year old already knows more about cooking than a lot of adults I know... I think people don't realize how odd it is for something to have 25 ingredients listed, unless they know how to make it with 5.
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Acres of cellulite? I thought we couldn't help that as women...
I was a teen in the 70's and I agree with what was said in the article and here. Too much sugar, salt, snacks, chemicals. Too little exercise and fresh air.
But the one thing I've really noticed over the years is the change in portions. I think many of you would be shocked at what portions looked like in the 70's. When we went to the local drive-in for a Coke and an ice cream cone - it was a 12oz. Coke and a small cone that was actually small. When I go to that same drive-in today, I share their smallest size drink with Mr. Jeep and order the baby cone, which is bigger than the small cone of years back. And I can make 2 or 3 meals out of most restaurant portions today. I think we've lost al knowledge of how much we're actually supposed to eat!
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Definitely portion size. A good example is the pastrami hamburger. That thing is huge! I went to the drive thru at Carls Jr one night and when I said I didn't want to biggy size it, the girl seemed surprised. I'm in a newly developed area and we already have 6 fast food places here and 3 pizza places. Thank goodness for Say Sushi. It's more exp;ensive, but I treat myself once a week.

I wonder if stress has anything to do with it. Some people eat when they are stressed and also drink alcohol.
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High Fructose Corn Syrup. It's in almost everything these days and it's the debbil.
High Fructose Corn Syrup. It's in almost everything these days and it's the debbil.
Originally Posted by medussa
Yes! That and MSG, Sodium Benzoate, etc.
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my husband, who's a vegetarian and an avid follower of "sugar blues," that '70s bible of nutrition, has really educated me about how often sugar crops up in surprising places--soups, rice/soy milk, salad dressings, pasta sauce.... this can be in the form of high fructose corn syrup like medussa said or "organic cane juice," etc., etc. even food sold at whole foods comes laden with sugar. i've become an avid label reader. one brand of soy milk or tomato soup might be loaded with sugar and a competing brand of the same thing won't have any. and they'll taste the same. it's been a real eye-opener.
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High Fructose Corn Syrup. It's in almost everything these days and it's the debbil.
Originally Posted by medussa
Once again, medussa speaks the truth. (I always enjoy your posts, BTW, because they're sensitive as well as smart).

My DH and I stopped eating fast food and cut HFCS out of our diets, and we feel and look much better. He was AMAZED how much HFCS is lurking in the most unlikely places. He called me at work one day to report that HFCS was the #2 ingredient in saltine crackers! You've got to be extra-diligent to keep away from this stuff, lemmetellya.
High Fructose Corn Syrup. It's in almost everything these days and it's the debbil.
Originally Posted by medussa
Once again, medussa speaks the truth. (I always enjoy your posts, BTW, because they're sensitive as well as smart).
Originally Posted by Way Wavy
Hey, thanks Way Wavy! That was really nice of you to say.
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http://www.telegraph.co.uk/portal/main.jhtml?xml=/portal/2007/01/26/nosplit/ftfat126.xml
Originally Posted by three rivers curly
Great article. Thanks for posting it.

No folds of dimpled flesh hanging over trunks or bikini bottoms, no acres of cellulite or pitifully fat children waddling down to the sea.
This is on point. Another thing that I find off is that the nature or type of fat gain now compared to what I see in my parents' generation. With that generation, fat people did not have tummies that hung down like sacks... they had a more toned quality than adults/children today have because they didn't sit around all day everyday only exercising the remote control finger.

Also, ITA with Sdcurly, Discgirl and Medussa.
I grew up in the 90s and our main drinks were soda or chocolate milk. I was actually surprised to see that other kids didn't keep soda in their house or have it with their meals. Needless to say, I had to overhaul my whole lifestyle starting from the age of 11. I am the only one in my family without elevated blood pressure or cholestoral. I am also the only one whose meals consists of mainly veggies and small portions of meat. I still drink an occasional soda, but mostly drink tea now.

I agree with those who said homecooked meals are important. I began experimenting with stir fry recipes when my SO stayed with me for two weeks for spring break. Almost every night we had chicken and various veggies over a generous mound of white rice. At the end of two weeks, my SO lost ten pounds, and that's with him eating every last bite of what I cooked. That made me a convert. I don't feel so bad when I eat "bad" food when I make it myself.
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http://www.telegraph.co.uk/portal/main.jhtml?xml=/portal/2007/01/26/nosplit/ftfat126.xml
Originally Posted by three rivers curly
Great article. Thanks for posting it.

No folds of dimpled flesh hanging over trunks or bikini bottoms, no acres of cellulite or pitifully fat children waddling down to the sea.
This is on point. Another thing that I find off is that the nature or type of fat gain now compared to what I see in my parents' generation. With that generation, fat people did not have tummies that hung down like sacks... they had a more toned quality than adults/children today have because they didn't sit around all day everyday only exercising the remote control finger.

Also, ITA with Sdcurly, Discgirl and Medussa.
Originally Posted by Cherish
Exactly. It was more their size than their shape that was larger. The word coming to mind is "thick" - but not all "thick" people are obese... It is like they were larger than the average size, but their bodies were shaped the same as smaller people.
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I was a teen in the 70's and I agree with what was said in the article and here. Too much sugar, salt, snacks, chemicals. Too little exercise and fresh air.
But the one thing I've really noticed over the years is the change in portions. I think many of you would be shocked at what portions looked like in the 70's. When we went to the local drive-in for a Coke and an ice cream cone - it was a 12oz. Coke and a small cone that was actually small. When I go to that same drive-in today, I share their smallest size drink with Mr. Jeep and order the baby cone, which is bigger than the small cone of years back. And I can make 2 or 3 meals out of most restaurant portions today. I think we've lost al knowledge of how much we're actually supposed to eat!
Originally Posted by jeepcurlygurl
I think you are exacty right. I've been saying it for years. Also, that trip to the drive in was a treat, not a regular visit. So those few extra calories are hardly even extra. The issue with convenience foods is also a contribution to the problem, as some one said, we don't realize what all the extra chemical ingredients are that go into that package in order to make it "convenient."
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I agree about the portions too. Living in Japan has been such an eye opener about how LARGE Americans are! The portions there are WAAAAAAAAAY smaller than in the US! A large fries at McDonalds in Japan is the size of a small fries in the states. I get the kids meal over there and it came with the real kids size cup that I remember when I was little (80s/90s). Now a kids meal comes with a much bigger cup than it used to in the US... And they fry their fries in a differrent kind of oil. M friend got so sick when she came back b/c her body wasn't used to eating over here anymore!
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I don't know. My experience is somewhat different. I grew up in the 70s, and what I remember is that what we ate at home was completely at odds with the cultural norm at the time. We ate: whole grain home made bread (my pediatrician actually ordered my mom to make her own bread! ), lots of fresh fruit and vegetables. Soda was not an option, it was milk, juice or water. Cultural norm (ie on TV shows, what friends ate etc): jello! marshmallows! sugary breakfast cereals. Packaged pudding. Layer cakes. Ice cream. Tons of processed food. Wonder bread. Instant mashed. Premade cookie dough. TV dinners--those were HUGE! I'm honestly not remembering that people in general were eating healthy then (except my family was and I still pretty much do). Also, I walked everywhere as a child (and still do, as much as possible), but that was completely against the norm in the midwest in the 70s. NO one walked anywhere if they could help it! And jogging and recreational biking? Ha! It wasn't until Jane Fonda came along and ONJ "got physical" that things changed in my neighborhood.

What is different now that I can see is that parents struggle with a lot more time pressure, and kids have more structured activities, so maybe family meals don't happen as much. Also, there's more awareness of crimes committed against children, so kids might have less outdoor time. And where I used to walk to and from school alone, most parents aren't going to let their kids walk alone nowadays & don't have time to walk with them, so it's the car. AND it's very lucrative for schools to have soda machines on-site, which has been the topic of many a local debate!
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About the soda machines - why don't they put in water machines? They could have recycling recepitcles on site, and get a recycling program started at the schools. It could definately be a win-win situation.

We are very big on natural, organic and non-processed foods in our house. We do some processed foods (very few) of course. However, as parents we are ridiculed because we don't let our kid have fun foods. She was 5 before she ever tasted soda. Apparently that makes us bad parents. She snacks on apples and carrots. This is bad? Our perception here in the US needs to change.
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I don't know what the deal is with public schools & soda machines, except that there's a lot of money involved. I don't have kids, so all I know is what makes the local news. I think Coca-Cola or Pepsi make big donations to schools, sort of back-door style, with the unspoken agreement that they can have their machines in the school. A lot of parents want the machines out. That would make a big difference right there.

Also, WTF? When I grew up, phys ed was pretty awful unless you were good at sports & all team-minded (I like solo exercising). We did a lot of basketball & tennis, but come on. Nowadays there's aerobics which even a klutz like me can do, there's dancing, there's martially arts stuff & boxing workouts. Soccer's gotten incredibly popular. Again, no kids here, so I don't know what the school curriculums are, but it sure seems to me like it would be lot easier to do an activity suited to your personality & abilities than it was in the dinosaur years.
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Also, WTF? When I grew up, phys ed was pretty awful unless you were good at sports & all team-minded (I like solo exercising). We did a lot of basketball & tennis, but come on. Nowadays there's aerobics which even a klutz like me can do, there's dancing, there's martially arts stuff & boxing workouts. Soccer's gotten incredibly popular. Again, no kids here, so I don't know what the school curriculums are, but it sure seems to me like it would be lot easier to do an activity suited to your personality & abilities than it was in the dinosaur years.
Originally Posted by Castella
Not so, at least to my knowledge. My younger relatives spend their PE practicing for the Presidential Fitness requirements. This means running laps and laps and laps.
Also, WTF? When I grew up, phys ed was pretty awful unless you were good at sports & all team-minded (I like solo exercising). We did a lot of basketball & tennis, but come on. Nowadays there's aerobics which even a klutz like me can do, there's dancing, there's martially arts stuff & boxing workouts. Soccer's gotten incredibly popular. Again, no kids here, so I don't know what the school curriculums are, but it sure seems to me like it would be lot easier to do an activity suited to your personality & abilities than it was in the dinosaur years.
Originally Posted by Castella
Not so, at least to my knowledge. My younger relatives spend their PE practicing for the Presidential Fitness requirements. This means running laps and laps and laps.
Originally Posted by Eilonwy
Ugh, PE *shudder* I am soooooo glad I'm not taking it anymore. I can't stand physical activity around random peers. I get all self-conscious and suddenly can't catch a ball for the life of me. I love playing games/sports with friends or dancing like crazy in my room alone or even in the middle of a dance floor surrounded by friends - but PE was hell. I hope I don't find later that I've seriously harmed my health by stopping PE - actually, y'know what, I think my mental health is more important. That was the worst class ever. If I didn't have my friends to hang out with I don't know what I could have done. Besides, I walk to and from school everyday. Anyway, yes, PE = laps and laps and laps. Even when you have a doctor's note for a hurt knee, CERTAIN teachers will just say "run it off." *grumble, grumble*
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There's a show on MTV right now called 'Fat Camp". I'm simply amazed at what I'm seeing.

I have a car, but guess what... I walk to safeway, trader joe's and walgreens and the GYM. I don't drive unless I have to.

When I was a kid, there was no such thing as 'fat camp" or dieting for kids for crissakes. The odd fat kid we knew had thyroid issues. We played ALL sports - so-called PE was sports after classes everyday excluding sundays, and walked everywhere. You don't like cross country running? Volleyball was not your thing? Tough... you sucked it up.

Argh!

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