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sinistral55 11-21-2012 08:09 AM

Does anyone here know how to quilt?
 
Is it hard to learn?

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Speckla 11-21-2012 08:17 AM

I do. By hand and by sewing machine. It isn't hard to learn. I bought some quilting books and some cheap fabric and practiced. It does take practice to be able to cut and make the more intricate pieces lie flat but it's still fun to do. An attic window is my favorite design.

Double Attic Windows Quilt Pattern Leaflet w/ Flexible Templates on eBay!

sinistral55 11-21-2012 09:14 AM

Thanks......did you teach yourself totally?

I always wanted to make one by hand. Or partially by machine, or something.

Preferably something simple enough without having to buy or learn the charts and graphs and tools.

I'd like to try a class one day, if I ever get financially straight again...

Can you tell me more, for example the types of stitches (if there are more than one type of stitch) you use, etc?

Once you make the top part, do you stuff the quilt with some sort of filling? I have no idea but it looks like some are stuffed/filled?

Some of the log cabin designs look easy.



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Speckla 11-21-2012 02:48 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by sinistral55 (Post 2074114)
Thanks......did you teach yourself totally?

I always wanted to make one by hand. Or partially by machine, or something.

Preferably something simple enough without having to buy or learn the charts and graphs and tools.

I'd like to try a class one day, if I ever get financially straight again...

Can you tell me more, for example the types of stitches (if there are more than one type of stitch) you use, etc?

Once you make the top part, do you stuff the quilt with some sort of filling? I have no idea but it looks like some are stuffed/filled?

Some of the log cabin designs look easy.



Sent from my SPH-M580 using Tapatalk 2

I like to do blanket stitches or just plain old straight stitching. It's really very easy to do. I taught myself through reading quilting magazines and just cutting different shapes and making my own designs or looking at other quilts and trying to figure themm out.

A quilt has 3 layers. The top layer is your fabric design, the middle is batten (it's made of the same material as stuffing but it's a long sheet of material) and the bottom layer.

I like to use old sheets or blankets as the bottom layer. It's an easy way to make sure you get the right size and shape you are aiming for.

I like quilting by hand better because it looks better to me than just machine sewing with all clean, perfect lines. It's the little oddities or mistakes that can give a quilt it's charm. It's also nice to quilt on a chilly night 'cause you get to cover your lap with the quilt as you're making it.

Speckla 11-21-2012 02:51 PM

The quilting comes in when you're stitching the three layers together. You can do a straight stitch and make patterns or even tie knots to keep everything in place.

Quilting Techniques

Log cabins quilts are made from the attic window pattern. I love, love them!

Yeah, I totally taught myself. I start quilting when I was 22 and didn't know anyone my age at that time that quilted or sewed. Quilting, making clothes, knitting, crochetting, embroidery are just a few of my favorite things...
:)

sinistral55 11-21-2012 03:10 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Speckla (Post 2074302)
The quilting comes in when you're stitching the three layers together. You can do a straight stitch and make patterns or even tie knots to keep everything in place.

Quilting Techniques

Log cabins quilts are made from the attic window pattern. I love, love them!

Yeah, I totally taught myself. I start quilting when I was 22 and didn't know anyone my age at that time that quilted or sewed. Quilting, making clothes, knitting, crochetting, embroidery are just a few of my favorite things...
:)

Wow, now I want to make one really, really bad *sigh*

Where do you get the fabric scraps for your blocks?

Yes I can do all the aforementioned also, with my least favorite being sewing clothes. I was hoping quilting could be a good 'sewing' type hobby for me. I'd also like to get back into counted cross stitch.

I wish my grandma would've taught me how to quilt. We had a really good news article in our local paper about African-American quilters and the history of quilting in the AA community. I feel like I missed out on a part of my history.....nobody told me about her quilting nor her wide knowledge of herbs and local plants until after she passed.

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Speckla 11-21-2012 03:24 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by sinistral55 (Post 2074316)
Quote:

Originally Posted by Speckla (Post 2074302)
The quilting comes in when you're stitching the three layers together. You can do a straight stitch and make patterns or even tie knots to keep everything in place.

Quilting Techniques

Log cabins quilts are made from the attic window pattern. I love, love them!

Yeah, I totally taught myself. I start quilting when I was 22 and didn't know anyone my age at that time that quilted or sewed. Quilting, making clothes, knitting, crochetting, embroidery are just a few of my favorite things...
:)

Wow, now I want to make one really, really bad *sigh*

Where do you get the fabric scraps for your blocks?

Yes I can do all the aforementioned also, with my least favorite being sewing clothes. I was hoping quilting could be a good 'sewing' type hobby for me. I'd also like to get back into counted cross stitch.

I wish my grandma would've taught me how to quilt. We had a really good news article in our local paper about African-American quilters and the history of quilting in the AA community. I feel like I missed out on a part of my history.....nobody told me about her quilting nor her wide knowledge of herbs and local plants until after she passed.

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I get most of my favorite from Walmart but any hobby store sound carry some. I also shop thrift stores for old clothing with interesting patterns or use some of my old clothes that are too worn out to donate.

sariroo 11-21-2012 04:00 PM

I quilt but only machine quilting like freemotioning. I don't have patience or time to do it by hand. I taught myself from a quilting magazine I picked up at Joann Fabrics. I just followed a pattern my first time and there were instructions for beginners with all of the terms and stuff. It turned out okay. The second one I made was cute but also just okay as some stitching was off and seams didn't match up that great. The quilts that I made after those two were much better because I learned a lot from my mistakes. To start off, you really should get a basic quilting ruler, a cutting mat, and a rotary cutter. They have a learning curve also but will be much more accurate cuts than scissors. You can usually get this stuff on sale at Joann's or Hobby Lobby with a coupon.

sariroo 11-21-2012 04:38 PM

I have way more to say on this topic but today is Thanksgiving for me so I'm making my child's birthday cake and baking pies and turkey. I'll be back later!

sariroo 11-21-2012 09:42 PM

1 Attachment(s)
Attachment 27431

This is a picture of the second quilt I made. It was for a friend's baby. It was made from a pattern in a quilting magazine also. I don't have a picture of the first quilt I made but it was very basic with blocks and strips. It was not pretty but I was still a beginning sewer as I really didn't sew much (other than sewing patches and rank on my husband's uniform) from the time I learned to sew at 8 years old until I was 25 which was when I rediscovered how much I liked sewing and decided to start quilting. However, at that time, I really didn't realize the importance of accurate cutting or lining up your pieces when sewing seams and making a very exact 1/4" seam. But I have definitely improved. I'm at the point where I can follow a pattern or make my own. I have sewn quite a few quilts now. I have quite a few sewing machines at my disposal but used a very basic Kenmore to make the first one and now I only free motion quilt with an old Singer machine. I love using the old machines. Between my mom and I, we have quite a collection.

If you are interested in learning, I would start with a local shop or if they featured a quilting group or individual person in the article you mentioned, see if you can't find and get in touch with someone that way. I would even approach it from the angle of the importance to the AA community and getting in touch with some history which you seem to want to do. I would definitely think someone would help you out.

Also, Speckla has a great idea with old bedsheets. I know you thrift shop because you have posted previously about doing it and by thrifting, you can usually find some interesting old pieces very cheaply and cut them up for the front or use for sheeting for the back of the quilt. No sense buying some really expensive fabric to learn on. However, don't go so cheap that it is hard to work with. A cheap 100% cotton, prewashed before cutting and piecing would be fine. I use Warm and Natural batting for my quilts because I like the thin, flat look of quilts and it is very easy to quilt. This is expensive but lasts very well, can be purchased on sale (or with a coupon at Joann's or Hobby Lobby), and can be preshrunk or sewn with as is and then shrinks slightly in the was to give the quilt the slightly wrinkly texture of an old quilt. I will try to find more pictures of my quilts. I love to sew, love to talk about it, and love to show it off. I have never had a friend in real life that cared about sewing at all. But it is something my mom and I share and I hope I can pass it on to my daughter.

Speckla 11-21-2012 09:47 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by sariroo (Post 2074344)
I quilt but only machine quilting like freemotioning. I don't have patience or time to do it by hand. I taught myself from a quilting magazine I picked up at Joann Fabrics. I just followed a pattern my first time and there were instructions for beginners with all of the terms and stuff. It turned out okay. The second one I made was cute but also just okay as some stitching was off and seams didn't match up that great. The quilts that I made after those two were much better because I learned a lot from my mistakes. To start off, you really should get a basic quilting ruler, a cutting mat, and a rotary cutter. They have a learning curve also but will be much more accurate cuts than scissors. You can usually get this stuff on sale at Joann's or Hobby Lobby with a coupon.

I was coming back to suggest those. Rotary cutters are amazing and save so much cutting time. I bought a large cardboard sheet for cutting quilt pieces on and laying them out when putting together a pattern. I was less than $10 and a clear quilting ruler that's a little bigger than a yardstick and is about 6" wide.

sinistral55 11-22-2012 08:19 AM

WOW!!!

--That quilt is so beautiful!! Does anyone else have an example of their work?

--I have ALWAYS wanted a quilt for my bed. When I'm looking at bedding in catalogs/etc., I'm always sighing over the quilt-style bedspreads and comforters.

And I just remembered---one of the clinics I worked at had quilts displayed as decor instead of paintings. No matter where I was, I constantly found myself checking out those quilts. Some were quite old but others were newer.....they were incredible to look at. I can't believe that making my own is an actual possibility!!!


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sinistral55 11-22-2012 08:24 AM

A few more questions--

Do any of you use special thread? How about needles (if hand-sewing)

Do you use a hoop or quilting frame?

When I get able to start doing something, the first thing I'm doing is checking out the sewing/craft supplies at the thrift stores.

What is freemotion?

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sariroo 11-22-2012 01:40 PM

Freemotioning is when you sew in a meandering way all over the quilt with a machine. You don't need a frame or hoop to do it. There is a learning curve to it. I will find a picture for you.

sariroo 11-22-2012 01:56 PM

1 Attachment(s)
Here is what freemotioning looks like close up. This is the 4th quilt I made. This is the first one that I was really proud of because while there are a few mistakes, unless you are a quilt judge or something, you wouldn't know.

SunshineGrrl 11-23-2012 12:24 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by sariroo (Post 2074759)
Here is what freemotioning looks like close up. This is the 4th quilt I made. This is the first one that I was really proud of because while there are a few mistakes, unless you are a quilt judge or something, you wouldn't know.

Those are the cutest fabric squares EVER!

Ahem...I will try to compose myself here. My "family" has always been quilters. They came from very old school (my Grandma was a child of The Great Depression) and so you didn't have blankets or store bought blankets or quilts. Our were ALWAYS homemade quilts. And we loved those things. Wore them until the fabric fell apart and still used it!

I don't quilt because I just don't have the patience. I go ape-isht if I have to sit at a sewing machine and make everything precise with the exact seam...it drives me bonkers. I did, however, dink around a bit with the form patterns that are in like a heavy cardstock and you sew the material around it in a quick whipstitch, then join the edges together with a more lasting stitch. That was pretty fun. I think the pattern I tried was Grandmother's Garden or something like that.

The quilts in our family often aren't super intricate. When we were young, my siblings and myself usually got plain square patchwork quilts with some fun fabric my Grandma had found. And they weren't truly quilted, they were tied off (holding the three layers of material together with yarn knots...hope that's kind of explanatory enough). No use quilting something when kids are going to drag them everywhere and be really rough on them.

Now, my mom owns a long-arm quilter, so if we can motivate her enough, we can get quilts made pretty often. Again, for me, my quilts usually consist of the softest flannel I can find along with the cutest material I can find. I will sew it together to the measurements I need and the back will usually also be the softest flannel I can find and more solid. Because I'm just too lazy to even attempt any kind of quilt pattern.

Now...what I would recommend is looking at either your local community rec classes and see if they have a quilting class OR if you have a Senior Center (I guess this is more prominent in smaller towns where the Senior Citizens can all go down and have a social time), I know Senior Centers all around here who have a specific time where they'll just gather together and either quilt a communal quilt or do their own quilt piecing. They can be crotchety, but really willing to help you learn if you find the right person and they usually have tons of experience with piecing tops, then quilting them. And you get to hear lots of hilarious stories of when they were young and the antics they would get into if you can get them going. Hilarious!

Gretchen 11-23-2012 04:06 PM

Y'all are so talented!

Myradella3 11-23-2012 09:15 PM

I quilt. I don't make large bed quilts. I do wall hangings and baby quilts. I piece by machine and usually quilt by machine but I have hand tied some.

A couple of websites:
Quilting - Quilt Patterns - Learn How to Make Quilts

The Quilter's Cache - Marcia Hohn's free quilt patterns!

If your town has a store just for quilt fabric, check there for a guild which is a group of quilters many of whom will be happy to help you learn.

Good luck

Speckla 11-23-2012 09:37 PM

I will have to dig out my son's old baby blanket. It was the first quilt I ever made.

SunshineGrrl 11-24-2012 12:55 PM

Oh, I was going to paste a picture of what kind of quilt I should be getting soon, but found this website and think it might be fun for you to look around in and maybe learn something! Just glancing at it made quilting make a lot more sense to me! And I've been watching quilting (well piecing and the actual quilting) since I was small enough to run under the old fashioned quilting frames...you know, the 1x4 boards propped up on the corner with pedestals quilting frames. They took up the whole room! Ooohhhh, that link was even a quilter's message board! Score!

Here are some more pictures of the old quilting frames, though one looks like they're just tying off the quilt judging by the skein of yarn in the middle of the quilt.
http://farm2.staticflickr.com/1180/4...164d49b2_z.jpg

And...

http://farm5.staticflickr.com/4034/4...c02fbbe74a.jpg

This is ultimately what I asked for Christmas last year. This year, I might Actually see it. It's not exactly like this picture, because my mom has broken it up into a kind of patchwork quilt by breaking up the strips with a slightly different color. It's made with Minky and will be reversible! One side has the strips going one way, the other side has them going the other. I'm so stoked to finally get it!

http://www.shannonfabrics.com/images...ight-Quilt.jpg


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