It's all about the dough!

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Well aren't you turning into the perfect little Amish milk maiden!
thelio likes this.
3b (with 3c tendencies) on modified CG

Well aren't you turning into the perfect little Amish milk maiden!
Originally Posted by spiderlashes5000
ZOMG!!! My co-worker just told me I should become Amish!!!
This thread title is misleading! I mean, there is strained yogurt "cheese" (which is what Greek yogurt and labne essentially are), but I thought this was going to be about ricotta, or mascarpone, or mozzarella. YOU LIED TO ME THELIO!

You can make ricotta in as little as five minutes.
Sour cream and creme fraiche are also really easy.
Mascarpone is easy and cheaper than store-bought.
Quark is another great cheese to make at home and so useful.
Homemade cottage cheese is much better than what you can get in a supermarket!

Make sure to never use ultra-pasteurized milk when making cheese.
And leftover whey is great for bread.
Sorry Saria. The recipe i used was called: "kefir cheese".

not time i will post about real cheese thanks to CC's link. I have never heard of quark? how is there a cheese I have never heard of?

I will stay away from ultra pateurized milk. Ohhh whey bread!!
Ha, I was just kidding, thelio! I should have noted it!
Quark is a German cheese (and other parts of Europe). It's used a lot in German recipes. Cheesecake, breads, cakes, you'll find Quark in a bunch of them.
Ha, I was just kidding, thelio! I should have noted it!
Quark is a German cheese (and other parts of Europe). It's used a lot in German recipes. Cheesecake, breads, cakes, you'll find Quark in a bunch of them.
Originally Posted by Saria
No prob!! I know how serious you are about food.

Is these good recipes for cheese:

How to Make Quark Cheese | The Peanut Butter Boy

Homemade Mascarpone Cheese Recipe - Food.com - 446790
Those are both good.
Here is another for quark:
http://www.whatsforlunchhoney.net/20...rk-recipe.html

She uses quark A LOT if you find yourself wanting ideas for what to do with it.

You really must make ricotta though!
The five minute way:
http://www.seriouseats.com/2010/02/h...-food-lab.html

More traditional way:
http://www.seriouseats.com/2012/06/h...ta-cheese.html

Varying degrees of cream make for ultra-creamy ricotta, but making it with just milk is delicious!
thelio likes this.
Those are both good.
Here is another for quark:
What's For Lunch Honey? | Experience Your Senses: Quark: The Recipe

She uses quark A LOT if you find yourself wanting ideas for what to do with it.

You really must make ricotta though!
The five minute way:
The Food Lab: Fresh Ricotta in Five Minutes or Less | Serious Eats

More traditional way:
The Homemade Pantry's Ricotta Cheese | Serious Eats

Varying degrees of cream make for ultra-creamy ricotta, but making it with just milk is delicious!
Originally Posted by Saria
I will never buy ricotta again!!!
grrrr!!! the five min ricotta was a bust!!! it didnt curdle like it was suppose to!! boo!!! i am savign the whey to make bread this weekend.

i'm getting the things i need to make the mozerralla today and if i get off of work in time i will take a stab at it.

and these are the honey rolls i made.
Attached Thumbnails
It's all about the dough!-rolls.jpg  
Curlyminx likes this.
Did you use whole pasteurized milk and heat it to 165 degrees? I've had no issues with it. You can always try the traditional method, though.
Do you have rennet for mozzarella?
I read real mozzerella comes from a water buffalo. Was I lied to?
3b (with 3c tendencies) on modified CG

Did you use whole pasteurized milk and heat it to 165 degrees? I've had no issues with it. You can always try the traditional method, though.
Do you have rennet for mozzarella?
Originally Posted by Saria
I checked and double checked! it was whole pasteurized milk and i heated it to 165. i'm also picking up a new thermometer just incase it was off. its kinda old.

I'm picking up the rennet after work.
I read real mozzerella comes from a water buffalo. Was I lied to?
Originally Posted by spiderlashes5000
there's cow and buffalo mozzeralla.
There are different types of mozzarella. It's not just mozzarella di bufala. There's mozzarella fior de latte for one, which is cow's milk. Mozzarella di bufala has a DOP status. That doesn't mean it's "real" and other mozzarella is "fake", though.
murrrcat and thelio like this.
Did you use whole pasteurized milk and heat it to 165 degrees? I've had no issues with it. You can always try the traditional method, though.
Do you have rennet for mozzarella?
Originally Posted by Saria
I checked and double checked! it was whole pasteurized milk and i heated it to 165. i'm also picking up a new thermometer just incase it was off. its kinda old.

I'm picking up the rennet after work.
Originally Posted by thelio
You can just check that your thermometer is calibrated. It should read 212 if you put it in boiling water and 32 in ice water. And you also have to make sure to wait some 15 seconds to make sure the reading is accurate. You'd rather go over the 165 than under. You can go as high as 190. His settling on 165 came from finding there wasn't much difference in results from 165 to 185.
But try the traditional method just to get a feel for it some time. Here is another version that uses yogurt and lemon juice, which is a bit unusual since most so either lemon juice/vinegar or yogurt/buttermilk but not both:
http://www.simplyrecipes.com/recipes...icotta_cheese/

Last edited by Saria; 03-12-2013 at 08:33 AM.
I'm goign to try the tradition method until i get the hang of it.

does the heavy cream make it creamer? would you recommend it?
The heavy cream makes for a creamier result. We used to get Salvatore ricotta at one of my jobs and it was a delicious ultra-creamy ricotta. It was great for spreading on crostini or for desserts. Or eating by the spoonful. Ricotta made with no cream will produce results more like Calabro ricotta. Larger curds, kind of chewier, which I mean in a good way because that type is delicious, too, and sometimes I don't want super creamy mouthfeel.
The first recipe I linked has cream in it and you could actually tweak it to have even more cream if you wanted. As much as 3:1 milk to cream.

Deb tried to emulate the Salvatore stuff:
http://smittenkitchen.com/blog/2011/06/rich-homemade-ricotta/

I don't agree with her about ricotta just made with milk, though. It's definitely worth making and eating.
thelio likes this.

Last edited by Saria; 03-12-2013 at 08:50 AM.
Can't wait to hear how the mozzarella turns out!
maria_i likes this.
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so the ricotta cheese i said had failed?? Well, apparently it didnt!

The direction said it was suppose to seperat into curdles and whey. but it didnt. i was going to throw it away, but my sister insisted i try to strain it to see what happens. when i got home from work yesterday, guess what i saw?!!?

THIS:
Attached Thumbnails
It's all about the dough!-cheese.jpg  

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