Eggs, eggs and more eggs!

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My best friend is Guyanese and makes curried eggs, so I started too. Basically it's a simple curry (onion, garlic, curry powder(s), turmeric), spinach, chickpeas, and cut up hard boiled eggs. She serves it with roti or bake, but I make mine plain or with a little bit of rice.

If you google it, you'd find a lot of recipes.

I also just went to a restaurant and ate poached eggs and wild mushrooms over polenta. It was amazing, but at home I usually fold fresh spinach into my polenta or grits.

There is the old standby that I love - eggs over rice. My college boyfriend started me on that



Other egg dishes that come to mind are eggs in purgatory, huevos rancheros, huevos divorciados, and eggs over pasta.

Oh, and noodle bowls!

Flan. yumm
Originally Posted by Josephine
That's creme caramel. I find people too many people who hear "flan" and have a poor idea of it (mostly due to either bad store-bought versions or overbaked home versions), but are open to "creme caramel" or even "caramel custard". "Creme reinversee" nobody but the French know.

Last edited by Saria; 10-16-2012 at 09:06 AM.
Flan. yumm
Originally Posted by Josephine
That's creme caramel. I find people too many people who hear "flan" and have a poor idea of it (mostly due to either bad store-bought versions or overbaked home versions), but are open to "creme caramel" or even "caramel custard". "Creme reinversee" nobody but the French know.
Originally Posted by Saria
What are overbaked home versions? I was implying any type of flan or 'pudding' - technically this is not flan but a variation of it that is a common bengali recipe - my mom's is simple and not as heavy (I like all types) -

5 or 6 eggs
sugar (I think it was about 6 large tablespoons, but probably more)
1 can of evaporated milk

bake, love it!! I can eat more of this since it's not really heavy like flan
Most people (in the US since the word flan is used differently in countries like the UK) when you say flan think of the Spanish/Latin American dessert and many react with "I hate flan" since it's been marketed to the point where even Jello sells the stuff. But I don't find a negative reaction to "creme caramel" even though they're the same thing with a different name because it hasn't been marketed as creme caramel.
What you describe above is a baked custard, which flan is, but specifically a caramel-topped custard.
Flan really isn't particularly heavy, though. It's the lightest of the big three baked custards, in terms of richness. It's composed of mainly whole eggs and milk, versus the richer pots de creme and creme brle, which have more yolks and use cream. The use of whole eggs makes it firmer and more eggy-tasting than the others, but it still shouldn't be unpleasantly firm.
Basically custards are a tree with various branches, creme anglaise being the root. Changes in number of eggs, use of whole versus yolks, and liquid used distinguishes them.

As for overbaked, aside from curdling and splitting which happens, tiny bubbles along the sides of the custard are an indicator and I see tons of flan with those bubbles along the side. Overbaked flan is unpleasantly eggy since the eggs get that sulfurous flavor.

Anyway, I wasn't intending to be argumentative or whatever, just teasing because I'm afraid of ever suggesting flan the reaction to it is so negative sometimes. I was trying to be sneaky!

Last edited by Saria; 10-16-2012 at 10:33 AM.
Most people (in the US since the word flan is used differently in countries like the UK) when you say flan think of the Spanish/Latin American dessert and many react with "I hate flan" since it's been marketed to the point where even Jello sells the stuff. But I don't find a negative reaction to "creme caramel" even though they're the same thing with a different name because it hasn't been marketed as creme caramel.
What you describe above is a baked custard, which flan is, but specifically a caramel-topped custard.
Flan really isn't particularly heavy, though. It's the lightest of the big three baked custards, in terms of richness. It's composed of mainly whole eggs and milk, versus the richer pots de creme and creme brle, which have more yolks and use cream. The use of whole eggs makes it firmer and more eggy-tasting than the others, but it still shouldn't be unpleasantly firm.
Basically custards are a tree with various branches, creme anglaise being the root. Changes in number of eggs, use of whole versus yolks, and liquid used distinguishes them.

As for overbaked, aside from curdling and splitting which happens, tiny bubbles along the sides of the custard are an indicator and I see tons of flan with those bubbles along the side. Overbaked flan is unpleasantly eggy since the eggs get that sulfurous flavor.

Anyway, I wasn't intending to be argumentative or whatever, just teasing because I'm afraid of ever suggesting flan the reaction to it is so negative sometimes. I was trying to be sneaky!
Originally Posted by Saria
LOL I know that's fine, I just love love flan. I think of flan as spanish/latin american dessert that I can get at cuban restaurants. I dont like the jello prepackaged crap. Markets in miami usually sell a whole tub for 5 bucks and nicer srestaurants here have good enough flan for me. I find it heavy since I don't particularly like really rich sweet foods. It depends on where I get it though. Funny you say the bubbling and cracking, that's how it looked when I used make my version..I still love it.

O yea I've never heard the term creme caramel, good to know. I'm trying to post a pic from my phone but apparently some image server is down. urgh

Last edited by Josephine; 10-16-2012 at 01:20 PM.

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