Appalachian

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  • 2 Post By Fifi.G

For boardies who are Appalachian: do you identify as culturally Appalachian if ppl ask you about your ethnic background? Or do you just consider it a geographic thing? Do you consider yourself a cultural/ethnic minority? Do you find any special comfort or strength or "pride" in identifying as such?
3b (with 3c tendencies) on modified CG


Last edited by spiderlashes5000; 10-27-2014 at 12:23 PM.
I do culturally and geographically identify as Appalachian. It's a large part of who I am. I can't say I describe it as my ethnicity, but I was shocked to see it listed basically as such in a few databases on "Race Relations". So, some do. *But that includes a diverse group but is usually boiled down to white and came from Scotland/Ireland*. I love studies done on Appalachian English because there are some really intriguing linguistic differences. I love my area. I love a lot of the culture that stuck with people much longer due to the isolation from being in the mountains. I remain proud even when all the usual stereotypes and insults are hurled my way. I hear it quite often over the phone at work. "Toothless, ignorant, backwoods, banjo playing, sheep f***ing...." Anytime a part time resident gets upset with a local, it reverts back to the same old/same old class system. When it comes to white people, we are at the bottom of that.
spiderlashes5000 and WurlyLox like this.
When I hear terms like "hipster" I think, who told cliques they could leave high school??


Last edited by Fifi.G; 10-27-2014 at 01:21 PM.
^ I think I hear a lot more of that because I do not necessarily sound "local". My brother spent hours and hours, day after day, working with me so I would drop the accent. It can be a major hindrance in finding a job, especially if you go elsewhere, which I have no urge to. I wish he wouldn't have done that but he did and was just trying to look out for me. I still have several pronunciations of words that I will never be able to shake, and I can revert back and translate if need be
When I hear terms like "hipster" I think, who told cliques they could leave high school??

I can't say I describe it as my ethnicity, but I was shocked to see it listed basically as such in a few databases on "Race Relations". So, some do. *But that includes a diverse group but is usually boiled down to white and came from Scotland/Ireland*.
Originally Posted by Fifi.G
Interesting, I was thinking about ethnicity in general and Americans. I guess when they say ethnic Appalachains they mean 'white and came form Scotland/Ireland' and 'lives in this certain region in the U.S.'. Because there really is no ethnic group in America except the 'native' americans.

It's also interesting to figure out ethnicity is divided/evolved. Most people think it's the same as nationality and in many cases it's true but not all the time and obviously not for Americans.
I can't say I describe it as my ethnicity, but I was shocked to see it listed basically as such in a few databases on "Race Relations". So, some do. *But that includes a diverse group but is usually boiled down to white and came from Scotland/Ireland*.
Originally Posted by Fifi.G
Interesting, I was thinking about ethnicity in general and Americans. I guess when they say ethnic Appalachains they mean 'white and came form Scotland/Ireland' and 'lives in this certain region in the U.S.'. Because there really is no ethnic group in America except the 'native' americans.

It's also interesting to figure out ethnicity is divided/evolved. Most people think it's the same as nationality and in many cases it's true but not all the time and obviously not for Americans.
Originally Posted by Josephine

^ very true!

They do tend to generalize too much when talking about "Appalachian Americans". I shared a link in the What Are You Doing Thread (I think) that I was excited about at first and then disappointed by. It was a linguistics study and they were careful to mention that Appalachia is far more diverse than most people think. It brought up those who came and settled from Scotland, Ireland, The Ulster Scots, Germany, Sweden, Spain, France, of course you had some who brought slaves but the area actually has more communities that were established by freed men and women (depending on where you are but this was focused more in the area of WNC that I live in) and of course you have The Cherokee. They are as Appalachian as you can get. So, linguistically, you have pretty interesting mash up but most studies on Appalachian English simply focus on the Scottish/Irish aspect. I think it's the one that boggles their mind a little more. How did they hang on to so many speech patterns and still sing songs that no one has sung in Scotland/Ireland/England for many, many years? I have seen some focus on Cherokee but still less than Scottish influence. This one was about Texana. A community established by a freed woman named Texana, and her husband, in 1850. Well, it ended up being a flop. Basically.... 'Listeners think they (the 2 teen boys who participated in the study) sound white but they are influenced by popular A.A culture when sending instant messages' Wth? There are slight differences in speech patterns with those from Texana, and they are lovely ones. I wish people would focus more on the diversity but it's something I think locals notice more when listening to people talk.

You basically get a "every community has their own syntax that only they can understand". No, we all understand each other but that is where the different influences come in based on exactly where the original settlers came from. *It was incredibly hard for people who lived up in the mountains to visit each other, back in the day, but people did manage to do it from time to time.
When I hear terms like "hipster" I think, who told cliques they could leave high school??


Last edited by Fifi.G; 10-28-2014 at 02:30 PM.
I do have hope for the Appalachian Women's Museum. I have seen some good documentaries done on the women of Appalachia, and they focus more on the diversity as well as what it was like for each of the women (all in their 80s) growing up.

It's a tough group. I know that much.
When I hear terms like "hipster" I think, who told cliques they could leave high school??

Fifi - do you say Applaychan or Appalatchan?
3b (with 3c tendencies) on modified CG

Fifi - do you say Applaychan or Appalatchan?
Originally Posted by spiderlashes5000
I say Appa-lat-chan but the end is more like chun with a quick u. Appa-latch-a when talking about the area. No one near where I live appa-lay-chan but I know people in other parts of the mountains pronounce it that way. And others not from the area.
When I hear terms like "hipster" I think, who told cliques they could leave high school??


Last edited by Fifi.G; 10-28-2014 at 03:45 PM.
We're a "un's" bunch. Come on, yunz!!
When I hear terms like "hipster" I think, who told cliques they could leave high school??

I have been working on genealogy and watching several accent or accent tag videos for fun and between the two, I thought of this thread. I came across this video of a boy in Northern Ireland. His accent was shared on news stations far and wide as funny.

http://youtu.be/wuEJRSmRx0c

It reminded me of this short video with 2 examples of Appalachian English or Mountain Talk. There are numerous variations, just like anywhere else, but listen to second woman. That was probably recorded in the 1980-1990's. The Sociolinguistics Professor is very correct when saying the speech patterns are a large part of cultural identity.

http://youtu.be/5PTML-P3Hl0

This one is a little longer (8 min) and you hear some of the different speech patterns and words that used to be or still are common. It's no where near an example of all. It's more like what I grew up around (and this was filmed in WNC. Do not ever sit beside Gary, the man in the red shirt talking about his grandma calling people "peckerwood" (I still use that) at dinner. He is a well known story teller in WNC and you will be spewing your drink everywhere, all night. The man is hysterical). There are seperate videos on Cherokee but they need examples of all influences in one video. That would make me happy. *It would also make me happy if people did not automatically assume ignorant when, to take an example from this, hearing a person say, "I know you've heared that before" as opposed to heard. I just imagine someone from parts of Scotland/Ireland saying heard. It's a lot like heared when spoken.
They do know heard is correct. Just like flour not Flower.

http://youtu.be/03iwAY4KlIU

I laughed when I came across this. It's people from the Isles watching a video and pondering if we sound like them or not. I think some were expecting people to sound like they just got off the boat. They got off the boat in the 16-1800's (and made a long journey from several different ports. It looks like many stopped in different counties coming across NC. I had family that worked off debt in Georgia before making there way here. Some walked the App Trail from North to South). Some do still have thicker accents but words, emphasis, syntax, vowels... Thats what they listen to/look at. So most were saying NO!! What idiot thought this was like us? One person finally came along and said,

Southern accents vary region to region and sometimes family to family depending on relative quirks.

Early on it can be suggested that there was some similarity between certain American Southern accents and those of the Isle's but we must heavily consider time period, meaning pre-Victorian as we came about to develop our own verbal quirks relative to our experiences away from the Isle's since then.

In the past I myself was duped into this notion that our speech is anything but our own, however from listening to native UK speakers in relation to myself and my kin I would say that there is a gap.

Below I am providing a vocabulary list courtesy of listening in on my own kinfolks for comparison purposes:

Warsh - Wash

Tawrn - Torn

Dow - Door

Howrse - Horse

Pow - Poor

Burd-Bird

Arl - Earl

Lear - Leah (name of an aunt, because we as a family for a time became illiterate post-Civil War so we spelled phonetically. That trend was nipped in the bud in due time I will say.)

Considuh - Consider

Surtin - Certain

Ain't

Ya'll

Ya'll'er (You all were)

Ye's (You was)

Ain't never

I done it instead of I did it

I seen it instead of I saw it

Lay down and shut it as opposed to lie down and be quiet

I's a-fixin' ta (I was about to)

Eidy - Howdy/Hello

Didjee - Did ye/Did you

Airish (windy/chilly)

Afeared - afraid

Brickle - brittle

Now then - Hello

How's that - Come again/please restate

Yander/Yonder - Over there

Haint - Ghost

Boog - Goblin

Holler - Hollow

So on and so on.....

Most of these I have struggled to do away with for these speech patterns resulted in much teasing or alien peoples not taking me seriously in conversations. Relapses happen on occasion when excited or amongst familiar faces but in general speech I have been able to eliminate them. Elocution thus improved.


^^ Wee, haint, booger, naw, I seen it, I's or Ima fixin to, warsh, now then?, oh god yeah, WELL.... (as I ponder or prepare to spin a yarn/tell a story), on and on and on. I truly do not have a thick accent. It's mild but I have my moments and words, can turn it on when speaking and writing.

British and Irish users; How do you perceive the accent of the US South? [Archive] - The Apricity Forum: A European Cultural Community
When I hear terms like "hipster" I think, who told cliques they could leave high school??


Last edited by Fifi.G; 02-11-2015 at 01:10 PM.
I'm amazed at how much it has changed since I was a kid. We were still fairly isolated, other than tourist season. Most the transplant ended up becoming adopted locals at that point. The really isolated, back woods speech, was heard more often. It's not as common anymore, which I hate. I've always loved liatening to the differences. You find them in every community.
When I hear terms like "hipster" I think, who told cliques they could leave high school??

http://youtu.be/saSSlSQwlwg

Cherokee, another influence (back & forth in different communities). I ain't got no idee how folks understood each years ago. Un-real, hain't it?

*The first woman featured, Mandy Swimmer, is dressed exactly like my great grandma, minus the scarf and plus an apron. Simple home made dress, black or brown clunky shoes (and place to hide your snuff). Standard for most women in WNC, year round. They would have one made out of a nicer fabric for church or events, and different sleeve lengths, but it faded out with the older generations in the mid 80's- mid 90's.
When I hear terms like "hipster" I think, who told cliques they could leave high school??


Last edited by Fifi.G; 02-11-2015 at 09:55 AM.

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