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Old 09-14-2013, 08:01 AM   #21
 
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Speaking of names, I think it's also important to consider the country your child is going to be raised in and realistically give your child a name that is at least 'pronounceable' and won't make his/her life a living hell.
I second this but at the same time, I don't know why nobody ever gets the pronunciation of my name right. It's not that difficult or that ethnic. I also once had a tattoo artist say that my name (first and middle) sounded like a stripper's.

Anyways, reading this I automatically thought of this website:

The Utah Baby Namer


Mormons give their kids some pretty funny names and I actually found my name on here so I don't know what that says about me. I wonder if any Utah Mormons have a hard time finding a job should they venture out of state.

Oh and Freakonomics is such a great book. There's also a fantastic film and podcast people might want to check out.
I have only looked at the A's & B's in girl names so far, but there are some rather unusual ones. Some are rather pretty, but I would mad if my parents named me Apathy.


People shouldn't be refused jobs, etc, based on their given name. You can't help what your parents named you. I have still found some ridiculous over the years. I know there has been a thread or two about unusual names here. My 7th grade teacher once taught a boy names Harry Nipples. Why on earth would his parents do that? With that said, I see no point in acting like it's something only specific people do. It's universal.

At one point hospitals could refuse to put names on birth certificates, if found too different or unusual. My mom's middle name is Darcus, which I love and it is a family name, but they asked her parents to put a different name on her bc. They had to, but her father/family still called her Darcus.
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Old 09-14-2013, 08:19 AM   #22
 
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I do think "black " names have double standards, but not every black person likes "black" names. I think its silly to judge someone by their name because they did not name themselves. I feel my name is very common, I have met many people with the same name black and white. "Alexis". My younger sister on the other hand, who I named (first and middle) is usually expected to be white because of her name, which I think is silly in itself. In most of her modeling try outs, they are usually surprised they she is a dark skinned black girl with beautiful long hair. They always ask if it's "all hers", but they do not question the caucasian girls long hair. Sometimes they say her name twice to make sure they have the right person. I think its ridiculous, I named her Brittney.
As far as names that are considered "black" i don't see anything wrong with them, although I like names like Naomi, Ethan, Elizabeth, Anastasia, Alejandra etc. It doesn't have anything to do with race, i like the way they sound.
Some of my friends have "typically black" names, and they hate them. I think its sad we live in a world were people hate their own names because they are constantly judged on something they had no control over.
Regardless of race, I thinking it's all in the generational trend. I'm first generation American (both parents from Italy) but do not speak Italian because in that era, the immigrant philosophy was to "leave your culture behind and assimilate to where you are going." That has had a trickle down effect with naming kids. My parent's era gave their kids the Americanized version of names whereas today's parents are going more the ethic route, such as Stefano instead of Steven or Giuseppe instead of Joseph. I can think of hundreds of examples but that's just a couple.
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Old 09-14-2013, 11:57 AM   #23
 
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This is always an interesting conversation. Mostly because I don't think people realize their privilege in labeling which names are "weird" and which are "acceptable." When you think about it, most names sound weird but we don't label them as such because they are rooted in some sort of meaning and we are used to hearing them. I mean, is there a huge difference in the sounds between Alicia/Alisha and Talisha, for example? Not really.

My name, Layali, is pronounced like Layli and is a derivative from the word meaning night in arabic. Another more "acceptable" version of my name is Layla. You won't believe how many people have asked me if my parents made my name up. Nope.

I always cringe when people play "the-weird-name-I-heard-lately" game. It always smacks of labeling someone as "other," because in most cases that person is an "other" (celebrities, not included, of course).

Personally, I believe as the U.S. becomes increasingly more multicultural and our culture changes, we have to drop the expectation that folks assimilate in "acceptable" ways.
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Old 09-14-2013, 03:51 PM   #24
 
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^ You have a very pretty name.


I think people are going to have different opinions of what they find unusual anyway.

I think name trends are interesting. It's amazing how many people think they are naming their child something different or unusual, and it ends up being the most popular baby name that year. My SIL's son and daughter in law recently had a new 10 lb bundle of joy. They wanted to pick a name they had not heard/was not common. They went with Easton. One of my nephews googled the babies name later and saw it had been the #1 boys name for the past few months.
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Old 09-14-2013, 05:10 PM   #25
 
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But anyway- my son is named Jackson (Jack), and one of my biggest pet peeves is weird spellings. I called the doctors office for him about a year ago and said "Jackson," and the nurse said, without prompt, "is that j a x o n?" I was so annoyed. Um, no it's not! I don't hate the jaxon spelling (not for me but I don't hate it) but I was seriously annoyed that it had actually managed to overtake the classic spelling for some reason.
My son's doctor always tried to correct my spelling of Sean. Uh, no, Shaun is perfectly acceptable, but not how my son's name is spelled. My other son's middle name is Reilly, which is a family name, but as part of his adoption (by a family member!) it was changed to Riley. My own name has the shortest, simplest spelling possible, as well as the most widely used, and people still try to spell it differently.



It's sad that people are getting turned down for jobs based on their names. I shake my head a lot at the names people give their children, and I feel sorry for the kids, but really, it's a very rare occurrence for a person to choose his or her own name, so why should they be judged for what their parents chose? Eeeeesh. Keep it simple, people.


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Old 09-14-2013, 07:57 PM   #26
 
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But anyway- my son is named Jackson (Jack), and one of my biggest pet peeves is weird spellings. I called the doctors office for him about a year ago and said "Jackson," and the nurse said, without prompt, "is that j a x o n?" I was so annoyed. Um, no it's not! I don't hate the jaxon spelling (not for me but I don't hate it) but I was seriously annoyed that it had actually managed to overtake the classic spelling for some reason.
My son's doctor always tried to correct my spelling of Sean. Uh, no, Shaun is perfectly acceptable, but not how my son's name is spelled. My other son's middle name is Reilly, which is a family name, but as part of his adoption (by a family member!) it was changed to Riley. My own name has the shortest, simplest spelling possible, as well as the most widely used, and people still try to spell it differently.



It's sad that people are getting turned down for jobs based on their names. I shake my head a lot at the names people give their children, and I feel sorry for the kids, but really, it's a very rare occurrence for a person to choose his or her own name, so why should they be judged for what their parents chose? Eeeeesh. Keep it simple, people.


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I agree. I have noticed that "black" names usually associated with blackness or poverty are now being given to white girls, such as Kendra, Shantal and Trechelle. I wonder if that makes them more acceptable.

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Old 09-15-2013, 01:11 AM   #27
 
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I once saw Olivia (the most beautiful name in world) spelled: Alyvyah. Mom snaps when it's mispronounced.
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Old 09-15-2013, 09:07 AM   #28
 
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Names with an apostrophe? Silly, pretentious and pointless. So are names like Moon Unit, etc. Shouldn't affect a person's ability to get a job but of course, it will, sometimes.
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Old 09-15-2013, 09:44 AM   #29
 
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Originally Posted by dusalocks View Post
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Originally Posted by Josephine View Post
Speaking of names, I think it's also important to consider the country your child is going to be raised in and realistically give your child a name that is at least 'pronounceable' and won't make his/her life a living hell.
I second this but at the same time, I don't know why nobody ever gets the pronunciation of my name right. It's not that difficult or that ethnic. I also once had a tattoo artist say that my name (first and middle) sounded like a stripper's.

Anyways, reading this I automatically thought of this website:

The Utah Baby Namer


Mormons give their kids some pretty funny names and I actually found my name on here so I don't know what that says about me. I wonder if any Utah Mormons have a hard time finding a job should they venture out of state.

Oh and Freakonomics is such a great book. There's also a fantastic film and podcast people might want to check out.
I have only looked at the A's & B's in girl names so far, but there are some rather unusual ones. Some are rather pretty, but I would mad if my parents named me Apathy.


People shouldn't be refused jobs, etc, based on their given name. You can't help what your parents named you. I have still found some ridiculous over the years. I know there has been a thread or two about unusual names here. My 7th grade teacher once taught a boy names Harry Nipples. Why on earth would his parents do that? With that said, I see no point in acting like it's something only specific people do. It's universal.

At one point hospitals could refuse to put names on birth certificates, if found too different or unusual. My mom's middle name is Darcus, which I love and it is a family name, but they asked her parents to put a different name on her bc. They had to, but her father/family still called her Darcus.
Darcus is my mother's name! Had to reply. I didn't know anyone else had that name. Cool!
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Old 09-15-2013, 11:32 AM   #30
 
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^ You have a very pretty name.


I think people are going to have different opinions of what they find unusual anyway.

I think name trends are interesting. It's amazing how many people think they are naming their child something different or unusual, and it ends up being the most popular baby name that year. My SIL's son and daughter in law recently had a new 10 lb bundle of joy. They wanted to pick a name they had not heard/was not common. They went with Easton. One of my nephews googled the babies name later and saw it had been the #1 boys name for the past few months.
Thank you! I love my name.

I think you're right...people do have different ideas of what is unusual, but I was just commenting on the trend of people finding names to be "weird" or "funny."
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Old 09-15-2013, 01:13 PM   #31
 
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Originally Posted by Fifi.G View Post
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I second this but at the same time, I don't know why nobody ever gets the pronunciation of my name right. It's not that difficult or that ethnic. I also once had a tattoo artist say that my name (first and middle) sounded like a stripper's.

Anyways, reading this I automatically thought of this website:

The Utah Baby Namer


Mormons give their kids some pretty funny names and I actually found my name on here so I don't know what that says about me. I wonder if any Utah Mormons have a hard time finding a job should they venture out of state.

Oh and Freakonomics is such a great book. There's also a fantastic film and podcast people might want to check out.
I have only looked at the A's & B's in girl names so far, but there are some rather unusual ones. Some are rather pretty, but I would mad if my parents named me Apathy.


People shouldn't be refused jobs, etc, based on their given name. You can't help what your parents named you. I have still found some ridiculous over the years. I know there has been a thread or two about unusual names here. My 7th grade teacher once taught a boy names Harry Nipples. Why on earth would his parents do that? With that said, I see no point in acting like it's something only specific people do. It's universal.

At one point hospitals could refuse to put names on birth certificates, if found too different or unusual. My mom's middle name is Darcus, which I love and it is a family name, but they asked her parents to put a different name on her bc. They had to, but her father/family still called her Darcus.
Darcus is my mother's name! Had to reply. I didn't know anyone else had that name. Cool!
Well, hello! That is very cool. I have never met anyone else with a family member who shares that name.

I looked it up several years ago and saw it's sometimes a variation of Dorcus, which is a biblical name (Aramaic for Tabitha) of a disciple. It seems to be a name more common with men, though. Anyway, neat! And nice to meet you.
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Old 09-15-2013, 01:17 PM   #32
 
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^ You have a very pretty name.


I think people are going to have different opinions of what they find unusual anyway.

I think name trends are interesting. It's amazing how many people think they are naming their child something different or unusual, and it ends up being the most popular baby name that year. My SIL's son and daughter in law recently had a new 10 lb bundle of joy. They wanted to pick a name they had not heard/was not common. They went with Easton. One of my nephews googled the babies name later and saw it had been the #1 boys name for the past few months.
Thank you! I love my name.

I think you're right...people do have different ideas of what is unusual, but I was just commenting on the trend of people finding names to be "weird" or "funny."
You are very welcome, and I get what you are saying. It's odd that people ask you if your name is made up. That's not something I would do. I tease my friend about the spellings they concoct for their children's names, but I know they are doing it just to be extremely different. They still have pretty names. I just hate it for the youngest when they start learning how to write their names.
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Old 09-15-2013, 02:16 PM   #33
 
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Someone put me down the other day for giving my kids common names. Someone was talking about what they would name their kids if they had them and all I said was to be careful with odd names, it can have an impact on their career opportunities etc. Its sad but true. And they said "well no offense but I could never pick common names for my kids like you, its too boring."

A parent has the right to name their children. Some people choose family names, some want their kid to have a name nobody else has. Others name their kids after something significant or meaningful while others pick a name becuase its pretty.

Personally I never really thought of any of those things indivually but considered all of them. When I was pregnant I would say names out loud and then one just fit. It felt right.
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Old 09-15-2013, 02:41 PM   #34
 
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I knew a Kendra when I was little. White as a lily. That was 30 years ago.
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Old 09-15-2013, 08:27 PM   #35
 
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Actually, "Mercedes" is a very common female name in Spanish speaking countries and almost nobody relates it with Mercedes Benz.
On the other hand, if you tell me you name is "Porsche", the first thing that comes to my mind is the car brand.
I would say that "ghetto" names are popular as well in South America, but lately they consist mostly on misspelled non-Spanish names: "Giovanni" spelled as "Yovany", "Jonathan" spelled as "Yonatan", John" spelled as "Yhon".
Also, excessive long names are considered "ghetto" as well, like "Yubetzeida", "Dubinaris", etc. No, these are not ethnic names. People make them up joining syllables of all members of the same family. And yes, I think it would be more difficult to find a job if your parents gave you one of these names.
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Old 09-16-2013, 05:41 AM   #36
 
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Actually, "Mercedes" is a very common female name in Spanish speaking countries and almost nobody relates it with Mercedes Benz.
On the other hand, if you tell me you name is "Porsche", the first thing that comes to my mind is the car brand.
I would say that "ghetto" names are popular as well in South America, but lately they consist mostly on misspelled non-Spanish names: "Giovanni" spelled as "Yovany", "Jonathan" spelled as "Yonatan", John" spelled as "Yhon".
Also, excessive long names are considered "ghetto" as well, like "Yubetzeida", "Dubinaris", etc. No, these are not ethnic names. People make them up joining syllables of all members of the same family. And yes, I think it would be more difficult to find a job if your parents gave you one of these names.
I relate Mercedes to the car. Probably cause I like both - the name and the make of car.

There are plenty of names with strange spellings even traditionally common names can be spelt a few ways and it doesn't depend on your parents' background such as their religion.

For example "John" and "Jon", "Mathew" and "Matthew", "Lee"and "Lea", "Rebecca" and "Rebekah", "Katherine" and "Catherine".

Also most names are made up by someone for example "Victoria" was made by one of that Queen's uncles' due to political wangling over secession to the throne. Since them it's become common.
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Old 09-16-2013, 06:43 AM   #37
 
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I think regardless of your race, you should give your child a proper name. I didn't realize till I worked for a gentleman whose daughter lived in Germany that you have to give your child an "approved" name there or else it may be rejected by the government. Sometimes I think that is not such a bad idea.

German First Names and Official Approval - Das Standesamt
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Old 09-16-2013, 06:55 AM   #38
 
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I think regardless of your race, you should give your child a proper name. I didn't realize till I worked for a gentleman whose daughter lived in Germany that you have to give your child an "approved" name there or else it may be rejected by the government. Sometimes I think that is not such a bad idea.

German First Names and Official Approval - Das Standesamt

But what is a proper name to you or your culture? Names have meanings for some cultures, and honestly I really like the way some people combine names to make a new name. The government better not tell me what to name my child...
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Old 09-16-2013, 07:32 AM   #39
 
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I think regardless of your race, you should give your child a proper name. I didn't realize till I worked for a gentleman whose daughter lived in Germany that you have to give your child an "approved" name there or else it may be rejected by the government. Sometimes I think that is not such a bad idea.

German First Names and Official Approval - Das Standesamt

But what is a proper name to you or your culture? Names have meanings for some cultures, and honestly I really like the way some people combine names to make a new name. The government better not tell me what to name my child...
I don't know for sure, but I think the government would work with you on a name that is cultural and possibly not on their approved list. I think they are just trying to keep people from giving their children "stupid" names.

I think the old standards are beautiful. I, for one, laugh when I hear some oddball name and feel sorry for the child. Sometimes parents exert their rights to the point that they hinder their children. Shame.
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Old 09-16-2013, 08:43 AM   #40
 
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I know some names can be spelled on different ways, but believe me, in most cases, if I name my child "Estefany" is simply because I don't know how to spell "Stephanie" the proper way and not because I want my child's name to be "exotic".
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