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Old 03-08-2013, 01:41 PM   #1
 
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Default green beans

What are they? I know they are legumes, but you don't, or I don't, eat them as dried beans after they've been rehydrated. Do they have similar nutrients as "leafy greens"?

My kids eat lots of veggies but my turtle has gotten pickier with age. However, if I steam frozen green beans Nutmeg will eat them! But she turns her snout up at any leafy greens now, cooked or otherwise. I cannot find anything about green beans being good, bad or ugly for turtles and was just wondering about how they are classified and their nutritional values.
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Old 03-08-2013, 01:52 PM   #2
 
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Here you go. Google to the rescue.
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Old 03-08-2013, 02:04 PM   #3
 
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Is it a box turtle?

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Seventy to eighty percent (70% - 80%) of the plant based portion should be vegetable. Good vegetables to feed include dark leafy greens (collard greens, mustard, turnip, beet tops, kale, spinach, romaine lettuce, swiss chard and dandelions), sweet potatoes, yellow squash, zucchini, carrots, thawed frozen mixed vegetables, alfalfa, tomatoes, mushrooms, bell peppers, broccoli, green beans and peas. Box turtles continuously need Vitamin A. Foods rich in Vitamin A are liver, yellow or orange colored vegetables and dark leafy greens. Feed spinach and beets in moderation because they tie up calcium. Rhubarb leaves are toxic and should not be fed. Some extra additions that are safe would include cantaloupe berries and some edible flowers - hibiscus, geraniums and nasturtiums.
http://www.cpvh.com/2011/07/24/box-turtles/

It seems like, while green beans are okay, the turtle also needs a constant source of Vit. A. If he won't the eat dark leafy greens, try some of the other suggestions like steamed carrots or squash or liver.
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Old 03-08-2013, 02:04 PM   #4
 
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Here you go. Google to the rescue.
I've never seen that site! Thank you!

I compared green beans to spinach and beans won for Nutmeg's diet!!! Yay! Lower calories, still really high nutrients!!!
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Old 03-08-2013, 02:44 PM   #5
 
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This is a chart for bearded dragons, but it does have a good breakdown of nutrients. Untitled Document

IME the best way to repair a poor diet is to giv e them a salad that is mostly what they will eat, with a small amount of what you want them to eat, then gradually increase the ratio. Color and shapes are important to them. Reptiles are more likely to try a food that in some way looks similar (color or shape) to one they like. bright colors are very appealing, as are a variety of colors offered at once.


BTW, have you tried the spring salad mix? Many reptiles love it.
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Old 03-08-2013, 03:37 PM   #6
 
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Originally Posted by CurlyCurlies View Post
Is it a box turtle?

Quote:
Seventy to eighty percent (70% - 80%) of the plant based portion should be vegetable. Good vegetables to feed include dark leafy greens (collard greens, mustard, turnip, beet tops, kale, spinach, romaine lettuce, swiss chard and dandelions), sweet potatoes, yellow squash, zucchini, carrots, thawed frozen mixed vegetables, alfalfa, tomatoes, mushrooms, bell peppers, broccoli, green beans and peas. Box turtles continuously need Vitamin A. Foods rich in Vitamin A are liver, yellow or orange colored vegetables and dark leafy greens. Feed spinach and beets in moderation because they tie up calcium. Rhubarb leaves are toxic and should not be fed. Some extra additions that are safe would include cantaloupe berries and some edible flowers - hibiscus, geraniums and nasturtiums.
Box Turtles - Claws & Paws Veterinary Hospital

It seems like, while green beans are okay, the turtle also needs a constant source of Vit. A. If he won't the eat dark leafy greens, try some of the other suggestions like steamed carrots or squash or liver.
Nutmeg is a yellow eared slider. She gets vitamin A in her "burgers". I make her burgers that are the lowest fat ground beef you can buy mixed with sweet potates or carrots and kale along with turtle vitamins. The burgers are about 60% meat, 40% veggies but the next batch will be 50/50. They started off totally meat because she got to where she hated veggies. All veggies and fruits, hated them. So I convinced her to eat hamburger with vitamins in it and then started upping the veggie ratio. I start with a pound of raw ground beef and add in steamed sweet potatoes and steamed shredded carrots and some leafy greens that are cooked. I make quarter sized burgers; individually wrap them and store them in the freezer labeled "TURTLE BURGERS FOR NUTMEG!" I pull them out one at a time and nuke them so they are warmly cooked, but not crunchy and she loves them.

I feed her green beans first, burger later. Then she is offered "treats" of whatever veggies and fruits we're having for dinner. She loves the outer leaves of brussel sprouts.

She will not eat prepared turtle foods at all. She loves crickets but they are nutritionally void so you have to feed them whatever you want her to eat. It's called gut loading (nasty). Crickets STINK and I only use them as a last resort. She gets feeder fish also. In the spring and summer, she also gets the stray grasshopper or earthworm I can find.

When she goes for walks, when the weather is warm, she hunts. She will pack her mouth (yes, like a hampster!) with whatever she can catch, mostly grasshoppers and worms. Then I put her in a container of water and she spits them all out and then eats them one at a time. Since she's a true aquatic turtle, she has to be submerged to swallow. This weekend, it's supposed to get up to 65. If it's not windy, we will go for a walk in direct sunlight. I am crossing my fingers!!!

cympreni - I will try that salad mix! Thanks!
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Old 03-08-2013, 03:48 PM   #7
 
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Slider Turtle

Care Sheet for looking after your Yellow-bellied Slider Turtle

These are the 2 websites Nutmeg's vet likes but they aren't highly informative, imo. Nutmeg is mostly a carnivore by nature. I know she used to eat a lot more veggies than she has in the last several years. She's an older turtle now and I am trying to figure out how to make the best diet for her. But if she won't eat it at all, it won't do her any good.

Oh, she also gets fishy treats - like canned salmon with the bones crushed into the meat. What's funny is Nutmeg does NOT like tuna. She has very particular tastes!!!
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Old 03-08-2013, 04:09 PM   #8
 
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I found two forums for turtles that might be a good source of information.

Portal - Turtle Forum

Tortoise Forum Index - Tortoise Husbandry Community - Tortoise Care, Tortoise Photos, Reptile Classifieds
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Old 03-08-2013, 06:14 PM   #9
 
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Thank you!!
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Old 03-08-2013, 11:59 PM   #10
 
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there is so much contradictory information in tortoises (I have 2 CA desert tortoises) and I imagine the same is true in turtles. a lot of veggies like spinach, mustard greens, etc have to be be used carefully because they contain oxalates which interferes with nutrient absorption. i've had my tortoises for 10 yrs or so and I'm still unsure what I should be feeding all the time. I tend to use a large variety of safe foods and add small amounts of foods that should be limited. Lettuce even romaine dont contain a lot of nutrients so they dont get a lot of it. I use a lot of broccoli, cauliflower, green beans, carrots, some apple, sprinkling of cabbage, zucchini, etc. I'm considering growing my own mix of plants they would eat in the wild in containers. Had no idea my dogs would be so much easier.
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Old 03-09-2013, 12:00 AM   #11
 
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Thanks for the site! Always looking for new/more info for my CA desert tortoises.
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