View Poll Results: Did you have a c-section?
Yes, for medical reasons 12 85.71%
Yes, for other reasons 2 14.29%
Voters: 14. You may not vote on this poll

Why so many c-sections?

It does seem like everyone has C-sections lately. Maybe it's the bigger babies - there seem to be lots of 8 and 9 pound babies out there, almost seems to be the norm (and maybe this is just my imagination) - it doesn't seem like it's always been this way. I was 5 or 6 pounds, which was not premature, at least not at that time. I was a few days early, though. Maybe it is because better health conditions are extending pregnancies (*I know nothing about childbirth*), I don't know. I just squirm at the thought of being cut open, and at the thought of carrying a 9 pound baby, for that matter. Some of these pregnancy threads make me never want to have a baby (not that I really want to anyway, at least at this time). The population control agencies should distribute copies of these threads to everyone - they could win some people over, definitely.
Originally Posted by Kenzie_06
Exactly what I was saying on my thread!
Get used to me. Black, confident, cocky; my name, not yours; my religion, not yours; my goals, my own; get used to me. -Muhammad Ali











I saw an article about this in the National Post.

I think it's silly to have a c-section 'just because', or to want a premature baby because it will be smaller and easier to birth/you have to go on vacation.

But whatever.

"In the depth of winter, I finally learned that within me there lay an invincible summer."

4a, mbl, low porosity, normal thickness, fine hair.
And inductions are also sold as no big deal, I don't think many women are informed that an induction increases the risk of C-section significantly (over labor that begins on its own)
Originally Posted by geeky
This is exactly why I was so opposed to an induction in the first place. I honestly don't know a single woman who had an induction who didn't end up with a c-section.
Originally Posted by SweetPickles
Totally true. I also agree with Marielle. Nothing about our bodies have changed, but birth and labor is no longer handled by women as an art form. It's handled by men as a medical procedure.

Plus, women of various ages don't mix anymore; we just hang around people our own age and take a lot of Advil. So, we've lost that connection with our elders, who knew how to give birth. And, honestly, we've forgotten what pain is. It used to be that a pregnant woman would labor with a midwife who knew what to do instinctively. They oiled up the birth canal instead of using a knife. They talked to the laboring mother. It was a completely different approach. Nowadays, where's the love?

And, you know what made my contractions intensify? Water. I had yanked out the IV because it hurt more than the contractions and I was thirsty as could be. Every time I had a gulp of water, the contractions intensified for about five mintues. But, for some reason, the doctors prefer to give women pitocin. It's a comedy show in there, I tell ya.

The most interesting part:

After my baby was born, he was alert. Very, very alert. So much so, that the nurses down the hall came to check him out. I asked my nurse why they were all making such a fuss over my baby when they see them all day. She said, and I quote, "We hardly ever see babies that don't come by epidural anymore. I'd forgotten what they were like."
RE: C sections delaying your milk coming in---It took a week for my milk to come in. My dr seemed to think it was due to the pain meds (percocet) I was on for the C section.
Originally Posted by loosecurls
Yes, studies show that c-sections delay the milk. That was a huge factor in my refusing to have one. Delay is a more accurate word than prevent. But, by the time the milk comes in with a c-section, the babies often have gotten used to the bottle, thereby making breastfeeding a bigger challenge.

Like I said before, no one whose had a c-section wants to hear all the negatives associated with it. This conversation is going to turn into everyone defending and explaining their personal choices.
Originally Posted by Chocolate Curls
Why put it out there for those who don't have a choice?

I'm just tired of hearing the negativity on the front that you're deemed as having less of a birth experience or somehow less of a woman because you do. Personally, none of the breastfeeding problems ever applied to me (in fact my milk came in while I was pregnant and didn't stop for years after I was done). My 2nd was actually stronger and more alert than any baby (her Ap scores were off the chart).

Let's face it, there's positive and negative experiences to both sides. I just don't see the point of haranguing women over it or trying to discredit their medical reasons, whatever they are. Let's be fair here -- is anyone giving such grief to those who had a natural birth?
3c representative of a 2c-4a curly clan.
Keeping it simple, natural & sulfate free. Fan of pure oils, butters & glycerin to moisturize.
Well, in a nutshell, it's the topic of the thread. We're discussing the reasons why there's a rise in c-sections. There are a lot of people who do have a choice, but don't understand all the implications of a c-section because people want to brush it under the rug. Let's talk about it! Knowledge it power!
Well, in a nutshell, it's the topic of the thread. We're discussing the reasons why there's a rise in c-sections. There are a lot of people who do have a choice, but don't understand all the implications of a c-section because people like you want to brush it under the rug. Let's talk about it! Knowledge it power!
Originally Posted by Chocolate Curls

CC, dear - I've been seeing a new side of you lately!
Well, in a nutshell, it's the topic of the thread. We're discussing the reasons why there's a rise in c-sections. There are a lot of people who do have a choice, but don't understand all the implications of a c-section because people like you want to brush it under the rug. Let's talk about it! Knowledge it power!
Originally Posted by Chocolate Curls
Also, because someone who has yet to give birth might be helped by some of this information in the future. It's sure helpful (and gruesome!) to me! I now know some of the things to watch/ask for if I have children.
Get used to me. Black, confident, cocky; my name, not yours; my religion, not yours; my goals, my own; get used to me. -Muhammad Ali











RE: C sections delaying your milk coming in---It took a week for my milk to come in. My dr seemed to think it was due to the pain meds (percocet) I was on for the C section.
Originally Posted by loosecurls
Yes, studies show that c-sections delay the milk. That was a huge factor in my refusing to have one. Delay is a more accurate word than prevent. But, by the time the milk comes in with a c-section, the babies often have gotten used to the bottle, thereby making breastfeeding a bigger challenge.

Like I said before, no one whose had a c-section wants to hear all the negatives associated with it. This conversation is going to turn into everyone defending and explaining their personal choices.
Originally Posted by Chocolate Curls
Why put it out there for those who don't have a choice?

I'm just tired of hearing the negativity on the front that you're deemed as having less of a birth experience because you do. Personally, none of the breastfeeding problems ever applied to me (in fact my milk came in while I pregnant and didn't stop for years after I was done). My 2nd was actually stronger and more alert than any baby (her Ap scores were off the chart).

Let's face it, there's positive and negative experiences to both sides. I just don't see the point of haranguing women over it or trying to discredit their medical reasons, whatever they are. Let's be fair here -- is anyone giving such grief to those who had a natural birth?
Originally Posted by Enrica
I agree with you, Enrica. I think those comments are very insensitive to those not "skilled in the art" of vaginal delivery. Almost like asking an amputee why she chose to have her leg cut off and then mocking her reasons.

I agree that c-sections are way too common nowadays, but to chide women for having without understanding the circumstances is just ridiculous.
3b (with 3c tendencies) on modified CG

Well, in a nutshell, it's the topic of the thread. We're discussing the reasons why there's a rise in c-sections. There are a lot of people who do have a choice, but don't understand all the implications of a c-section because people like you want to brush it under the rug. Let's talk about it! Knowledge it power!
Originally Posted by Chocolate Curls

CC, dear - I've been seeing a new side of you lately!
Originally Posted by Meghuney
I edited it, but it's too late. That came out sort of nasty and I didn't mean it to. The point it, when you avoid talking about negative things or things that make you uncomfortable, then other people behind you don't have all that information from which to learn.
Well, in a nutshell, it's the topic of the thread. We're discussing the reasons why there's a rise in c-sections. There are a lot of people who do have a choice, but don't understand all the implications of a c-section because people like you want to brush it under the rug. Let's talk about it! Knowledge it power!
Originally Posted by Chocolate Curls

CC, dear - I've been seeing a new side of you lately!
Originally Posted by Meghuney
I edited it, but it's too late. That came out sort of nasty and I didn't mean it to. The point it, when you avoid talking about negative things or things that make you uncomfortable, then other people behind you don't have all that information from which to learn.
Originally Posted by Chocolate Curls
Awwww, I'm sorry! I know you didn't mean for it to come out nasty! That's why I was kiddin' with ya!
It would be nice if the discussion were staying along those lines, but your statement borders on something like there's something wrong with women's *medical reasons* in general. A lot of its personal, has everything to do with the situation you're in when presented with these facts, and physical reasons why some are not willing to take risks. It's so individual.

Sure there are those out there who haven't given it any thought, have never been faced with a life-threatening emergency, but let's be clear about who and what we are addressing. My feel is while there is some, if you want to call it *abuse* of the procedure, from what I've been reading there is a very small percentage of these elective surgeries, just because. We live in an era where the infant mortality rate is clearly affected by our advances in medicine and that's where I see the rise of surgeries coming in. There are way more preventive procedures occuring that weren't possible before.
3c representative of a 2c-4a curly clan.
Keeping it simple, natural & sulfate free. Fan of pure oils, butters & glycerin to moisturize.
RE: C sections delaying your milk coming in---It took a week for my milk to come in. My dr seemed to think it was due to the pain meds (percocet) I was on for the C section.
Originally Posted by loosecurls
Yes, studies show that c-sections delay the milk. That was a huge factor in my refusing to have one. Delay is a more accurate word than prevent. But, by the time the milk comes in with a c-section, the babies often have gotten used to the bottle, thereby making breastfeeding a bigger challenge.

Like I said before, no one whose had a c-section wants to hear all the negatives associated with it. This conversation is going to turn into everyone defending and explaining their personal choices.
Originally Posted by Chocolate Curls
Why put it out there for those who don't have a choice?

I'm just tired of hearing the negativity on the front that you're deemed as having less of a birth experience because you do. Personally, none of the breastfeeding problems ever applied to me (in fact my milk came in while I pregnant and didn't stop for years after I was done). My 2nd was actually stronger and more alert than any baby (her Ap scores were off the chart).

Let's face it, there's positive and negative experiences to both sides. I just don't see the point of haranguing women over it or trying to discredit their medical reasons, whatever they are. Let's be fair here -- is anyone giving such grief to those who had a natural birth?
Originally Posted by Enrica
I agree with you, Enrica. I think those comments are very insensitive to those not "skilled in the art" of vaginal delivery. Almost like asking an amputee why she chose to have her leg cut off and then mocking her reasons.

I agree that c-sections are way too common nowadays, but to chide women for having without understanding the circumstances is just ridiculous.
Originally Posted by spiderlashes5000
I totally agree with this statement. My baby could NOT have been born without a c-section (my son). My doctor tried to externally avert (sp) him, however, it would have killed him if he tried harder. Again, my son was born with neck problems, needing physical therapy because of his size and being breech.

At my first prenatal appt when I was pregnant with him, I made it VERY clear to my doctor that I didn't want to have a c-section.

Well, turns out, I didn't get a choice.

Second time around, I did have a choice. She wasn't breech, and yeah, I probably could have waited to go into labor on my own. However, I couldn't be induced, and scheduling the section was better for us. I am glad that I had my second section. She was all ready the same size as her big brother, and she was born at 39 weeks. He was born at almost 42 weeks. If I waited another week or two, she would have been well over 9 pounds and probably 23 inches long. That's pretty big for lil 5'2" M2LR.
Enrica,

I think at the point that most women do get a C-section, it's pretty medically necessary. I do feel that the current system is messed up in that it gets too many women to that point, where if they'd taken a different path from the start it would not be necessary in many cases. I am not judging any individual woman. I know they all try to do what is best in their situations. But I don't think so many women should be ending up in that sitation in the first place.

And clearly there are cases (placenta previa, YOOGE babies, eclampsia, etc.) where the C-section is necessary no matter what. But I hear of so many cases (like Gemini) where it seems like what the doctors and/or insurance companies seem to cause the C-section for no damn good reason.
To Trenell, MizKerri and geeky:
I pray none of you ever has to live in a communist state.

Geeky is my hero. She's the true badass. The badass who doesn't even need to be a badass. There aren't enough O's in cool to describe her.
Is it really true that big babies are harder to birth?

My mama and other women in my family say they are easier ("they just slide out") and that that is a myth. I was always skeptical of that.
Get used to me. Black, confident, cocky; my name, not yours; my religion, not yours; my goals, my own; get used to me. -Muhammad Ali











Let's face it, there's positive and negative experiences to both sides.
Originally Posted by Enrica
For the record, while I had a terrible time with the actual procedure itself, while I was in *labor* for 52 hours (yes, really), and while I had no choice about the c-section, I still do not feel cheated in any way or that my birth experience was, overall, a negative experience. And I definitely don't feel it was any less valid. My midwives did everything in their power to give me the natural birth I hoped to have, the way I wanted it to happen, and I am grateful for their efforts. My body, and my stubborn baby, just had other plans for me!
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Is it really true that big babies are harder to birth?

My mama and other women in my family say they are easier ("they just slide out") and that that is a myth. I was always skeptical of that.
Originally Posted by Amneris
I would guess it is impossible to say. There are just too many variables. Overall size, head size, baby position and rotation, intensity of contractions, duration of labor, how the woman is feeling at the time, how much rest she's had bafore labor, how fit she is, whether the nurse assigned to her is a beyotch or not. All those affect the experience. Plus, there is no objective scale to measure it.
To Trenell, MizKerri and geeky:
I pray none of you ever has to live in a communist state.

Geeky is my hero. She's the true badass. The badass who doesn't even need to be a badass. There aren't enough O's in cool to describe her.
Is it really true that big babies are harder to birth?

My mama and other women in my family say they are easier ("they just slide out") and that that is a myth. I was always skeptical of that.
Originally Posted by Amneris
It's not really the size of the baby, but more the size of your pelvis. There are women that I know that have naturally given birth to 12 or 13 pound babies. One woman gave birth to twins that were 6 pounds EACH (that's good sized for twins).

And you never really know how your body is going to be during pregnancy/labor/birth/post partum. Your mama can tell you all she wants about what it's like, but every women/pregnancy/labor/birth/baby is different.
You guys type faster than I can read and respond. But for the record, I'm open to this discussion, I just wanted to be sure we're being sensitive as Spiderlashes pointed out.

Geeky, I agree that there is definitely a quality of care issue going on as well. But that is a broader topic on the state of medicine in the US - access to care, insurance practices, etc. all factor in.

SweetPickles, I hear you. I glad my babies are alive and thriving! But I tell you, sometimes the reactions you get when you say c-section are not the same rousing cheers you get for a regular labor/delivery. Somehow folks think you got off easy or something.
3c representative of a 2c-4a curly clan.
Keeping it simple, natural & sulfate free. Fan of pure oils, butters & glycerin to moisturize.
But I tell you, sometimes the reactions you get when you say c-section are not the same rousing cheers you get for a regular labor/delivery. Somehow folks think you got off easy or something.
Originally Posted by Enrica
Me, I don't think you got off easy, I think you got off harder with a harder recovery. So if I'm not cheering, it's out of sympathy.
To Trenell, MizKerri and geeky:
I pray none of you ever has to live in a communist state.

Geeky is my hero. She's the true badass. The badass who doesn't even need to be a badass. There aren't enough O's in cool to describe her.
It does seem like everyone has C-sections lately. Maybe it's the bigger babies - there seem to be lots of 8 and 9 pound babies out there, almost seems to be the norm (and maybe this is just my imagination) - it doesn't seem like it's always been this way. I was 5 or 6 pounds, which was not premature, at least not at that time. I was a few days early, though. Maybe it is because better health conditions are extending pregnancies (*I know nothing about childbirth*), I don't know. I just squirm at the thought of being cut open, and at the thought of carrying a 9 pound baby, for that matter. Some of these pregnancy threads make me never want to have a baby (not that I really want to anyway, at least at this time). The population control agencies should distribute copies of these threads to everyone - they could win some people over, definitely.
Originally Posted by Kenzie_06
Exactly what I was saying on my thread!
Originally Posted by Amneris
LOL! I think the Cs are more the doctors' fear of the woman delivering an 8 or 9 pound baby. Hubby's grandma was all of 5' (and barely so). Total waif of a woman who was pretty darn healthy until she died at around age 90. She had 9 kids and the family pic looks like a football team of pure linebackers behind this teeny, tiny woman. All around 9-10 lbs including 2 very large sets of twins (of course not 9-10lbs each). The women as big as the men. All delivered vaginally.

I don't like to drive salt into wounds or make people feel defensive. Please understand that while I acknowledge like Geeky that there are definitely situations that call for an emergency C-section, most c-sections these days are due to the heavy hand of overmedicalized births. Redcatwaves said in her post and I've read it as well that despite the increase in C-sections there has been no measurable increase in positive outcomes of births. We still have an exceedingly high rate of infant mortality for an advanced country unlike places like Sweden that work under the midwifery model and only refer high risk pregnancies to OBs.

Obstetricians are surgical specialists. Think about that, their speciality is SURGICAL. The speciality of midwives is delivery babies and caring for laboring moms.

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