Say It. I Dare You.

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why did i buy a small, cute new cell phone last year?

it's way too small for these old eyes to see...

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http://labellatestarossa.blogspot.ca/

Little Mother of all the Roaches, President-for-Life of the MAC Harlots!
Thank you for the birthday wishes.

Fifi, we also have a lot of patients who read far too much info about their meds and then develop every side-effect going, very frustrating sometimes. I mean I'm all for being well informed but not when that info is used to self-sabotage.
Originally Posted by Starmie
You are welcome

...and that is exactly what he does. I will read over side effects so I know to stop taking a medication if this or that happens but he does it and one day later thinks he has every bad one. He is a hypochondriac in nature. Sunday morning his ribs hurt and he went from sleeping in the wrong position to thinking he had a cancerous tumor in 5 minutes. That's just him.
When I hear terms like "hipster" I think, who told cliques they could leave high school??

And so it begins... Game of Thrones premiered tonight, and those screaming sexist will start their rants. Yes it is, but does one truly have to say (or as some put it, "admit") that? It's a little redundant. He wrote fantasy books based on a specific period and decided to keep some things true to that period. He also wrote some strong female characters that are who they are because of what they have been through, good and bad. I don't really know what harping about the fact that he didn't write it with equality for all will accomplish. It's a little like burying your head in the sand.
Originally Posted by Fifi.G
Yep. Lol. I normally do not read over a great deal of the critiques that pop up any and every time I have tried to look up information on the series, over the past 3+ years. I remember coming across one incredibly lengthy critique (had to be around 13 pages or more, if printed) from a woman ranting about burning comic books and laughing at nerds. It was full of show and book spoilers (demands, double standards, talking to people like they are ignorant and can not think for themselves, and lots of other general weirdness) so I stopped reading. I came across responses to that later on, and more responses to the response, etc. Then you have people arguing about scenes in the show, and then arguing about the explanation the author gave for why a scene was filmed a particular way. W/O spoiling, I came across several comments and stories about one scene involving Daenerys Targaryen last season. The character was dubbed a possible White Savior after it aired. The author explained that the scene in the HBO show was filmed in a section of one particular country, they hired hundreds (close to 1000) of extras, paid them, and it would not have been practical (or in the budget, it was around $40,000 just for the extras they had) for HBO to fly several different races of people out to make the scene (shot in one day) more true to the book and equal. I'm pretty sure the extras were happy to make a buck and be in a tv show. Hell, Deliverance was filmed all over my neck of the woods and I know people who were happy to be in it, regardless of it being a honest walking/talking stereotype and Jaws of the Woods. It still didn't make them fans of incest and backwoods man rape (it's kind of viewed as a warped comedy where I come from) and I am not really sure how that particular scene makes GRRM racist as opposed to HBO filming on location in Morocco, but whatever... It's all a little exhausting to wade through when one is trying to read about other aspects of filming.

*I guess I do not get what it is supposed to accomplish. If you want something written another way, write your own story. *Not a re write of someone else's, but your own*. If you are honestly as passionate (and fond of writing) as some seem to be on the topic. It would accomplish more than demanding that others write or film something you are in no way backing or invested in to your exact specifications, and sending the author 5 pages letters asking why one character didn't look the way you thought they would in the show handled by someone else. I'm not sure they can ever give you the answer you want.

I also do not see how this show is quite literally "threatening" to American women. I can not say I know anyone who watches it thinks... Ah, the good old days when you could sell your daughter/sister and do numerous things to make her submit. In 2014 (US) it's mainly women who trade and sell sell their daughters for drugs.
When I hear terms like "hipster" I think, who told cliques they could leave high school??


Last edited by Fifi.G; 04-07-2014 at 12:30 PM.
This bugs me instead of makes me feel warm.

'If you're not going to be around, make sure you walk your daughter down the aisle, because that's the most important thing you would have done with her...playing your role in the event that is the epoch of her life.' Ugh.

But, I should just be glad his wish was fulfilled.
claudine191 likes this.
“It was only a sunny smile and little it cost in the giving but like morning light it scattered the night and made the day worth living.” - F. Scott Fitzgerald

3B ■ Medium/Course ■ High Porosity
^Reading more in depth about it - it was the photographer's idea.
“It was only a sunny smile and little it cost in the giving but like morning light it scattered the night and made the day worth living.” - F. Scott Fitzgerald

3B ■ Medium/Course ■ High Porosity
This bugs me instead of makes me feel warm.

'If you're not going to be around, make sure you walk your daughter down the aisle, because that's the most important thing you would have done with her...playing your role in the event that is the epoch of her life.' Ugh.

But, I should just be glad his wish was fulfilled.
Originally Posted by sew and sew

I am not sure how I feel about it. Several women I know who lost a father before they got married or while they are still single feel a large void because their father was not there/will not be there to walk them down the aisle or even see it and in many cases, their children. I myself think... If I ever get married, he won't be there. It's perfectly natural for fathers to feel the same way and I am glad he had a dying wish fulfilled but it will never be the same, mean she will get married or make her miss him less when/if she does.

*Some people just want to eat a cheese burger before they pass so to each his own I guess. :-/
When I hear terms like "hipster" I think, who told cliques they could leave high school??


Last edited by Fifi.G; 04-07-2014 at 12:43 PM.
My dress split up the back and I had to borrow a co-wokers coat to go home and change.

My new container of goat cheese and milk are no longer in the fridge

Guess who is having a case of the Mondays
I am not sure how I feel about it. Several women I know who lost a father before they got married or while they are still single feel a large void because their father was not there/will not be there to walk them down the aisle or even see it and in many cases, their children. I myself think... If I ever get married, he won't be there. It's perfectly natural for fathers to feel the same way and I am glad he had a dying wish fulfilled but it will never be the same, mean she will get married or make her miss him less when/if she does.

*Some people just want to eat a cheese burger before they pass so to each his own I guess. :-/
Originally Posted by Fifi.G
It bugs me in a detached sense because I can't begrudge them (photographer, father or her mother) for it. That would be jerkish.

Being irked by how wedding related stuff moooost likely wouldn't spring to mind if that was an 11 year old son rather than a daughter <<<< what it meant for the people involved.
“It was only a sunny smile and little it cost in the giving but like morning light it scattered the night and made the day worth living.” - F. Scott Fitzgerald

3B ■ Medium/Course ■ High Porosity
This bugs me instead of makes me feel warm.

'If you're not going to be around, make sure you walk your daughter down the aisle, because that's the most important thing you would have done with her...playing your role in the event that is the epoch of her life.' Ugh.

But, I should just be glad his wish was fulfilled.
Originally Posted by sew and sew
Sorry but that's just gross to me. (I agree w/ you, sew and sew.)
3b (with 3c tendencies) on modified CG

I am not sure how I feel about it. Several women I know who lost a father before they got married or while they are still single feel a large void because their father was not there/will not be there to walk them down the aisle or even see it and in many cases, their children. I myself think... If I ever get married, he won't be there. It's perfectly natural for fathers to feel the same way and I am glad he had a dying wish fulfilled but it will never be the same, mean she will get married or make her miss him less when/if she does.

*Some people just want to eat a cheese burger before they pass so to each his own I guess. :-/
Originally Posted by Fifi.G
It bugs me in a detached sense because I can't begrudge them (photographer, father or her mother) for it. That would be jerkish.

Being irked by how wedding related stuff moooost likely wouldn't spring to mind if that was an 11 year old son rather than a daughter <<<< what it meant for the people involved.
Originally Posted by sew and sew
No, it probably would not. The wedding to do is mostly made all about the lady. Men wear suits numerous times, women wear "the" dress much less. For the most part A father will still miss seeing his son standing in front of him, getting married to someone he loves. He will miss numerous moments with both. A walk down the aisle would be a little easier for a photographer to orchestrate.

It is odd with an 11 year old. It would be odd with anyone of any age, and I find it a little weird that the photog orchestrated it. Way to make some $$ on decisions made while grieving.
When I hear terms like "hipster" I think, who told cliques they could leave high school??

Apparently quote is not working correctly.

I was saying... No it wouldn't. At least not that part of it. I would not say a father would not feel remorse about missing his son getting married to someone he loves. Maybe having a family and getting to know his grandchildren. The wedding to do is mainly about the bride. You see boys and men in suits on numerous occasions. The dress is a different story, for the most part I guess a trip down the aisle is a little easier to orchestrate than a mock wedding with bride and groom for the photog as well.

Her age does make it weird, but I think I would find it a little odd at every age. I do find it odd that the photographer came up with the idea. Playing on grief... The man is mourning over what he will miss. That is common when a time limit has been put on your life, and before you reach the acceptance phase.
When I hear terms like "hipster" I think, who told cliques they could leave high school??


Last edited by Fifi.G; 04-07-2014 at 03:01 PM.
In a way it makes me think of my good friend. I met her the day her father died. I was 16 and she was 19 (cancer, horrible, years sick and months in the hospital). A couple years later she had some problems and did not have a place to live for awhile. She moved in with me and my parents. My dad knew her father and was talking to her about him. She said that it still crushed her to think of him not being there if she got married or seeing her kids if she had them. She mentioned things he did with her when she was a child and said she would love to see him do those things with her kids. Fishing, picnics, etc. About a year later, she got pregnant. What she said always stuck with my dad. He lost his mom when he was 29, and before I was born. When her son was almost 4 years old, my dad started picking him up and taking him fishing or to the park. He did it for my friend, and so her would know he had an older male figure in his life. It didn't have to be your blood relative. It meant the world to her. I think people can pay attention, be sympathetic, and offer support in much better ways when it needed. Better than a staged picture that is.
rouquinne and Starmie like this.
When I hear terms like "hipster" I think, who told cliques they could leave high school??

Well, that's that. Packed up my desk today. One co-worker completely ignored the rest of us taking down pictures, etc.

When you treat people poorly, they will respond. I really hope the two of you are deluded enough to think I'm still willing to write for you........actually, on second thought, I don't. Why even waste my time refusing? Or even replying, for that matter?

http://geaugadoggy.wordpress.com
In a way it makes me think of my good friend. I met her the day her father died. I was 16 and she was 19 (cancer, horrible, years sick and months in the hospital). A couple years later she had some problems and did not have a place to live for awhile. She moved in with me and my parents. My dad knew her father and was talking to her about him. She said that it still crushed her to think of him not being there if she got married or seeing her kids if she had them. She mentioned things he did with her when she was a child and said she would love to see him do those things with her kids. Fishing, picnics, etc. About a year later, she got pregnant. What she said always stuck with my dad. He lost his mom when he was 29, and before I was born. When her son was almost 4 years old, my dad started picking him up and taking him fishing or to the park. He did it for my friend, and so her would know he had an older male figure in his life. It didn't have to be your blood relative. It meant the world to her. I think people can pay attention, be sympathetic, and offer support in much better ways when it needed. Better than a staged picture that is.
Originally Posted by Fifi.G
Wow, that's awesome. That is heartwarming. Very sweet of your dad.

In the photographer's defense (as far as exploiting grief, she specializes in photographing the terminally ill), this is from a more in-depth piece:

After receiving his diagnosis, Jim and his wife Grace Zetz reached out to Lindsey Villatoro, who specializes in photographing those who are terminally ill, to document some valuable memories in his last months.

Villatoro’s first session with Jim was to photograph the 62-year-old and his wife, but after that she offered her services for free to photograph him with his daughter on her upcoming birthday. Rather than schedule a photo shoot in a park or her studio, she surprised the family by decorating their backyard for a faux wedding.
“I have an 11-year-old, so I basically just thought, if her dad wasn’t here, what would she want?” Villatoro told Today. “And I just thought about Josie being at her wedding in 20 years, and all of a sudden this video pops up and it’s this little girl in an oversized wedding dress [walking down the aisle] with her dad.”

“We didn’t really know what was going to happen –- she put it all together in 72 hours,” Grace Zetz said. “She came in with three truckloads of decorations for my backyard!”
“It was only a sunny smile and little it cost in the giving but like morning light it scattered the night and made the day worth living.” - F. Scott Fitzgerald

3B ■ Medium/Course ■ High Porosity
Well, that's that. Packed up my desk today. One co-worker completely ignored the rest of us taking down pictures, etc.

When you treat people poorly, they will respond. I really hope the two of you are deluded enough to think I'm still willing to write for you........actually, on second thought, I don't. Why even waste my time refusing? Or even replying, for that matter?
Originally Posted by claudine191
There's probably a lot of back story to his I haven't seen at all, but this sounds like a pretty big deal! I want to bump it ahead of my last post. Good luck with everything
claudine191 likes this.
“It was only a sunny smile and little it cost in the giving but like morning light it scattered the night and made the day worth living.” - F. Scott Fitzgerald

3B ■ Medium/Course ■ High Porosity
I
Well, that's that. Packed up my desk today. One co-worker completely ignored the rest of us taking down pictures, etc.

When you treat people poorly, they will respond. I really hope the two of you are deluded enough to think I'm still willing to write for you........actually, on second thought, I don't. Why even waste my time refusing? Or even replying, for that matter?
Originally Posted by claudine191
What happened?
claudine191 likes this.
Modified CG since Dec 2011
In a way it makes me think of my good friend. I met her the day her father died. I was 16 and she was 19 (cancer, horrible, years sick and months in the hospital). A couple years later she had some problems and did not have a place to live for awhile. She moved in with me and my parents. My dad knew her father and was talking to her about him. She said that it still crushed her to think of him not being there if she got married or seeing her kids if she had them. She mentioned things he did with her when she was a child and said she would love to see him do those things with her kids. Fishing, picnics, etc. About a year later, she got pregnant. What she said always stuck with my dad. He lost his mom when he was 29, and before I was born. When her son was almost 4 years old, my dad started picking him up and taking him fishing or to the park. He did it for my friend, and so her would know he had an older male figure in his life. It didn't have to be your blood relative. It meant the world to her. I think people can pay attention, be sympathetic, and offer support in much better ways when it needed. Better than a staged picture that is.
Originally Posted by Fifi.G
Wow, that's awesome. That is heartwarming. Very sweet of your dad.

In the photographer's defense (as far as exploiting grief, she specializes in photographing the terminally ill), this is from a more in-depth piece:

After receiving his diagnosis, Jim and his wife Grace Zetz reached out to Lindsey Villatoro, who specializes in photographing those who are terminally ill, to document some valuable memories in his last months.

Villatoro’s first session with Jim was to photograph the 62-year-old and his wife, but after that she offered her services for free to photograph him with his daughter on her upcoming birthday. Rather than schedule a photo shoot in a park or her studio, she surprised the family by decorating their backyard for a faux wedding.
“I have an 11-year-old, so I basically just thought, if her dad wasn’t here, what would she want?” Villatoro told Today. “And I just thought about Josie being at her wedding in 20 years, and all of a sudden this video pops up and it’s this little girl in an oversized wedding dress [walking down the aisle] with her dad.”

“We didn’t really know what was going to happen –- she put it all together in 72 hours,” Grace Zetz said. “She came in with three truckloads of decorations for my backyard!”
Originally Posted by sew and sew
I am glad it was for free (most people already have thousands upon thousands of dollars in debt and can't even consider extras like photographs from a professional), and spontaneous. It's probably something she hears a lot of when talking to the terminally ill and their family. Still won't ever replace him, and no guarantee she will ever get married or have a big wedding, but that puts the story and reasoning in much better perspective.
When I hear terms like "hipster" I think, who told cliques they could leave high school??


Last edited by Fifi.G; 04-07-2014 at 04:31 PM.
PS- What my dad did was really heart warming. He asked me for her number. I was blown away when I found out why he wanted to talk to her. The conversation around our kitchen table that day had stuck with me, too.

Not to dump out all of her personal business (even though no one here knows who I am talking about)... My friend did not have the easiest life. I can't say her dad was a saint. The man had his problems. Alcoholism runs heavy on both sides of her family, but he was still her daddy and she had a ton of fond memories. My dad could relate to her life in several ways. I think it did him a lot of good to be able to help her cope in some way.
When I hear terms like "hipster" I think, who told cliques they could leave high school??

I
Well, that's that. Packed up my desk today. One co-worker completely ignored the rest of us taking down pictures, etc.

When you treat people poorly, they will respond. I really hope the two of you are deluded enough to think I'm still willing to write for you........actually, on second thought, I don't. Why even waste my time refusing? Or even replying, for that matter?
Originally Posted by claudine191
What happened?
Originally Posted by PerriP
I'm sorry, Ninj, I haven't kept up with the goings-on. You're leaving a job? I hope you're doing ok.
claudine191 likes this.
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Last edited by claudine191; 04-08-2014 at 11:49 AM. Reason: oh, you know, shame fear regret --- the usual.

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