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Old 06-27-2012, 09:33 AM   #21
 
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Absolutely. They featured it on Serious Eats for Cook the Book and the recipes all got stellar reviews.

http://www.seriouseats.com/tags/Herbivoracious

Speaking of vegetarian, I just steamed some of these dumplings and I just can't convey how amazingly delicious they are. They're actually vegan and gluten-free, with a filling of mung beans and shallots. Doesn't sound like much, but my god are they good! The tapioca and rice flour dough is so nice and chewy. The spicy soy dipping sauce and scallion oil take them over the top. I'm already steaming up another batch since I ate the first batch in about ten seconds. It's no wonder so many people are in love with these (They're Andrea Nguyen's take on a Charles Phan recipe)!



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Old 06-27-2012, 10:04 AM   #22
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Saria View Post
Absolutely. They featured it on Serious Eats for Cook the Book and the recipes all got stellar reviews.

Serious Eats: Tags: Herbivoracious

Speaking of vegetarian, I just steamed some of these dumplings and I just can't convey how amazingly delicious they are. They're actually vegan and gluten-free, with a filling of mung beans and shallots. Doesn't sound like much, but my god are they good! The tapioca and rice flour dough is so nice and chewy. The spicy soy dipping sauce and scallion oil take them over the top. I'm already steaming up another batch since I ate the first batch in about ten seconds. It's no wonder so many people are in love with these (They're Andrea Nguyen's take on a Charles Phan recipe)!
Please post a recipe. They look amazing.
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Old 06-27-2012, 10:17 AM   #23
 
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It's here:

http://www.asiandumplingtips.com/200...-xep-chay.html

Here's a lazier take on them using store-bought wrappers:
http://www.101cookbooks.com/archives...rs-recipe.html

But honestly, they're really quick dumplings and the dough is so easy to make (requires no real resting time) and is such delightfully chewy dough that I definitely recommend making the original. The split pea for mung (also spelled moong) bean substitution is a great one if you can't get any, though!
I made the filling ahead and the sauces come together in about five minutes (I used two serrano peppers). I'm a bit more exact and use my scale to portion out the dough for 24 dumplings and the filling for 24 dumplings (a 1/4 oz of filling for each dumpling is what I got). That way I don't end up with an uneven amount of dough or filling when I get to the end.
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Old 06-27-2012, 10:25 AM   #24
 
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Thanks Saria

Since everyone in the household has some sensitivity I make everything from scratch. These look great. I think that I will make them for Friday night dinner when we usually do small plates.
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Old 06-27-2012, 10:42 AM   #25
 
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oh, i love dumplings. (although I cheat and get them from the asian grocery store. Really, I will find just about any excuse to go to the asian grocery)
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Old 06-27-2012, 10:49 AM   #26
 
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You're welcome, macluan. Hope everyone loves them even half as much as I do!
I had to steam the beans for a bit longer than called for, btw. And I salted the filling to taste (though Nguyen is usually right on the money on salt, so I may have used as much as she called for).

I love making dumplings and filled buns, but for bought, I like going to my favorite restaurants. You can get 50 or 100 frozen dumplings for really cheap and they're better than what you can get at the store.
These you won't find in a store, and they're so worth making.
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Old 06-27-2012, 11:34 AM   #27
 
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oh, this looks amazing

Pâtes aux Cêpes (Tagliatelle with Porcini Mushrooms and Crème Fraîche) | Serious Eats : Recipes

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Old 06-27-2012, 11:36 AM   #28
 
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ok, pasta one day and dumplings the next. I can do that!

Darn you Saria, now I want dumplings
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Old 06-27-2012, 11:48 AM   #29
 
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This is a great pasta (classic, delicious combo of cauliflower plus golden raisins/currants):

http://www.guardian.co.uk/lifeandsty...cchiette-clams

http://herbivoracious.com/2012/02/si...-cookbook.html

The only thing about Natkin's is that I think the cauliflower should be smaller to allow for more caramelization.

Don't forget risotto as another great vegetarian option.

And try not to focus too much on starch (pasta). Vegetable stews, gratins, stuffed vegetables, all are great options.

http://smittenkitchen.com/2011/10/cu...r-with-yogurt/

http://www.guardian.co.uk/lifeandstyle/2012/may/04/spring-salad-baked-orzo-recipes?mobile-redirect=false

http://epicurious.com/recipes/food/v...k-Sauce-365110

Epicurious doesn't know that 200 C is 400 F, though.
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Old 06-27-2012, 02:06 PM   #30
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Josephine View Post
I've never known anyone to eat fake meats..ew, I tried it once and don't understand that concept at all.

Do they eat tofu?

Indian and East Asian cuisines are my favorite for vegetarian food. Next is pasta. But my favorite pasta dishes have cheese. I like the dry ones too though.
My go-to items are potatoe pies, stuffed bell peppers, stuffed artichokes, and obviously the typical pasta type items. Have you seen the egg inside a bell pepper image going around facebook? That is pretty and would work.

For food I buy elsewhere, Josephine's items above are my ideals. I really need a spices for dummies course to learn how to make that sort of stuff on my own.

Does everyone else buy veggie stock? I really hate store bought and always make my own with veggies I can't manage to finish while still fresh or the pieces you cut off veggies (carrot stalks, for example.)

Quote:
Originally Posted by Saria View Post
Absolutely. They featured it on Serious Eats for Cook the Book and the recipes all got stellar reviews.

Serious Eats: Tags: Herbivoracious

Speaking of vegetarian, I just steamed some of these dumplings and I just can't convey how amazingly delicious they are. They're actually vegan and gluten-free, with a filling of mung beans and shallots. Doesn't sound like much, but my god are they good! The tapioca and rice flour dough is so nice and chewy. The spicy soy dipping sauce and scallion oil take them over the top. I'm already steaming up another batch since I ate the first batch in about ten seconds. It's no wonder so many people are in love with these (They're Andrea Nguyen's take on a Charles Phan recipe)!



Saria - I saw your pics on facebook and am so glad you've posted the recipe here! I just shared w/ a vegan friend asking if she's making them or I am.
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Old 06-27-2012, 02:34 PM   #31
 
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I'll add that while typical pizza is off, pizza bianca can still be made, as well as vegetable focaccia, vegetable strudels, and my favorite, vegetable galettes. Tomato tart in particular is something I love. If you don't want to make your own crust, a tomato tarte Tatin made with puff pastry is pretty great.

NetG:
http://www.seriouseats.com/2011/01/5-spices-you-need-to-start-cooking-more-indian-food.html

They also have an Indian food column and I love the Spice Hunting column. Once you get stocked up on a few spices, you can make a lot of Indian dishes.
I find Chinese (Cantonese) to be one of the easier Asian cuisines to stock, whereas Korean, Japanese, and Southeast Asian require a few more things.
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