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Old 04-01-2013, 05:57 PM   #41
 
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I'm not that intense about it. If I notice I seem to have an issue everytime I eat yogurt, I think, maybe I shouldn't eat yogurt anymore. If it does the same w cheese I'll think, hey, maybe its dairy. If then I read an article that says people with brown hair have issues with dairy I'll say, that sounds like me! Maybe I'll stop eating dairy and see if that changes anything. And I'll stop. If I like the results, cool find. If nothing changes, I'll probably start eating cheese again.

I don't need a team of scientists to prove how my eating habits should or should not be. I can trial and error myself. This isn't like proving the existence of God or anything. Its choosing to eat differently. Or not. Its an individual thing.

Scientific evidence is totally important when talking about vaccination on whole populations of people. Whether BPA in cans can cause cancer. The safety of radiation in cell phones. Deciding to cut gluten out of my diet bc it may cause bloating is not that involved to me.


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Old 04-01-2013, 07:19 PM   #42
 
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So the complaint of *****iness and snark has nothing to do with what was posted in THIS thread?

O...kay.

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No it was. You were snarky. I'm not your mom so I'm not going to cut and paste it for you. I imagine you're enough of a big girl to find snark yourself.

(That was it, by the way)


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Well, since you're so fixated on age as proof of...something, maybe you can pretend? (See, THAT was snark! I'm never subtle about it.) If you're referring to my first post, in which I was talking about the author of the book...well, that obviously wasn't directed at you, since I clearly stated who I was referring to. But sorry if I struck a nerve and you got defensive.

P.S. That's not what "ironic" mean. [/snark]
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Old 04-01-2013, 07:32 PM   #43
 
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So the complaint of *****iness and snark has nothing to do with what was posted in THIS thread?

O...kay.

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No it was. You were snarky. I'm not your mom so I'm not going to cut and paste it for you. I imagine you're enough of a big girl to find snark yourself.

(That was it, by the way)


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Well, since you're so fixated on age as proof of...something, maybe you can pretend? (See, THAT was snark! I'm never subtle about it.) If you're referring to my first post, in which I was talking about the author of the book...well, that obviously wasn't directed at you, since I clearly stated who I was referring to. But sorry if I struck a nerve and you got defensive.

P.S. That's not what "ironic" mean. [/snark]

I didn't pay attention to the book or its author, so if I missed the direction of your snark, I apologize for taking it out on you. I do get heated at times. I'm not offended by my age. If you'd like me to mother you, I think I have some work ahead of me.


P.P.S. I didn't use that term
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Old 04-02-2013, 04:04 AM   #44
 
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‘Ah, Mr. Lawson Particle,’ cried the Count, ‘welcome to Castle Dracula. Dinner is in half an hour if you would care to change. We can leave business until tomorrow. Travolta will show you to your room. Tell me, what blood type are you?’
‘A.’
‘I said “what blood type are you?”’
‘O,’ I said, ‘B.’

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Old 04-02-2013, 07:30 AM   #45
 
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Too bad you're not As.

My blood type A says:
Since your body can easily break down and get optimal nutrition from grains, carbs and proteins, cereal, breads and pastas should be staples of your diet.



Actually, I don't think a blood type diet is scientifically supported, so I say, eat what you want.
Okay, even though I faint when I have blood taken, I've decided I'm an A, so I can justify eating what I crave. Thanks for the info!
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Old 04-03-2013, 03:44 AM   #46
 
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I'm am "o". I love meat. I think that's about right. . unless things have changed. I ain't read da article. O.o
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Old 04-03-2013, 10:41 AM   #47
 
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Traits: Leader
Eat: Meat
Avoid: wheat, dairy, beans and Cruciferous veggies

Yeah, I'm all about this. Lo-Carb diets work for me because I am a meat eater.


As for the snark, I see both sides, but really, I think we all know this article reads a little like a horoscope and we all know to take it with a grain of salt, even the OP. I don't think Iroc was trying to psuh this as gospel, just sharing. I also see why someone would want to post their opinion/research.

No need for the over the top comments.
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Old 04-03-2013, 11:31 AM   #48
 
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It seems to me that each year it changes what we should or shouldn't eat/drink. Coffee is bad for you then coffee is good for you, etc. Whole grains are really being pushed right now. I, personally, think it's for the farmers to make more money from their grain crops and has nothing to do with our own health. I think dairy gets pushed for the same reasons. (got milk?) We are being manipulated or at least the powers that be try to.

As far as this particular diet...it is one of many. Diet books sell like hot cakes.

Just a little rant....
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Old 04-03-2013, 12:44 PM   #49
 
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Farmers who sell whole grains aren't exactly big business. They're usually smaller farms and mills who are trying to revive culinary traditions. Whole grains aren't new. They were around long before more processed grains became staples and were abandoned by people who preferred convenience and more amenable texture.

But to take it further, to say that whole grains being pushed is for the sake of profit is kind of really white-centric. Grains like quinoa (which technically not a grain in the true sense of the word), millet, amaranth, and teff have been regularly consumed by different cultures for far longer than any whole grain "trend" has been around.

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Amaranth was a staple of Aztec culture, until Cortez, in an effort to destroy that civilization, decreed that anyone growing the crop would be put to death. Seeds were smuggled out to Asia, where local dialects referred to Amaranth as "king seed" and "seed sent by God" as a tribute to its taste and sustenance. Amaranth kernels are tiny; when cooked they resemble brown caviar. Amaranth is a "pseudo-grain" – like quinoa and buckwheat, it's not in the Poaceae botanical family, but is listed with other grains because its nutritional profile and uses are similar to "true" cereal grains.

Today amaranth is making its way back, thanks to a lively, peppery taste and a higher level of protein (it's roughly 13-14% protein) compared to most other grains. In South America, it is often sold on the streets, popped like corn. Amaranth has no gluten, so it must be mixed with wheat to make leavened breads. It is popular in cereals, breads, muffins, crackers and pancakes.
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Amaranth grain has a long and colorful history in Mexico and is considered a native crop in Peru. It was a major food crop of the Aztecs, and some have estimated amaranth was domesticated between 6,000 and 8,000 years ago. Annual grain tributes of amaranth to the Aztec emperor were roughly equal to corn tributes. The Aztecs didn’t just grow and eat amaranth, they also used the grains as part of their religious practices. Many ceremonies would include the creation of a deity’s image that had been made from a combination of amaranth grains and honey. Once formed, the images were worshipped before being broken into pieces and distributed for people to eat. When Cortez and his Spaniards landed in the New World in the sixteenth century, they immediately began fervent and often forceful attempts to convert the Aztecs to Christianity. One of their first moves? Outlaw foods involved in “heathen” festivals and religious ceremonies, amaranth included. Although severe punishment was handed to anyone found growing or possessing amaranth, complete eradication of this culturally important, fast-growing, and very prevalent plant proved to be impossible.
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This tiny size, in fact, makes teff ideally suited to semi-nomadic life in areas of Ethiopia and Eritrea where it has long thrived. (The photo to the left shows teff being harvested in Ethiopia.) A handful of teff is enough to sow a typical field, and it cooks quickly, using less fuel than other foods. Teff also thrives in both waterlogged soils and during droughts, making it a dependable staple wherever it’s grown. No matter what the weather, teff crops will likely survive, as they are also relatively free of plant diseases compared to other cereal crops.
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Before rice was widely consumed in Asia, it’s thought that different forms of millet were the staple grain in this region, as long ago as 8300 B.C.E. Millet’s legacy persists in the Chinese language, where the signs for “millet” and “mouth” together make the word “harmony” and contribute to the word for “peace.” Evidence indicates that millets spread to the Black Sea area by 5000 B.C.E.

Today, millet is the world’s sixth most important grain. India is the world’s largest producer of millet, with eight African countries and China making up the rest of the top ten producers. Depending on variety, millets can grow anywhere from one to 15 feet tall, and usually have a very hard, undigestible hull that must be removed before the grain can be eaten. Most millets do best in dry, warm climates.
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Sacred to the Incas, quinoa was referred to by them as chisaya mama, or the mother of all grains. Legend has it that each year, the Incan emperor would sow the first quinoa seeds, with much solemn ceremony. Although it's estimated that Bolivians in the Lake Titicaca area began to cultivate quinoa at least five thousand years ago, quinoa came close to disappearing after 1532. That's when Francisco Pizarro, the Spanish explorer, destroyed the quinoa fields to undermine the Incan culture, built as it was on ceremonies that almost all involved quinoa. Only small pockets of wild quinoa at high altitudes survived, and quinoa was largely forgotten until its "rediscovery" by the outside world in the 1970s.
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Quinoa is known as an "ancient grain," but to most scientific researchers, it's a new kid on the block. While the existing research on quinoa pales next to well-studied grains like oats or barley, the pace of quinoa research is picking up, and presenting some intriguing preliminary data.

So, long before white people caught on about the benefits of whole grains, people around the world were aware of both the health benefits and the goodness of whole grains and indeed many are intrinsically tied to these cultures.
And as for quinoa, first white people destroyed the crops, now white people have led to it becoming so pricey that the people who have been eating it forever can't even afford it. White people ruining everything.
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Old 04-03-2013, 12:45 PM   #50
 
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I haven't had my blood tested in a long time but I'm pretty sure I was type p.
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Old 04-03-2013, 12:48 PM   #51
 
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I haven't had my blood tested in a long time but I'm pretty sure I was type p.
I assume you mean pizza, but first my mind went to a very dirty place.

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Old 04-03-2013, 12:49 PM   #52
 
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It seems to me that each year it changes what we should or shouldn't eat/drink. Coffee is bad for you then coffee is good for you, etc. Whole grains are really being pushed right now. I, personally, think it's for the farmers to make more money from their grain crops and has nothing to do with our own health. I think dairy gets pushed for the same reasons. (got milk?) We are being manipulated or at least the powers that be try to.

As far as this particular diet...it is one of many. Diet books sell like hot cakes.

Just a little rant....

Yeah, ag lobbies are very powerful and the advertising agencies they hire are good at what they do.
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Old 04-03-2013, 12:52 PM   #53
 
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actually pie.


chocolate pie.


my heart is made out of pizza.
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Old 04-03-2013, 12:54 PM   #54
 
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The world on the idea that you didn't mean 'Pizza'
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Old 04-03-2013, 01:15 PM   #55
 
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The first signal to me that this diet plan is BS was when they attributed personality traits to blood types. No wonder Dedachan refers to it as the blood horoscope. The description for type O is the exact opposite of me. I'm introverted, have low energy and lack focus, due to ADD.

That being said, if you tried eating the things they recommend and you feel better doing so, keep going. My own personal theory for why people have success is that when we focus on limiting certain foods or ingredients, we tend to (consciously or subconsciously) eat "cleaner." That in and of itself is going to be healthier than eating highly processed food.
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Old 04-03-2013, 02:17 PM   #56
 
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The first signal to me that this diet plan is BS was when they attributed personality traits to blood types. No wonder Dedachan refers to it as the blood horoscope. The description for type O is the exact opposite of me. I'm introverted, have low energy and lack focus, due to ADD.

That being said, if you tried eating the things they recommend and you feel better doing so, keep going. My own personal theory for why people have success is that when we focus on limiting certain foods or ingredients, we tend to (consciously or subconsciously) eat "cleaner." That in and of itself is going to be healthier than eating highly processed food.
When I started reading and they went into personality types I was like, oh? Hmmm. - but other than the first time I read the article, I pretty much skipped past that part.


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Old 04-03-2013, 02:36 PM   #57
 
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Saria, I'm aware grains have been around a very long time. I'm talking about them being pushed at us. You may not see it that way, but I do, but maybe that's because I'm white.
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Old 04-03-2013, 02:37 PM   #58
 
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*snort*

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Old 04-03-2013, 02:55 PM   #59
 
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Saria, I'm aware grains have been around a very long time. I'm talking about them being pushed at us. You may not see it that way, but I do, but maybe that's because I'm white.
Except the point was that there's only a "push" if you are coming from a purely white-centric standpoint since people around the world have been eating whole grains all this time. It's not a push so much as catching on to what other people have been doing and a revival of culinary traditions. So maybe it's more about actual benefits than some special interests from groups that really don't make enough of a profit to influence what people are told to eat anyway.
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Old 04-03-2013, 02:57 PM   #60
 
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Saria, I'm aware grains have been around a very long time. I'm talking about them being pushed at us. You may not see it that way, but I do, but maybe that's because I'm white.
Except the point was that there's only a "push" if you are coming from a purely white-centric standpoint since people around the world have been eating whole grains all this time. It's not a push so much as catching on to what other people have been doing and a revival of culinary traditions. So maybe it's more about actual benefits than some special interests from groups that really don't make enough of a profit to influence what people are told to eat anyway.
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