Insight into homeschooling

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  • 1 Post By SCG
  • 1 Post By nynaeve77
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I'm not trying to be offensive here.

I know we have a few homeschoolers onboard (including Poison Ivy, whom I know personally and like a lot.)

I can respect the decision to homeschool...if there is a reason to. And I'm very flexible on what those reasons could be.

But just because? And forever?

I just inteviewed a woman who homeschools her own daughter and two other elementary school age children and also runs a daycare.

I am looking for new daycare. And this woman's operation seems really great, down to her informational website, the pre-school curciculum she uses, her BS and MS degrees, how the property is outfitted, etc.

My daughter goes to public school and that is my preference. I would consider private school. But I would never consider homeschooling, unless there was some extreme extenuating circumstance which necessitated that.

I want to understand some of the logic a homeschooler uses to decide to homeschool their child for 13 yrs (to see if I would have any philosophical differences w/ it) and get some of your personal experiences w/ people who homeschool (in case they have been overwhelmingly good or bad).

This woman's daughter will be 8 next month and will be starting 3rd grade...and she does not like being homeschooled. But mom says she is farily certain she will continue to homeschool this one and the younger one all the way through high school.

My daughter would continue going to the local public school and would only spend an hour there in the afternoon.

My son would be there for during my work hours for another 1.5 yrs.

I just worry that this woman might be hard to deal with or that she might be sending some weird messages to my kids about attending public school, esp if her daughter is jealous that my daughter goes to public school (and my daughter loves school so I'm sure she will be saying positive things about school).

Or maybe this woman wil be a tremendous asset to my kids!

I asked her about her reasons for homeschooling and she said she wants to be sure her kids are learning (OK, but we live in an excellent school district and the public schools are consistently rated high, so why would she be worried about that?) and she wants God to remain in the classroom (and that's fine, too but she is Lutheran which is pretty mainline and there are tons of schools run by the Lutheran or similar church...plus parents can still raise God-loving ids and send them to public school).

Just looking for thoughts, opinions and experiences re. homeschooling.

I am interviewing other providers/centers, too, but I do like certain aspects of this one.

Yes, if I am dissatisfied I can always look elsewhere but switching daycare again is something I am really trying to avoid if possible.
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Last edited by spiderlashes5000; 05-11-2012 at 02:24 PM.
Let me preface this by saying that I was homeschooled and cyber-schooled growing up, and I now work for a cyber charter school. So, if it seems like I'm giving a sales pitch for either... Well, I can't really help it! All I can say is that it's not on purpose!

I think, for most families, it comes down to parents wanting to be more involved in their child's education. For each family, the particular reasons that come after that vary - some parents do it for religious reasons, other families do it because their kids just aren't getting the attention that they need in a classroom setting. I can honestly say that my aforementioned circumstances have put me in contact with homeschooling families of various different backgrounds, and only on very rare occasions are they the "weird" homeschoolers that some will have you believe make up the majority. I think you'll find that most of them won't try to "convert" you, either, although I obviously can't speak for everyone.

My mother chose it for a couple of reasons. At the time, my brother was going to our local public school, and my mother found that he wasn't really learning anything because the teacher was so pre-occupied with disciplining the other students in his classroom. Now, mind you, we live in a very small town with a very small (though fairly high rated) school district, with small class sizes. Even so, he wasn't getting the education he needed. Homeschooling him (and later, the rest of us) gave her the opportunity to focus on his individual educational needs, which were not necessarily being met previously. A nice side-effect of homeschooling us was that she was able to have a say in how we were being influenced. I don't mean that she "sheltered" us. But instead of allowing our peers to be the main influences in our life, she was. I can't think of a better way to say this... I hope that doesn't come across as sounding stranger than it really is. We all had plenty of friends, and spent a lot of time with them (field trips, co-ops, etc.), but our parents were the ones who had the greatest influence and impact on us.

It makes me sad that she continues to homeschool her daughter even though she doesn't seem to like it, though. Once we hit a certain age (junior high), my parents always gave us the choice to continue with home/cyber-schooling, or going to a traditional brick-and-mortar school. Each of us chose different paths: my brother attended private school for jr. high, and then transferred to the local public school again when he was ready. My sister stuck with it until high school, and then went to public school. My little brother is now in the process of deciding what he wants to do.

On the other hand, I stuck with it all 13 years by my own choice - my mother had nothing to do with it. I chose it mostly because I wanted to work at my own pace, which seemed to be a little faster than my peers in some areas, and slower in others... I liked the independence that it offered me. It allowed me to travel, work, and get other valuable life-experiences that I might not have been able to get, if I had been in a brick-and-mortar school. It also allowed me to take college classes in high school, which is always a plus!

I can't tell if I've answered all of your questions... If you have any others, or want insight on something else, feel free to ask!
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I have a good friend who was homeschooled, as was her brother. They are both nothing short of BRILLIANT- her brother went to MIT, and she goes Scripps College, which is part of the Claremont consortium. They both started out in public schools but were pretty unhappy, and being homeschooled/cyberschooled through high school gave them the flexibility they needed. They both attended academic summer camps that had more traditional classroom settings and had extracurriculars with kids their age, like painting and music classes. They're both very quirky but incredibly interesting people.
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My older son has a speech delay. I would consider homeschooling him in elementary school if public school and private school didn't work out well, but it wouldn't be my first choice. I work outside the home, so it would require a major lifestyle change, and I think it's usually good for kids to have the social experiences of school.

The people I know who homeschool have a very "traditional" lifestyle (husband is breadwinner, wife stays home) and are quite religious, and want to give their children a very strong religious education. I know that's not true for everyone, but that's my mental concept of homeschooling families.
My only real life experience with a home school family is through talking to a mom who homeschools her kids. She is very religious and has her kids learning greek, latin, etc, so that they can read and learn from the "original translations," which she wouldn't specify. It all sounded rather odd to me, but she's only one person.

I also know another (Adult) guy who was homeschooled, also due to religious reasons, whose parents were super crazy - to the point of having to sneak around to avoid being arrested because homeschooling was apparently illegal at the time. The guy is very smart and went on to a university at age 16, but he said he would never homeschool his own kids, if he had any.
My only real life experience with a home school family is through talking to a mom who homeschools her kids. She is very religious and has her kids learning greek, latin, etc, so that they can read and learn from the "original translations," which she wouldn't specify. It all sounded rather odd to me, but she's only one person.

I also know another (Adult) guy who was homeschooled, also due to religious reasons, whose parents were super crazy - to the point of having to sneak around to avoid being arrested because homeschooling was apparently illegal at the time. The guy is very smart and went on to a university at age 16, but he said he would never homeschool his own kids, if he had any.
Originally Posted by Like.Australia
Thanks!
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I have quite a few friends who home school their children. Their main reasons for deciding to homeschool their kids was the cutting back on a lot of subjects they consider very important in the public education system. Music, more focuses on the social sciences, more in-depth education on history (rather than kind of scratching the surface on everything and moving on) and other more rudimentary subjects the younger kids are receiving now than delving deeper into these subjects.

A lot of kids are really lucky to have taken anything past geometry by the time they graduate in our state. Only 2 years of math are required for graduation. They (the home schoolers) also want their kids to develop a love for reading and comprehension of it instead of just being able to "read the books." Also grammar. Before my niece and nephew moved to Las Vegas, they were constantly praised by how many pages they read, but the teacher never cared much if they remembered what they had read. And their writing and speaking grammar was awful. When my brother and sister-in-law brought it up to the teachers, they said they taught students how to identify nouns, verbs, etc., but grammar was only covered for a small part of the week and they don't take the time to correct students because there are just too many. Not to say that every school district in our state is that way, but Utah tends to have very low nation-wide testing scores for all children.

Also, they know their children and know how they learn, so they can customize each lesson to each child's learning style. And in case there is a bad day, the kid isn't forced to conform and/or be punished for acting out because they're bored or not feeling the best in the public school system. The homeschool people I know just put the day aside, either let them focus on one subject that won't be a battle or start anew the next day.

Most of my homeschooling friend's kids are way ahead of the public school curriculum anyway, so a day off here and there isn't going to hurt them. And they are able to focus on the stuff they still consider important, give their kids a more rounded education than they might receive in our personal state due to lack of funding, cut in subject curriculum, etc.

The kids get plenty of social interaction because they are involved in sports, play with the neighbors, dancing, etc., so I have never seen the socially backward stigma I always used to associate with home schooled kids.

Then again, all of my friends agree that if their kids said they would rather attend a public school, they would absolutely let them. This is something that is supposed to be fun, not a punishment, no matter how beneficial they may think the home schooling may be. You can always help supplement to your kids learning style during homework time if they attend public school.

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I'm not trying to be offensive here.

I know we have a few homeschoolers onboard (including Poison Ivy, whom I know personally and like a lot.)

I can respect the decision to homeschool...if there is a reason to. And I'm very flexible on what those reasons could be.

But just because? And forever?

I just inteviewed a woman who homeschools her own daughter and two other elementary school age children and also runs a daycare.

I am looking for new daycare. And this woman's operation seems really great, down to her informational website, the pre-school curciculum she uses, her BS and MS degrees, how the property is outfitted, etc.

My daughter goes to public school and that is my preference. I would consider private school. But I would never consider homeschooling, unless there was some extreme extenuating circumstance which necessitated that.

I want to understand some of the logic a homeschooler uses to decide to homeschool their child for 13 yrs (to see if I would have any philosophical differences w/ it) and get some of your personal experiences w/ people who homeschool (in case they have been overwhelmingly good or bad).

This woman's daughter will be 8 next month and will be starting 3rd grade...and she does not like being homeschooled. But mom says she is farily certain she will continue to homeschool this one and the younger one all the way through high school.

My daughter would continue going to the local public school and would only spend an hour there in the afternoon.

My son would be there for during my work hours for another 1.5 yrs.

I just worry that this woman might be hard to deal with or that she might be sending some weird messages to my kids about attending public school, esp if her daughter is jealous that my daughter goes to public school (and my daughter loves school so I'm sure she will be saying positive things about school).

Or maybe this woman wil be a tremendous asset to my kids!

I asked her about her reasons for homeschooling and she said she wants to be sure her kids are learning (OK, but we live in an excellent school district and the public schools are consistently rated high, so why would she be worried about that?) and she wants God to remain in the classroom (and that's fine, too but she is Lutheran which is pretty mainline and there are tons of schools run by the Lutheran or similar church...plus parents can still raise God-loving ids and send them to public school).

Just looking for thoughts, opinions and experiences re. homeschooling.

I am interviewing other providers/centers, too, but I do like certain aspects of this one.

Yes, if I am dissatisfied I can always look elsewhere but switching daycare again is something I am really trying to avoid if possible.
Originally Posted by spiderlashes5000
I love you too Spider but I haven't homeschooled in a while!
The only couple of parents I knew that homeschooled were very conservative and religious and basically didn't want their kids being influenced by society. Personally I see it as a cruel thing to do to your children. I've met a few homeschooled kids and while I'm sure some turn out to be socially normal I wouldn't be surprised if most are not. It's also depriving them of their childhood in many ways.
I worked in the homeschool department of a curriculum company for several years during college. People had many reasons for doing so; religion was probably most common, but lots of parents did so because their children were doing poorly in public school (either failing, getting bullied, or getting expelled). We got a lot of calls from families that I personally think should NOT have been homeschooling, especially kids at the high school level. They weren't educated enough or didn't offer enough supervision. However, many states have very lenient guidelines for homeschooling and they were within their rights to do so.

Personally, I think homeschooling can be done very well. I have a friend who has homeschooled all three of her children (her two boys have graduated, and her daughter is a high school freshman).Those kids are whip smart, very involved in extra-curriculars, and not weird or anti-social in the slightest. They are seriously awesome. She's very involved in a local homeschool co-op that helps fill in the gaps with sports, field trips, etc.

I think that if a parent is dedicated to doing it right, the kids don't end up as insulated or odd socially. Personally, I'd rather not because it's very hard work to do it right, and I'm not going to be half-***ed about my kids' education. I'm not organized or disciplined enough to do a good job, so off to regular school they go!
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I homeschooled three of my kids for a few years. I did it because the older one was being mistreated by school staff and because one of the younger ones was pathologically shy and was being mistreated by fellow students.

I supplemented my kids' homeschooling with LOTS of extra-curricular activities, sports/arts/civics, so they were well-socialized. When they returned/started public school, they fit right in, both academically and socially. I was successful in breaking the momentum of the mistreatment and all was well (we also moved to a new/better district during that time).

However, most fellow homeschoolers I met during that time (and I tried several homeschooling groups) were very strange people, who were homeschooling for religious reasons. The kids were scary little religous robots, spouting fire-and-brimstone stuff.

Really...even if you are a religious person, I would stay away from homeschoolers who are doing it solely for religious purposes. They are not typical mainstream religious folks. They are radicalized fanatics.
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Well, I went to normal public school through most of my school years, but I had to be home schooled for the last year.
Since it was 1 on 1 education, rather than 1 person trying to teach 29+ kids who all sometimes have questions about what the teacher has said, you learn a lot more a lot faster.
A teacher can never ever teach each child everything, and each child will have something they don't get and never will because the class has moved on.

I think I learned more in that 1 year of 1 on 1 learning than I did in all my school years... don't get me wrong, I did ok in school, was always amongst the top 10 of the year at exam times, but I didn't learn much in school, well not as much as I could have anyway.

Home schooling or smaller class sizes are better in my opinion.
I've worked as a classroom assistant aswell, helping out kids who needed extra help, and when I worked with those kids, they didn't really need extra help, they just had questions that the teacher didn't have time to answer with such a large class to teach.

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