Math or similar majors

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  • 1 Post By NetG

Hi,
I want to take a few math courses to get a teacher in math certificate,

I need to take 12 upper level courses (they start with # 3 or 4). Can someone tell me a bit about these classes? Easier harder?
This is what the college I am looking at offers. I want to take what is easier, if possible to get the certification since I am not doing the full bacherlors degree. I am taking calculus 1 right now. I already took statistics.

Required Major Courses:

MAT 20043 Discrete Mathematics
MAT 21044 Calculus I
MAT 21144 Calculus II
MAT 31044 Calculus III
MAT 22043 Linear Algebra
MAT 30243 Transition to Higher Mathematics
MAT 31143 Mathematical Statistics I
MAT 32044 Mathematical Statistics II
MAT 33043 Differential Equations
MAT 42143 Abstract Algebra
MAT 44143 Advanced Undergraduate Topic
MAT 45143 Introduction to Real Analysis
MAT 49201 Integrative Seminar in Mathematics
Teacher Licensure in Mathematics

MAT 20043 Discrete Mathematics
MAT 21044 Calculus I
MAT 21144 Calculus II
MAT 31044 Calculus III
MAT 22043 Linear Algebra
MAT 26043 College Geometry
MAT 30143 History of Mathematics
MAT 30243 Transition to Higher Mathematics
MAT 31143 Mathematical Statistics I
MAT 32044 Mathematical Statistics II
MAT 33043 Differential Equations
MAT 42143 Abstract Algebra
MAT 44143 Advanced Undergraduate Topic
MAT 45143 Introduction to Real Analysis
MAT 49201 Integrative Seminar in Mathematics
So far what has made the most sense to you?

I've taken graduate level statistics, many types of calculus (I assume one of those would be multivariable), linear algebra, diff eq, then learned more math in engineering classes.

I hate any kind of "theoretical" or "abstract" math class because the way the ones at my school were taught had no relation to the real world, where the others directly applied to my engineering work and ways to best evaluate reality. But I had friends who loved those type of classes. So it really depends on you and which prerequisite classes you would want to take.
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The pews never miss a sermon but that doesn't get them one step closer to Heaven.
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But at least the pews never attend yoga!
So far what has made the most sense to you?

I've taken graduate level statistics, many types of calculus (I assume one of those would be multivariable), linear algebra, diff eq, then learned more math in engineering classes.

I hate any kind of "theoretical" or "abstract" math class because the way the ones at my school were taught had no relation to the real world, where the others directly applied to my engineering work and ways to best evaluate reality. But I had friends who loved those type of classes. So it really depends on you and which prerequisite classes you would want to take.
Originally Posted by NetG
I adored regular algebra and trigonometry, but anything "abstract" was just too... abstract. But I had friends who loved them.

All the math "directions" start out with a lower level, so try the calculus or stats to see which you prefer and follow that path.
Minneapolis, MN
My undergrad was in Math. Most of the folks I wen to school with that was on the teacher track didn't take applied mathematics courses meant for people going into business-related professions like Actuarial.

Calc 1-4 is pretty easy. Calc 4 is basically calc 3 with an extra dimension - not that bad.

I thought Abstract Algebra and Differential Equations was fun, but mostly because I enjoyed Calculus. I would have taken the advanced course but it wasn't part of my track because I was on the Actuarial track.

The history course seems like an easy one - if you like history. I also wonder how Eurocentric the course is...
hello.world.
Stats MS here an I find all real math courses hard and boring except analysis and math theory.
3b (with 3c tendencies) on modified CG

Stats MS here an I find all real math courses hard and boring except analysis and math theory.
Originally Posted by spiderlashes5000
Which one is math theory?
So far what has made the most sense to you?

I've taken graduate level statistics, many types of calculus (I assume one of those would be multivariable), linear algebra, diff eq, then learned more math in engineering classes.

I hate any kind of "theoretical" or "abstract" math class because the way the ones at my school were taught had no relation to the real world, where the others directly applied to my engineering work and ways to best evaluate reality. But I had friends who loved those type of classes. So it really depends on you and which prerequisite classes you would want to take.
Originally Posted by NetG

They have all made sense to me so far. I've taken the algebra, calc for business, finite mathematics, precalculus, statistics and I am now taking Calculus 1.

Calculus 1 I understand but then when I do the problems, I easily spend over 30 hours working on them a week. We have to do about 65 every week for homework. The class is online so I don't have much to go by when I have questions. It is hard for me.
My undergrad was in Math. Most of the folks I wen to school with that was on the teacher track didn't take applied mathematics courses meant for people going into business-related professions like Actuarial.

Calc 1-4 is pretty easy. Calc 4 is basically calc 3 with an extra dimension - not that bad.

I thought Abstract Algebra and Differential Equations was fun, but mostly because I enjoyed Calculus. I would have taken the advanced course but it wasn't part of my track because I was on the Actuarial track.

The history course seems like an easy one - if you like history. I also wonder how Eurocentric the course is...
Originally Posted by webjockey
I am sure history of Mathematics is easy but that is the only class is not offered online. I am doing only online courses. That is my luck!!!!
Stats MS here an I find all real math courses hard and boring except analysis and math theory.
Originally Posted by spiderlashes5000
Which one is math theory?
Originally Posted by violets
Hard to tell from these names; the course descriptions will help you know which. I'm guess Advanced Topics and Advanced Algebra. Diff Eq can be theoretical.
3b (with 3c tendencies) on modified CG

My undergraduate degree is in math and I've taken several graduate math classes.

You'll have to start with the Calc sequence (I II and III), as that's a prerequisite for nearly any other math class. I didn't have a class of Transition to Higher Mathematics, but that sounds like a useful class because it probably teaches you how to write proofs, etc. I would recommend Diff Eq and the Mathematical Statistics classes. Probably the hardest class on that list is Intro to Real Analysis--it is very theoretical and consists entirely of proving theorems of calculus.

Do you have to take 12 classes that are numbered 3XXXX or higher? So Discrete, Calc I and II and Linear Algebra don't count towards the requirement?
My undergraduate degree is in math and I've taken several graduate math classes.

You'll have to start with the Calc sequence (I II and III), as that's a prerequisite for nearly any other math class. I didn't have a class of Transition to Higher Mathematics, but that sounds like a useful class because it probably teaches you how to write proofs, etc. I would recommend Diff Eq and the Mathematical Statistics classes. Probably the hardest class on that list is Intro to Real Analysis--it is very theoretical and consists entirely of proving theorems of calculus.

Do you have to take 12 classes that are numbered 3XXXX or higher? So Discrete, Calc I and II and Linear Algebra don't count towards the requirement?
Originally Posted by sarah42
That's correct. I have to take calc 1 and 2 to get the higher level courses.

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