View Poll Results: Did you have a c-section?
Yes, for medical reasons 12 85.71%
Yes, for other reasons 2 14.29%
Voters: 14. You may not vote on this poll

Why so many c-sections?

For the moms to be I highly suggest you learn the power of "no, I do not consent". Or very simply a firm no but the "do not consent" part throws in a legal firmness to it.

You don't want an IV - say no. Unless you want drugs you don't HAVE to have it. I remember the nurse asking where my IV cart thingie was when she transferred me to recovery and her shock when I said there was none.

You don't want to be continously monitored - say no. Like RCW said they can if they wish monitor you with a doppler which is what they did last time for me. And if you don't want it as often as 20 minutes - say no and keep moving. They can't strap you down. I remember even at my NST around 41 weeks I wouldn't sit back on the recliner in my MW's office but just stood. Anyone who's had back labor will do anything to prevent that sucker again.

Find your voice, tell THEM what you want and will do. YOU are the consumer/customer despite the authority complexes that most docs & nurses have. There's a local OB practice that has enough influence around here since they treat the upper middle class "soccer moms" around here that they've rewritten the rules of a local hospital to the detriment of moms who prefer low intervention. A client of my doula's was told point blank after asking that OB re: doulas/natural birth, "You'll need to go to another practice. We don't work with doulas and those natural birth people".
Enrica, you were fortunate. I did not see a lactatation consultant until my second day in the hospital. Until then, it was kind of like "fend for yourself, oh and make sure she eats every 2 hours." when I knew very little about how to get Elise latched, etc. I didn't even attempt/wasn't allowed to feed her until 3 hours after she was born (and like marielle, rooming in was encouraged, but co-sleeping at the hospital was a no-go).
Originally Posted by gemini
I believe you and I birthed at the same hospital? I also believe there may have been some underlying reasons for this. For one, I was receiving ALL of my medical at the hospital itself -- I was enrolled in their high-risk clinic, so they were certainly aware of my intentions (or most of them). They asked me regularly and often while in prenatal care and they also had quite a bit of background info on me at their fingertips.

Another thing could have been timing. I was probably there during the most hectic time, just before the new construction was complete. As I mentioned before, they literally ran out of room and placed me post-op somewhere else in the hospital. They even performed the section almost 5 hours after it was scheduled because of this backlog. I don't know -- they may have been more lax and/or trying to make up for lack of facility. I just found them to be extremely accomodating, especially for those things that weren't going quite right.

As I mentioned in the Pregnant Curlies thread, I tried to re-enroll there for this pregnancy, but since my insurance status changed, I was not able to be seen at the clinic. Even my initial doctor (which I selected so I could birth there) could not even get me in for a Level 2 because they were booked solid for 3 months. I guess they are the new game in town. But insurance definitely plays a part in what services you have access to.
Originally Posted by Enrica
You have a good point--I was insured under Kaiser permanente at the time, so I went to their clinics for treatment (100% free prenatal treatment for those curious about cost ).

I had my baby at Holy Cross (after the renovation). While I was in recovery, I was not even shown how to nurse. Only 3 hours later, when I was in my room, did the nurse try to help and by then, the lactation consultants were gone for the day. I was able tgo see one the following morning and again before I left the hospital at my request. I just felt that a hospital that boasted itself as pro breastfeeding and rooming in would have had better support in that area for all times of the day. Babies aren't born only in the hours of 9 to 5 and they certainly need to eat all day too.

I am just grateful that I had few problems getting my daughter to nurse even though I had very little clue of what I was doing.
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whoah talk about timing - check out this article from a canadian paper on Monday reporting on a recent study that suggests higher rates of maternal death and illness with the increase in c-sections:

http://www.canada.com/ottawacitizen/...4c6931&k=96279
Ok, Amneris is prolly really freaking out about now...lol
Originally Posted by WileECoyote - Daddy's grl
Is it too late to get my tubes tied?

(JUST KIDDING!!!!)
Get used to me. Black, confident, cocky; my name, not yours; my religion, not yours; my goals, my own; get used to me. -Muhammad Ali











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Ok, Amneris is prolly really freaking out about now...lol
Originally Posted by WileECoyote - Daddy's grl
Is it too late to get my tubes tied?

(JUST KIDDING!!!!)
Originally Posted by Amneris

Code:
It'll be ok!

You have a good point--I was insured under Kaiser permanente at the time, so I went to their clinics for treatment (100% free prenatal treatment for those curious about cost ).

I had my baby at Holy Cross (after the renovation). While I was in recovery, I was not even shown how to nurse. Only 3 hours later, when I was in my room, did the nurse try to help and by then, the lactation consultants were gone for the day. I was able tgo see one the following morning and again before I left the hospital at my request. I just felt that a hospital that boasted itself as pro breastfeeding and rooming in would have had better support in that area for all times of the day. Babies aren't born only in the hours of 9 to 5 and they certainly need to eat all day too.

I am just grateful that I had few problems getting my daughter to nurse even though I had very little clue of what I was doing.
Originally Posted by gemini
To tell you the truth, Gemini, I'm not entirely sure the woman who jumped in & got us to BF right away wasn't just a super qualified & compassionate nurse rather than a lactation consultant. It was definitely after 5PM I know about day two or so I was getting a little antsy, thinking "am I doing this right?" and they sent one right over. They even sent me home with a hand pump, but I had to ask for it. And then they had some qualified nurses come over for a couple of home visits that helped me out a lot. Again, probably because I was enrolled in HC's OB program & was considered follow-up care. I just didn't know anyone still made housecalls these days.
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Ani,

Just tell her that yes, many people do not realize that you are Black. People come from different places and backgrounds and they tend to read into your appearance things about themselves. White people see that you're part White. Black people see that you're part Black. Hispanics talk to you in Spanish.

You know best what your own personal experience has been. No one else can tell you better, no matter what they think.

I think the obstetrics in this country, like much of the rest of healthcare, has just gone down a bad path for everyone except for insurance companies and malpractice lawyers.

I know a number of OB-GYN's who have given up there OB practices because they can't afford the malpractice insurance they have to pay. My close friend (a Harvard trained OB, practicing in NYC) pays $200K a year for malpractice insurance and was sued 4 times in the first 5 years of her practice (all cases were dismissed - the average OB is sued twice a year). There is going to be a huge shortage of OBs in this country fairly soon.

Most OBs I've talked accept that fetal monitoring is likely to lead to more intervention, but if something was to go wrong, the very first question out of the lawyers mouth is going to be "Was the patient monitored?". Their hands are tied as well. We really have to ask ourselves who is looking after our health if neither the patients nor the doctors feel like they are in control.

I delivered at a very granola hospital and they treated me wonderfully from start to finish. But I had a horrific delivery (no one's fault - well maybe DS's and his big crooked head!). I'm fairly certain, in hindsight, that a C-section would have led to a better outcome in my case, but no one has a crystal ball and I chose to err on the side of having a natural birth. We'll see if I make the same decision next time!
I live in a very small area and we actually have hospitals that have decided to no longer deliver babies because of the malpractice insurance cost. So it's making families drive like 20 to 30 minutes further to give birth. Oh and here's the best part the hospital that's closest to me which my husband just doesn't understand why I will never have a child there) the do not do epidorals and do not allow children unless it is a sibbling in the room to see the baby when it's born, also if you do have a csection there they don't give you a spinal block they just knock you out completely. That hospital seems to be stuck back in time and it gives me the creeps.

I talked to my friend last night who just had a baby on the 30th and she said that the hospital she was in would not allow the baby to be the nursery for more than 3 hours a day she siad that when they put her in her room after giving birth they were setting the baby by her and giving her all these insructions that she wasn't understanding because she was exahusted. She was expected to do all the charting and everything. The hospital where i gave birth would let you keep the baby with you if you wanted to but you could send them to the nursery anytime you wanted to so you could rest. I told my friend that the days I was in the hospital I sent my son to the nursery around 9 or so, so i could get some sleep and rest up before we headed home. She told me "that would have been so nice, I've had like no sleep" If I liked her husband or could atleast stand to be in the same room with him I'd offer to come up and help her get some rest but he gives me the creeps so I'll just go to visit when I know he's at work
Picklesgirl - the not having baby in nursery bit is actually a newer practice, designed to promote BFing and keeping the baby with Mommy as much as possible. The hospital I would have delivered at in Vancouver, doesn't even have a well-baby nursery! Everything is done in room and baby doesn't leave Mommy's side.

That said, my DS did spend time in the nursery because I was so out of it and he needed some extra monitoring.

Where I delivered was totally ok with co-sleeping. And when Karan (and I) spent 1 week back in the hospital when he was 15 days old, I was so exhausted, I actually co-slept with him on the stupid sofa-cot. And it was the nurse that actually helped me get into position (managing his damn IV line)
Picklesgirl - the not having baby in nursery bit is actually a newer practice, designed to promote BFing and keeping the baby with Mommy as much as possible. The hospital I would have delivered at in Vancouver, doesn't even have a well-baby nursery! Everything is done in room and baby doesn't leave Mommy's side.

That said, my DS did spend time in the nursery because I was so out of it and he needed some extra monitoring.

Where I delivered was totally ok with co-sleeping. And when Karan (and I) spent 1 week back in the hospital when he was 15 days old, I was so exhausted, I actually co-slept with him on the stupid sofa-cot. And it was the nurse that actually helped me get into position (managing his damn IV line)
Originally Posted by mad scientist
I understand why they think it's a good thing but I was so stinkin tired after pushing for 2 and 1/2 hours and loboring for like 23 that I needed some time to sleep. I think it should be the mom's choice if she needs to rest then she should be able to ask for the baby to be put in ther nersery for awhile. besides they can always bring the baby back in if he or she needs to eat. The way I see if you have plenty of time to be awake all night with your baby once you get home it's nice to rest while you're in the hospital and can let someone else do it for a day or two...
[quote="picklesgirl"]
Picklesgirl - the not having baby in nursery bit is actually a newer practice, designed to promote BFing and keeping the baby with Mommy as much as possible. The hospital I would have delivered at in Vancouver, doesn't even have a well-baby nursery! Everything is done in room and baby doesn't leave Mommy's side.

That said, my DS did spend time in the nursery because I was so out of it and he needed some extra monitoring.

Where I delivered was totally ok with co-sleeping. And when Karan (and I) spent 1 week back in the hospital when he was 15 days old, I was so exhausted, I actually co-slept with him on the stupid sofa-cot. And it was the nurse that actually helped me get into position (managing his damn IV line)
Originally Posted by mad scientist
I understand why they think it's a good thing but I was so stinkin tired after 2 and 1/2 hours of pushing and loboring for like 23 that I needed some time to sleep. I could barely even hold Max when he was born because of using my arms to push for so long, let alone having him in there the whole time and having to do everything he needed. I think it should be the mom's choice if she needs to rest then she should be able to ask for the baby to be put in ther nersery for awhile. besides they can always bring the baby back in if he or she needs to eat. The way I see if you have plenty of time to be awake all night with your baby once you get home it's nice to rest while you're in the hospital and can let someone else do it for a day or two...
Picklesgirl, it's normal procedure in most hospitals to not allow any children except the siblings of the new baby.
Refusing to do natural birth, and requiring general anesthesia is very irresponsible and I can totally understand not going to that hospital.
There's no such thing as global warming. Chuck Norris was cold so he turned up the sun.
Picklesgirl - oh I hear ya! Next time, if baby and I are well enough, we're going home early. If I have to look after my own baby anyways, I might as well do it in my own home.
I saw an article about this in the National Post.

I think it's silly to have a c-section 'just because', or to want a premature baby because it will be smaller and easier to birth/you have to go on vacation.

But whatever.
Originally Posted by curlyarca
size of pelvis or not, the pelvis can accomodate most babies. some don't want it to ("stretch" a bit, that is). it's not all bone, some is cartilage.

"In the depth of winter, I finally learned that within me there lay an invincible summer."

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I couldn't believe it... people in the birthing class were freaking out about giving birth!!!! I was freaking out about a c section and they thought I was the crazy one. Let me see... surgery WHILE YOUR AWAKE!!! Plus I've talked to people who could feel it while it was happening. I would take natural anyday. Takes longer to recover, they will not let you give birth another way after a c section, you have to watch it happening, you will be scared for life... need I say more? Give me natural or give me death (ok not really but it sounded good in my head).





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