Genealogy tests from ancestry.com

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An anthropologist came to my college and said that my jawline shows I come from mongols. Can you say Attila the Hun?

Very unscientific but I liked it, bloodthirsty that I am.

TNB I'm certain that your 4% uncertain is a tres classy gene!
Originally Posted by curlypearl
Haha. Omg. Isn't it strange when that happens. I have had countless doctors and dentist call me "Classic Eastern European" based on the structure of my face, complexion, and some medical oddities over the years. I am unaware of any Eastern European heritage, but according to many, I've got a great deal of it.

ETA: A wonderful family from India who recently moved here, and opened a business, even asked me if I was European. Lol. It struck me as an odd question. I told them I knew of English/Scottish/Irish heritage and the husband said NO! I'm not sure what else he said though. We have a bit of a language barrier, but we try our hardest to understand each other

Perhaps I do, and perhaps that's where my papaw comes in. With someone in his family being adopted it's hard to trace, but several of us think he comes from travelers or gypsies. Perhaps it's Romanian as opposed to Irish travelers. I would like to find out, but I doubt I will have the testing done.
curlypearl likes this.
When I hear terms like "hipster" I think, who told cliques they could leave high school??


Last edited by Fifi.G; 06-23-2013 at 10:05 AM.
Now I really want to have this done. Haha. I've been looking on different ancestry forums, and seen that several people from my area have had this done. They are most prominently British Isles and also have a large percentage of Scandinavian. Some have Southern European, and Cherokee, after the trip to America. I am currently most interested in the factors before crossing the pond. For quite some time people have said many of us were the Scottish Highlanders, while others argued we were the lowlanders. The main differences between them were the Highlanders spoke Gaelic until some were forced to learn English. Highlanders also had a good percentage or Norse blood. ETA: Side note on that. I always found the argument that Scots-Irish were not Irish to be silly. How do you think the Old Irish language spread in the Highlands? Did no one have sex then? They "intermingled".

Anywho, the whole thing has been rather confusing because of cover up's and re writes. The Highlanders were cleared from there land, on more than one occasion. Some were moved to the low lands, some were forced into indentured servitude, some places themselves in it to flee the hard times, and some came later on their own. Most were then driven out of town after town because they didn't fit into proper society. The clan (think ancient celt, not the other bleepers) mentality, grouping of communities, and ways were not understood. They settled in a place which looked like home. This has always made sense to me given the way people in my area cling to their culture for dear life, and revolted against government interference. It also makes sense when it comes to our dialect. *As far as I know most of my family could not read or write in English when they came here, If they could t was minimal. They signed with an X or made their mark* So to all the "academics" who have argued otherwise... Suck it.
When I hear terms like "hipster" I think, who told cliques they could leave high school??


Last edited by Fifi.G; 07-28-2013 at 12:19 PM.
I would LOVE to have this done!! So much to learn about Jennifer.
FroZen
I would LOVE to have this done!! So much to learn about Jennifer.
Originally Posted by BlackAngelPlayah
It would be interesting. It doesn't tell the whole story (which nothing ever will, especially if you rely more on oral history), but answers some questions. I have fun researching this stuff the hard way, too. It's cool to map out linguistics, names, and see which theories seem to apply to you more.
When I hear terms like "hipster" I think, who told cliques they could leave high school??

Now I really want to have this done. Haha. I've been looking on different ancestry forums, and seen that several people from my area have had this done. They are most prominently British Isles and also have a large percentage of Scandinavian. Some have Southern European, and Cherokee, after the trip to America. I am currently most interested in the factors before crossing the pond. For quite some time people have said many of us were the Scottish Highlanders, while others argued we were the lowlanders. The main differences between them were the Highlanders spoke Gaelic until some were forced to learn English. Highlanders also had a good percentage or Norse blood. ETA: Side note on that. I always found the argument that Scots-Irish were not Irish to be silly. How do you think the Old Irish language spread in the Highlands? Did no one have sex then? They "intermingled".

Anywho, the whole thing has been rather confusing because of cover up's and re writes. The Highlanders were cleared from there land, on more than one occasion. Some were moved to the low lands, some were forced into indentured servitude, some places themselves in it to flee the hard times, and some came later on their own. Most were then driven out of town after town because they didn't fit into proper society. The clan (think ancient celt, not the other bleepers) mentality, grouping of communities, and ways were not understood. They settled in a place which looked like home. This has always made sense to me given the way people in my area cling to their culture for dear life, and revolted against government interference. It also makes sense when it comes to our dialect. *As far as I know most of my family could not read or write in English when they came here, If they could t was minimal. They signed with an X or made their mark* So to all the "academics" who have argued otherwise... Suck it.
Originally Posted by Fifi.G
Not sure about the language spreading in Scotland, but the Scots-Irish were Scots who were transplanted to Northern Ireland and were mainly Protestant to assist in the Plantation of Ulster and then later to escape famine They later then migrated to the US. They only started calling themselves the Scots-Irish after the potato famine to distinguish themselves from the masses of Catholic Irish coming into the country. So yes the argument is quite silly because they are Irish, they just wanted to separate themselves from the Catholic Irish. It's also a mainly American term.
Anyway, given your research you probably know all this. I just wrote a paper on the Scots-Irish influence on democracy in America so I had to dork out for a moment.

I want to get it done just to see if family stories match up with the results. I also want to see where my dad's side gets it's coloring. They are darker with tight curly hair and high foreheads. The men anyway, all the girls are pale with very curly hair.
roseannadana likes this.
Now I really want to have this done. Haha. I've been looking on different ancestry forums, and seen that several people from my area have had this done. They are most prominently British Isles and also have a large percentage of Scandinavian. Some have Southern European, and Cherokee, after the trip to America. I am currently most interested in the factors before crossing the pond. For quite some time people have said many of us were the Scottish Highlanders, while others argued we were the lowlanders. The main differences between them were the Highlanders spoke Gaelic until some were forced to learn English. Highlanders also had a good percentage or Norse blood. ETA: Side note on that. I always found the argument that Scots-Irish were not Irish to be silly. How do you think the Old Irish language spread in the Highlands? Did no one have sex then? They "intermingled".

Anywho, the whole thing has been rather confusing because of cover up's and re writes. The Highlanders were cleared from there land, on more than one occasion. Some were moved to the low lands, some were forced into indentured servitude, some places themselves in it to flee the hard times, and some came later on their own. Most were then driven out of town after town because they didn't fit into proper society. The clan (think ancient celt, not the other bleepers) mentality, grouping of communities, and ways were not understood. They settled in a place which looked like home. This has always made sense to me given the way people in my area cling to their culture for dear life, and revolted against government interference. It also makes sense when it comes to our dialect. *As far as I know most of my family could not read or write in English when they came here, If they could t was minimal. They signed with an X or made their mark* So to all the "academics" who have argued otherwise... Suck it.
Originally Posted by Fifi.G
Not sure about the language spreading in Scotland, but the Scots-Irish were Scots who were transplanted to Northern Ireland and were mainly Protestant to assist in the Plantation of Ulster and then later to escape famine They later then migrated to the US. They only started calling themselves the Scots-Irish after the potato famine to distinguish themselves from the masses of Catholic Irish coming into the country. So yes the argument is quite silly because they are Irish, they just wanted to separate themselves from the Catholic Irish. It's also a mainly American term.
Anyway, given your research you probably know all this. I just wrote a paper on the Scots-Irish influence on democracy in America so I had to dork out for a moment.

I want to get it done just to see if family stories match up with the results. I also want to see where my dad's side gets it's coloring. They are darker with tight curly hair and high foreheads. The men anyway, all the girls are pale with very curly hair.
Originally Posted by KookyCurl
I have read up on the Plantation of Ulster 15-1600's and also the drive of people out of the Scottish Highlands to clear the land and put sheep on it which started in the 1700's (a statue was put up in honor of those who would have never left home, and there are some good documentaries). They were burned out of their homes and moved to land not fit for the sheep, which is currently sporting grounds for the elite. Some believed to be taken by force in each situation, and then came the potato famine. The second was not talked about for some time, and each depends on when your family came over and what their experience was.

Plus you get into the tricky... You're not Irish... When some of my family came from Ireland. Some from The Highlands. Etc. There is more than one family member.

When researching my county I see the number of people given land grants were few and far between. I know that was a staple of those who sided with the English during the POU. It seems like heads of those family came from Virginia to this area. Most of your settlers came from different directions, and worked to buy land when they could. And yes, Scots-Irish is mainly an American term used to distinguish during immigration.
When I hear terms like "hipster" I think, who told cliques they could leave high school??


Last edited by Fifi.G; 07-30-2013 at 08:36 AM.
I've still got some reading up to do on the earliest forms of ethnic cleansing. I did come from the savage, non English speaking, Gales. As far as I know I come from the group that was displaced the first time but not completely relocated as planned, moved to land that no one else would inhabit, and then ran off that land. Viking raids or some Gales given to the Swedish Army at one point can explain the Scandinavian in the blood of many here. The Lowland, English speakers did not have this trait. ** That is a very important distinction for me right now because it goes more with my families oral tradition, which has been said to be a lie by many in academics, when speaking of the people in my area. That seemed to happen to a few different groups here.
When I hear terms like "hipster" I think, who told cliques they could leave high school??


Last edited by Fifi.G; 07-30-2013 at 09:15 AM.
A convo with my dad about getting him to take the DNA test:

Me: So, dad, you know I took one of those tests to tell you about your ancestors, right?
Dad: Yeah...
Me: I want you to take a test too.
Dad: A press?
Me: No. A test. You know it's a test kit that comes in a box for you to find out where you come from.
Dad: A tick?!
Me: No, a box of stuff to find out about your ancestors.
Dad: And you can't find anyone else to do it but me?
Me: Dad! I've only got two parents. You and mom...
Dad: Then get your mother to do it...
Me: I need you both to do it for the full picture.
Dad: Oh alright... Here's your mother. Talk to her....

lol...Talking is tough with deaf, elderly people by phone about technology that's new and suspect to them.
mrspoppers and curlypearl like this.
No MAS.

I am the new Black.

"Hope the Mail are saving space tomorrow for Samantha Brick's reaction piece on the reactions to her piece about the reactions to her piece." ~ Tweet reposted by Rou.

http://www.youtube.com/user/Kimshi4242

http://www.tumblr.com/blog/kimshi4242
^ hahah. That is adorable (and adorably frustrating).
When I hear terms like "hipster" I think, who told cliques they could leave high school??

Now I really want to have this done. Haha. I've been looking on different ancestry forums, and seen that several people from my area have had this done. They are most prominently British Isles and also have a large percentage of Scandinavian. Some have Southern European, and Cherokee, after the trip to America. I am currently most interested in the factors before crossing the pond. For quite some time people have said many of us were the Scottish Highlanders, while others argued we were the lowlanders. The main differences between them were the Highlanders spoke Gaelic until some were forced to learn English. Highlanders also had a good percentage or Norse blood. ETA: Side note on that. I always found the argument that Scots-Irish were not Irish to be silly. How do you think the Old Irish language spread in the Highlands? Did no one have sex then? They "intermingled".

Anywho, the whole thing has been rather confusing because of cover up's and re writes. The Highlanders were cleared from there land, on more than one occasion. Some were moved to the low lands, some were forced into indentured servitude, some places themselves in it to flee the hard times, and some came later on their own. Most were then driven out of town after town because they didn't fit into proper society. The clan (think ancient celt, not the other bleepers) mentality, grouping of communities, and ways were not understood. They settled in a place which looked like home. This has always made sense to me given the way people in my area cling to their culture for dear life, and revolted against government interference. It also makes sense when it comes to our dialect. *As far as I know most of my family could not read or write in English when they came here, If they could t was minimal. They signed with an X or made their mark* So to all the "academics" who have argued otherwise... Suck it.
Originally Posted by Fifi.G
Not sure about the language spreading in Scotland, but the Scots-Irish were Scots who were transplanted to Northern Ireland and were mainly Protestant to assist in the Plantation of Ulster and then later to escape famine They later then migrated to the US. They only started calling themselves the Scots-Irish after the potato famine to distinguish themselves from the masses of Catholic Irish coming into the country. So yes the argument is quite silly because they are Irish, they just wanted to separate themselves from the Catholic Irish. It's also a mainly American term.
Anyway, given your research you probably know all this. I just wrote a paper on the Scots-Irish influence on democracy in America so I had to dork out for a moment.

I want to get it done just to see if family stories match up with the results. I also want to see where my dad's side gets it's coloring. They are darker with tight curly hair and high foreheads. The men anyway, all the girls are pale with very curly hair.
Originally Posted by KookyCurl
Another thing to look at, just to help with your own research, is the number of Irish that went to Scotland in the 6th century. The Highlanders are referred to as "The Cousins" in several writings. Do not expect the truth from standard texts. It is well noted that past was changed, in several instances, for text books and instructions in school. Writing a paper is one thing, but (in some situations) if you really want to find the answers you have to look at dates, listen to oral history, and follow your heart. It can get kind of messy when deciphering Scot & Irish family history.

I tracked my paternal grandmothers relatives to the former Monteith District in Perthshire Scotland. They were part of the clearance, while my dads fathers family was part of the many Northern Irish struggles. Same with my moms family, except hers is mainly Scots, as opposed to Scots-Irish, with many more interesting travels added to the mix.

PS- Dark hair and features are incredibly common in Ireland and Scotland.
When I hear terms like "hipster" I think, who told cliques they could leave high school??


Last edited by Fifi.G; 07-31-2013 at 04:54 PM.
PSS- Make all my Gales... Gaels.

Blessed iPhone taking about high winds, which is fitting too.
When I hear terms like "hipster" I think, who told cliques they could leave high school??

This seems like it would be an interesting thing to do.

I've always wondered about my ancestry because it came to light recently that my mum is only a half-sibling in a generation of 8 kids, through a different dad. Both my mum and I are a lot paler than the rest of the family, and we think my granddad's genes might have something to do with it. Both of my grandparents died long before I was born and family records are very much hearsay and details passed around by word of mouth are sketchy at best, so there are massive gaps in the family tree I've tried to put together.

To do a genealogy test would be a massive thing to cross off my bucket list, I'll have to be tested once I've got the moolah fund it
Come drop by my blog and say hi!


British Curly!
My first cousin just had a test done on my his moms (my moms sisters) side of the family. I'm a mutt

Scottish & Irish and a sprinkle of Welsh have the highest percentage (no surprise & score one for the boy from Liverpool) followed by Scandinavian (Finnish/Swedish), Russian (score one for the doctors), German, Central Asian and Native American.

The test my cousin had gave specific names of Rivers, which I am going to have to check out. My mom has it all scribbled down.

***ETA*** Volga-Ural were specific names of areas/rivers given.
When I hear terms like "hipster" I think, who told cliques they could leave high school??


Last edited by Fifi.G; 08-06-2013 at 08:55 PM.
In case anyone is interested (because I did see results similar to my cousins with a few of you), here are 2 interesting articles about the Asian-Native American connection. I've looked into this a few times, due to the interesting studies of the Lumbee's in my state, which recently led to my discovery of the term Melungeons. Lumbee's have claimed, through oral history, that they are descended from the Lost Colony, but DNA results showed little to mostly no native american ancestry. They show more African lineage, which is no surprise to them. Some have claimed Mulengons and Lumbee's are the same, but the Mulengons show more Native American/Asian lineage, with some showing a Sub Saharan African more like Lumbee. Both the studies are rather interesting.

http://www.upenn.edu/pennnews/news/p...tive-americans

http://geocurrents.info/place/russia...tai-connection

I would love to know the DNA breakdown on my cousins fathers side as well. He is close to full blood Cherokee.
When I hear terms like "hipster" I think, who told cliques they could leave high school??

In case anyone is interested (because I did see results similar to my cousins with a few of you), here are 2 interesting articles about the Asian-Native American connection. I've looked into this a few times, due to the interesting studies of the Lumbee's in my state, which recently led to my discovery of the term Melungeons. Lumbee's have claimed, through oral history, that they are descended from the Lost Colony, but DNA results showed little to mostly no native american ancestry. They show more African lineage, which is no surprise to them. Some have claimed Mulengons and Lumbee's are the same, but the Mulengons show more Native American/Asian lineage, with some showing a Sub Saharan African more like Lumbee. Both the studies are rather interesting.

Penn News | Penn Anthropologists Clarify Link Between Asians and Early Native Americans

Siberian Genetics, Native Americans, and the Altai Connection | GeoCurrents

I would love to know the DNA breakdown on my cousins fathers side as well. He is close to full blood Cherokee.
Originally Posted by Fifi.G
The whole Lumbee/Melungeon thing has intrigued me for a long time. Ava Gardner was supposedly Melungeon and Heather Locklear is said to have some Lumbee.
No MAS.

I am the new Black.

"Hope the Mail are saving space tomorrow for Samantha Brick's reaction piece on the reactions to her piece about the reactions to her piece." ~ Tweet reposted by Rou.

http://www.youtube.com/user/Kimshi4242

http://www.tumblr.com/blog/kimshi4242
In case anyone is interested (because I did see results similar to my cousins with a few of you), here are 2 interesting articles about the Asian-Native American connection. I've looked into this a few times, due to the interesting studies of the Lumbee's in my state, which recently led to my discovery of the term Melungeons. Lumbee's have claimed, through oral history, that they are descended from the Lost Colony, but DNA results showed little to mostly no native american ancestry. They show more African lineage, which is no surprise to them. Some have claimed Mulengons and Lumbee's are the same, but the Mulengons show more Native American/Asian lineage, with some showing a Sub Saharan African more like Lumbee. Both the studies are rather interesting.

Penn News | Penn Anthropologists Clarify Link Between Asians and Early Native Americans

Siberian Genetics, Native Americans, and the Altai Connection | GeoCurrents

I would love to know the DNA breakdown on my cousins fathers side as well. He is close to full blood Cherokee.
Originally Posted by Fifi.G
The whole Lumbee/Melungeon thing has intrigued me for a long time. Ava Gardner was supposedly Melungeon and Heather Locklear is said to have some Lumbee.
Originally Posted by The New Black
It has me, too. I was not even aware of The Melungeons until recently. It is a term I have never heard used in the mountains of NC. I had always heard of Lumbee's and had dated a Lumbee from Lumberton Great guy, and super good looking with his 6'5" frame, olive skin, darker freckles, and really curly hair. I recently found my great grandmother (my moms, dad's, mom) surname is part of the core Melungeon family. Pretty cool. I have slowly been reading more and more articles on their DNA project as well.
When I hear terms like "hipster" I think, who told cliques they could leave high school??

Side note: Dating a Lumbee was an interesting experience. I didn't think twice about it, but my Cherokee friends and family did. The tomahawks came out in the great battle of who is Native, and who isn't. "HE'S LUMBEE!!" grrrrrr. Smh, and simmer down. It's a very touchy subject, in some NC circles.
When I hear terms like "hipster" I think, who told cliques they could leave high school??

I always figured Natives would be pretty accepting, but they can be as racist, so to speak, as anyone else.
No MAS.

I am the new Black.

"Hope the Mail are saving space tomorrow for Samantha Brick's reaction piece on the reactions to her piece about the reactions to her piece." ~ Tweet reposted by Rou.

http://www.youtube.com/user/Kimshi4242

http://www.tumblr.com/blog/kimshi4242
I always figured Natives would be pretty accepting, but they can be as racist, so to speak, as anyone else.
Originally Posted by The New Black
The majority are, and it's really not racist per se. Not in the sense of having anything against a particular ethnicity. It's being protective over oral history and heritage. Everyone has different theories and beliefs on the matter, and NC has been the center of the Lost Colony debate. There are a ton of theories on the disappearance alone. I personally don't find it too far of a stretch to think the people integrated with a tribe.

** And we had many tribes in the state, and several different rivalries between them (if history is correct).
When I hear terms like "hipster" I think, who told cliques they could leave high school??


Last edited by Fifi.G; 08-07-2013 at 03:38 PM.
You know, I guess that's more of a human thing. I recently read articles on different feuds between clans in Ireland. Someone was making a documentary on it, but it has been going on for years, and years. It would often be over heritage. They would beat the bejebus out of each other, and they often were family.
When I hear terms like "hipster" I think, who told cliques they could leave high school??

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