Cooking Quinoa and recipes

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How the hell do you cook this stuff?

Mine is still coming out soggy. Halp!
Fat does not make you fat. It's actually pretty important.
If you find it soggy using the typical method of 2:1 (I've only had it be an issue if the pot was too small and there wasn't enough evaporation), try cooking it in ample water, like pasta. It makes nice fluffy quinoa.
But otherwise I like pilaf style or cooking it like porridge.
Cool. Thanks. I seem to have had some success today. It's not as soggy as normal but still a bit crunchy. It needs sons seasoning or something though.
Fat does not make you fat. It's actually pretty important.
The little tails should basically be out when it's done. If they're not it will be too crunchy. Here is Lorna Sass' basic method (she's written a lot on whole grains):

http://www.indiadivine.org/showthrea...s-Basic-Quinoa
Some looked like tadpoles and some didn't.

I will check out that link.
Fat does not make you fat. It's actually pretty important.
I always rinse quinoa thoroughly before cooking...otherwise it tastes a bit like dirt.

As a savory main or side dish, I like to cook it in bouillon or stock (chicken/beef/fish) instead of plain water. I love it mixed with mushrooms and bits of carmelized onions and carrots. Peas go well mixed with it too. Any vegetable really. Scrambled eggs too. I make a breakfast-savory-dinner thing with it...quinoa, scrambled eggs, fried bacon, mushrooms, green onions.

I've added it to soups of all kinds for extra texture.

It's also good cooked as a breakfast porridge and eaten with sugar and cinnamon and butter. As with oatmeal or other grains, a beaten egg whisked into the simmering quinoa porridge just before serving makes it creamy and adds extra protein. Cooked with raisins will make the raisins "plump" and delicious.

Go wild. It's a versatile grain that can take experimentation. I don't follow recipes myself, so I can't really share any. I mostly cook by the seat of my pants.
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Last edited by RedCatWaves; 04-02-2013 at 01:56 PM.
I like to add in cup of vanilla almond milk in place of some of the water to make it sweeter. I usually top it with a generous shake of cinnamon, too.

When I have fresh fruit or nuts in the house, I add those in as well.
I just got an email from eatingwell with a bunch of quinoa recipes, and I actually printed out three of them to make this week/weekend

link

I like the above suggestions!


I find that quinoa takes extra seasoning/flavor compared to pasta or some other grains, so I always make sure I use plenty. I'm especially interested to try RCW's recipe because that sounds tasty!
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So that's why it tasted like dirt.

I'll rinse it better next time. Most of it went through the colander so I just chucked it in the pan.

All your ideas sound yummy
Fat does not make you fat. It's actually pretty important.
Quinoa is coated with saponin, so yes, you need to put it in a fine strainer and rinse well or it will taste like soap. I find most of the quinoa I get these days needs just one single rinse though.

Lorna Sass has a paella made with quinoa which looks really great.
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I need to get a finer sieve then. I meant sieve before, not colander -duh. I meant to say it went through the sieve.
Fat does not make you fat. It's actually pretty important.
The first time I had quinoa it was hot with milk, sugar and butter. Yum.
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Last edited by The New Black; 04-03-2013 at 08:36 AM.
Mmmm quinoa... I eat it nearly every day!

I love it with poached eggs, sauteed tomatoes and onions with some avocado.

I also mix it with a bit of garlic infused oil, Italian seasoning, sliced black olives, roasted cherry tomatoes, artichoke hearts, feta, plus a little s & p.

It's great with blue cheese, dried cranberries, walnuts with a little garlic oil.
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I have a packet sat in the cupboard doing nothing as I can't seem to get it right either. Last time I tried it was really gluggy and left a weird aftertaste, don't think I washed it at all though.
Really want to try a sweet recipe.
3b in South Australia.
cookingquinoa.net emails me recipes. I love this stuff! When I use it in chicken soup instead of rice or noodles, my son calls it tadpole soup

Here's a recipe I want to try: Black Bean Quinoa Spaghetti - Cooking Quinoa
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I have a packet sat in the cupboard doing nothing as I can't seem to get it right either. Last time I tried it was really gluggy and left a weird aftertaste, don't think I washed it at all though.
Really want to try a sweet recipe.
Originally Posted by Starmie
http://www.notquitenigella.com/2010/...thful-sundays/

I prefer to cook my quinoa in all water and finish with heavy cream in this one. I add heavy cream when the quinoa is just about done, let it warm up and thicken a little, then spoon a touch more when I have a serving. I also salt it of course:
http://www.101cookbooks.com/archives...oa-recipe.html

In truth I prefer grains like millet, oats, amaranth, and bulgur to quinoa. I think texturally they're a bit more interesting and I also like the flavor more The biggest draw with quinoa is that it's a complete protein, which other grains can't boast. Amaranth is close to being a complete protein, though.
And teff is no slouch:

Teff leads all the grains – by a wide margin – in its calcium content, with a cup of cooked teff offering 123 mg, about the same amount of calcium as in a half-cup of cooked spinach. It’s also an excellent source of vitamin C, a nutrient not commonly found in grains.

Teff was long believed to be high in iron, but more recent tests have shown that its iron content comes from soil mixed with the grain after it’s been threshed on the ground – the grain itself is not unusually high in iron.

Teff is, however, high in resistant starch, a newly-discovered type of dietary fiber that can benefit blood-sugar management, weight control, and colon health. It’s estimated that 20-40% of the carbohydrates in teff are resistant starches. A gluten-free grain with a mild flavor, teff is a healthy and versatile ingredient for many gluten-free products.

Since teff’s bran and germ make up a large percentage of the tiny grain, and it’s too small to process, teff is always eaten in its whole form. It’s been estimated that Ethiopians get about two-thirds of their dietary protein from teff. Many of Ethiopia’s famed long-distance runners attribute their energy and health to teff.
I guess I'm an oddball, but I'm really not a fan of quinoa. Perhaps I just suck at cooking it, but there was really nothing about it that I found redeeming Maybe I should have another go at it?
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I guess I'm an oddball, but I'm really not a fan of quinoa. Perhaps I just suck at cooking it, but there was really nothing about it that I found redeeming Maybe I should have another go at it?
Originally Posted by VTmom
Ha, see my post above. I mean it's okay, and I like it well enough, but other whole grains are tastier to me, with quinoa's main draw being its nutritional makeup.
I do like it in baked goods for the crunch it provides, though.
VTmom likes this.
Thanks for the links Saria - that first recipe had me at 'condensed milk'!

I want to like it for the nutrition too, I don't eat meat so like to look out for protein sources.
3b in South Australia.

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