Do you remember your 3rd grade teacher?

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Ms. Crowe

Everyone looked forward to third grade because around valentines day she would make an entire village out of milk cartons transformed into houses complete with roads and stuff. Each kid would decorate their milk carton house to put in the village. She also had the best singing voice of all the teachers. I went to a Christian school and we sang a lot.

I don't remember much else.
hello.world.
I don't remember her name, but she was a newer teacher. Very sweet! my friends family stayed in touch with her, and she's working at a winery up in Napa now.

I live in a suburb that likes to pretend it's a small town. My first grade teacher is my neighbor, I see my middle school French teacher at trader joes all the time, and I once saw my 2nd grade teacher when I was on a date (which was all kinds of awkward.)
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Mrs. Roberts was my 3rd grade teacher. She was nice, and I liked that she had really long, straight hair that she was constantly putting up in this leather thingy that was kept in place with a chopstick like stick. She dressed a bit like a hippie, in jeans an tunic. (mid 70s.). Her creepy husband, who taught special ed at our school, would sit in our class and "observe' during his free periods. She was divorced and remarried by the time my brother had her two years later. (She cut her hair that year, too.)

Miss Bauch was my math teacher that year. She was the nicest lady ever and beautiful as well. She dressed up every day, in pretty, flowing dresses and high heels. I remember mom saying that 3rd grade was the one year all the dads wanted to go to to P/T conferences!
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What a great thread!

Ms. Goldman! She had big hair and was very sweet and nice, and would read aloud from the Wayside School is Falling Down books which were awesome.

My favorite teachers ever were in forth and fifth grade....

Forth grade, can't remember her name but I remember that she had honey-blonde hair, was really sweet, and reminded me of the good teacher in Matilda. When the Clinton-Monica thing happened she made this speech about how politicians' private lives should stay private, which made no sense to me until several years later. To teach us how to write and send letters she had us write to Santa Claus (it was Christmas time). I couldn't think of anything I wanted so lied and said I wanted a bike.....and then she actually bought me one!!! My parents said that someone left it outside our apartment (haha, yeah right) and that it must've been Santa.....oh, on the last day of school before summer break, she gave me a garbage bag full of books for the summer and told me never to stop reading/writing.

Fifth grade, she was a little...odd? But still so, so cool in my eyes. She was kind of young, very pretty, would tell weird stories about death - how her grandfather died while they were driving in the car (including details like how his bowels emptied!), how her fiance died in a plane crash and she had to identify the body.....sounds crazy but she was always so nice and encouraging to me. She used to share my essays with her boyfriend and report back with his comments, which were always that I was a good writer, and how he was waiting for me to write my book....she may have been a little odd but I loved her because I felt like she truly believed in me.

And then I moved to Florida and the quality of my teachers sank like a rock


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Mrs. Gibson. She wasn't one of my favorites. What I remember about her most was that she told me I would likely get the part of the panda (a good-size part) in the play we were doing about endangered species. When the time came to assign parts another girl was chosen to be the panda and I was given the part of a saguara cactus with only three lines.

I seethed during every rehearsal when Panda Girl couldn't remember her lines and had to be told repeatedly to speak up and be more lively.
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Mr. Cope. He was really nice. He always reminded me of Mr. Rogers because he was soft-spoken, and wore a cardigan sweater every day.
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Mrs. Starr, third grade, was my all-time favorite teacher. We moved mid-school year, and I had not yet learned cursive writing at my old school, so I felt lost when I started in her class. She worked with me after school a couple of days and got me all caught up, so that put her in good favor with me in the first place, but she was just a truly excellent old-school teacher - and she was old, too.

With her snow-white, bunned hair she seemed really ancient, but she probably wasn't nearly as old as she seemed to an 8 year old. I later had two of her daughters as teachers in high school, and they were both great, too - teaching was obviously in their blood and upbringing.

One particular memory of Mrs. Starr is of asking her if I could borrow a kleenex. She said dryly that I could have one, but she didn't want it back, LOL! She had a sort of dry, acerbic wit that a lot of kids just didn't get, but I loved it because she reminded me of my great grandma. I already loved reading, and she was one of the few adults who really enouraged that, so that further endeared her to me.
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I was in special ed at the time, so our classes weren't really broken down by grade. When I was 8 (around the age that most kids are in 3rd grade), I had Ms. Stone. She had metal glasses and red hair cut in a shag (this was in the mid 70's). I think the hair was real, not from Clairol. She was fair-not overly nice but not mean either. The following year, I had Ms. Narvaez, who was stricter than Ms. Stone. The assistant was Ms. Silverstein. They were the first teachers who recognized that I had abilities far above those of many of the other kids in the class. It was during that year that I started going to reading classes with the "regular" kids as I tested at middle school level. Ms. Silverstein did a music unit in our special ed class where we learned to play recorders but she thought I did so well that she arranged to have a "regular" kid who was in the school's band tutor me on the clarinet. I was mainstreamed out of special ed the year after that. The teacher I had then was my first male one, Mr. Heller, but he didn't make much of an impression. That year was hell because of the fact that most of the kids knew I'd been in special ed and I was a target for teasing and bullying by some of the boys and a number of the girls ignored me. The whole time, the school I had been going to had been out of my district because the district I lived in didn't have the special ed classes they thought I needed. For sixth grade, I went to the school in my district that I should have been going to all along and was placed in a "regular" class. I had Mr. Turkish, but he didn't make much of an impression either.
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We had three teachers during my 3rd grade school year. The only one I remembered was Mrs. Calling only because my mom was friends with her (she was a teacher at the same school). I like to think that the reason I never fully grasped fractions was due in part to the screwy change of teachers.

One teacher I remember in particular was in 4th grade. I don't remember her name but she was young and fun and made school enjoyable. The thing I loved the most was when she occasionally brought her basset hound to school and whoever was best behaved got to take him for a walk.
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Mrs. Wilson. I remember I liked her and that she organized an advanced reading group that I was in, which had more interesting stuff to read than the usual drivel. We had terrible classroom conditions -- due to overcrowding, we had a very large class and it was in the middle school instead of the elementary school, but she helped us not mind too much.

My favorite had to be my kindergarten teacher, Mrs. Washington. She taught for many years, and living again in the same town I grew up in, I am always meeting other people who had her for kindergarten. She would ask the kids to get their mothers to give them a yard of fabric to bring in, and she would sew covers for the back of the kids' chairs so each kid knew which chair was hers. She was so sweet.

Worst teacher -- Mrs Burbach, fourth grade. She really disliked me for no particular reason, which was a new experience for me. I was always on her wrong side no matter what. Fortunately, that year I had four childhood diseases plus a couple of other ailments, and was out of school more than in. I just did the work and tests at home, and did better than when I was in class.
I was in special ed at the time, so our classes weren't really broken down by grade. When I was 8 (around the age that most kids are in 3rd grade), I had Ms. Stone. She had metal glasses and red hair cut in a shag (this was in the mid 70's). I think the hair was real, not from Clairol. She was fair-not overly nice but not mean either. The following year, I had Ms. Narvaez, who was stricter than Ms. Stone. The assistant was Ms. Silverstein. They were the first teachers who recognized that I had abilities far above those of many of the other kids in the class. It was during that year that I started going to reading classes with the "regular" kids as I tested at middle school level. Ms. Silverstein did a music unit in our special ed class where we learned to play recorders but she thought I did so well that she arranged to have a "regular" kid who was in the school's band tutor me on the clarinet. I was mainstreamed out of special ed the year after that. The teacher I had then was my first male one, Mr. Heller, but he didn't make much of an impression. That year was hell because of the fact that most of the kids knew I'd been in special ed and I was a target for teasing and bullying by some of the boys and a number of the girls ignored me. The whole time, the school I had been going to had been out of my district because the district I lived in didn't have the special ed classes they thought I needed. For sixth grade, I went to the school in my district that I should have been going to all along and was placed in a "regular" class. I had Mr. Turkish, but he didn't make much of an impression either.
Originally Posted by LadyV69
Why were you in special ed??
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Ms. Crowe

Everyone looked forward to third grade because around valentines day she would make an entire village out of milk cartons transformed into houses complete with roads and stuff. Each kid would decorate their milk carton house to put in the village. She also had the best singing voice of all the teachers. I went to a Christian school and we sang a lot.

I don't remember much else.
Originally Posted by webjockey
I am going to borrow that idea.

I must be very lucky because I loved quite a few of my teachers.
I don't remember her name but she was a beastly dumpy woman and the only teacher that felt the need to paddle me. I don't remember why either, I just really didn't like her.

Other than her I liked most of my teachers except for 1st grade. Mrs Schumacher who was also 110 and had taught my father back in the day. Maybe she hated my dad or something I don't know. I do know she called me chicken scratch because my writing was terrible. No isht I was 6/7, stupid woman.
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Mrs. Carrabba - she loved whales and painted a huge blue whale that she hung up that extended onto two walls. She also read Charlotte's Web to us out loud in the afternoons. I don't remember much else about her.
I haven't got the slightest idea how to change people, but I still keep a long list of prospective candidates just in case I should ever figure it out.
Ms. Brazill

My 3rd grade memories:
1) Reading The Secret Garden and thinking it was the best book ever
2) Doing a string art project and being jealous of my friend because she was a good artist. I was already jealous because she wore a real bra
3) A girl Rebecca who ate her boogers and broke her leg over the summer so she got to paint during recess. I was jealous of her, too.
4) Building a city out of cardboard and construction paper
5) All the black girls making fun of me because a. my mom did not do the typical black adult hairstyles on me. French rolls with rhinestones and glitter and other ugly accessories were really popular at the time (This was Virginia in the early 90s, OK!); I still wore my hair curled in a bob or in pigtails and b. my dad was white (he isn't, but he looks it, I guess)
6) Getting metal tipped shoes banned from the school.
7) Wanting to be a hall monitor.
3c/4a
I was in special ed at the time, so our classes weren't really broken down by grade. When I was 8 (around the age that most kids are in 3rd grade), I had Ms. Stone. She had metal glasses and red hair cut in a shag (this was in the mid 70's). I think the hair was real, not from Clairol. She was fair-not overly nice but not mean either. The following year, I had Ms. Narvaez, who was stricter than Ms. Stone. The assistant was Ms. Silverstein. They were the first teachers who recognized that I had abilities far above those of many of the other kids in the class. It was during that year that I started going to reading classes with the "regular" kids as I tested at middle school level. Ms. Silverstein did a music unit in our special ed class where we learned to play recorders but she thought I did so well that she arranged to have a "regular" kid who was in the school's band tutor me on the clarinet. I was mainstreamed out of special ed the year after that. The teacher I had then was my first male one, Mr. Heller, but he didn't make much of an impression. That year was hell because of the fact that most of the kids knew I'd been in special ed and I was a target for teasing and bullying by some of the boys and a number of the girls ignored me. The whole time, the school I had been going to had been out of my district because the district I lived in didn't have the special ed classes they thought I needed. For sixth grade, I went to the school in my district that I should have been going to all along and was placed in a "regular" class. I had Mr. Turkish, but he didn't make much of an impression either.
Originally Posted by LadyV69
Why were you in special ed??
Originally Posted by spiderlashes5000
I was never told why in a direct manner. I have been told that I was speech delayed as a child, but I'm not sure if that was the reason since I started kindergarten in a regular class. My kindergarten teacher, Ms. Levin, put me there. I was shy, anxious and sensitive as a child and was easily rattled by unusually loud noise and cried practically at the drop of a hat. That teacher was a real witch who always yelled and screamed at the kids. No wonder I was so "sensitive." Personally, I don't think that woman knew how to deal with me and since I was a black child in a predominately white school, her decision may have partly been racially motivated as well. So she thought it was best to shuffle me off to special ed, where I'd be marginalized and forgotten. My parents didn't have the tools or resources to fight the decision. It took several years before some teachers in special ed figured out that perhaps I may not have really belonged there. I still partly blame Ms. Levin to this day because I feel those experiences exacerbated my shyness and eventually led to my social anxiety and depression.
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Mrs. Casella. I lived in dread every day of second grade because that meant it was one day closer to the day I had her as a teacher. She was super strict. She actually showed up to our second grad class one day to rant that she would not put up with our nonsense and called out a few students by name. I was always a good student and quiet so I didn't have any problems in her class, but I still vividly remember how she would go off on some students.

Second grade was Mrs. Hitson. One day a girl in our class said that her mother hits her too much, and she replied, "I can see why."

Fourth grade was Mrs. Forstadt (sp?). She was awesome. She had us do the best art projects and was just a great teacher overall. Such a lovely person.

Fifth was Sister Ann. Nice nun. She despaired of my handwriting.
Eres o te haces?
Second grade was Mrs. Hitson. One day a girl in our class said that her mother hits her too much, and she replied, "I can see why."
Wow...smh
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I was never told why in a direct manner. I have been told that I was speech delayed as a child, but I'm not sure if that was the reason since I started kindergarten in a regular class. My kindergarten teacher, Ms. Levin, put me there. I was shy, anxious and sensitive as a child and was easily rattled by unusually loud noise and cried practically at the drop of a hat. That teacher was a real witch who always yelled and screamed at the kids. No wonder I was so "sensitive." Personally, I don't think that woman knew how to deal with me and since I was a black child in a predominately white school, her decision may have partly been racially motivated as well. So she thought it was best to shuffle me off to special ed, where I'd be marginalized and forgotten. My parents didn't have the tools or resources to fight the decision. It took several years before some teachers in special ed figured out that perhaps I may not have really belonged there. I still partly blame Ms. Levin to this day because I feel those experiences exacerbated my shyness and eventually led to my social anxiety and depression.
Originally Posted by LadyV69
I'm sorry you had to deal with all that.
My niece had very similar symptoms and lucky for her one of her grade school teachers realized she was severely dislexic (words scooted off the page, she could barely read or write, loud noises made her cry, etc).
I don't remember this teacher's name but she was an awesome person. She let my niece do all her work orally since she couldn't read or write well. And thanks to her caring, my niece went on to be a straight A student, can now read and write well, and has a fantastic job. As shy as she was/is she still prefers to do things orally when possible and even does local theatre.
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