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View Poll Results: What box do you check?
Black 32 19.75%
White 84 51.85%
Spanish/Hispanic/Latino 12 7.41%
Asian 5 3.09%
Native American 2 1.23%
Other 27 16.67%
Voters: 162. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 07-16-2006, 11:14 AM   #41
 
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only 3 of us identify as black? that ****'s deeper than the pacific ocean.
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Old 07-16-2006, 11:29 AM   #42
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I always identify as black.
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Old 07-16-2006, 11:32 AM   #43
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WebjockeyGuide
I always identify as wealthy.
That can be a great common denominator.

I'll be good now.
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Old 07-16-2006, 12:47 PM   #44
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jazzijenni81
only 3 of us identify as black? that ****'s deeper than the pacific ocean.
i definetly agree. so another reason i have a hard time identifying myself simply as black is because i was raised without any specific american subculture (black, white, hispanic, etc.). my parents only spoke/speak standard american english in the home, there were no traditional black foods, music, customs, parenting styles, clothing, language or anything else in my home. so i really didnt begin learning about black culture until i was about 19 yrs old.

and like ive said before, if someone personally asks me, "what are you?" i can usually tell if they mean are you biracial, black, hispanic, what have you (in that case i tell them im black) or if they mean what are you mixed with (thats when i say black, white, and american indian.

race and ethnicity and culture arent as cut and dry as most people think!
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Old 07-16-2006, 01:21 PM   #45
 
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I'm black.
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Old 07-16-2006, 01:41 PM   #46
 
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I'm white. I really don't think there's any other way to describe it, for me!
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Old 07-16-2006, 02:04 PM   #47
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WebjockeyGuide
I always identify as black.
Ditto.
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Old 07-16-2006, 02:29 PM   #48
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dia99
Quote:
Originally Posted by WebjockeyGuide
I always identify as wealthy.
That can be a great common denominator.

I'll be good now.
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Old 07-16-2006, 02:58 PM   #49
 
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I identify as Black.

My father is white and my mother is black. I am 1/8 Choctaw Indian, but that is not enough Indian to claim to avoid being black

In addition, I claim black even though my father is white because I was raised by my black mother, with my black sisters and brother and as my mother has always said, "People will never see you as anything else but black."

So there you have it
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Old 07-16-2006, 05:04 PM   #50
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by subbrock
my parents only spoke/speak standard american english in the home
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Old 07-16-2006, 05:53 PM   #51
 
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Quote:
because i was raised without any specific american subculture (black, white, hispanic, etc.). my parents only spoke/speak standard american english in the home,

I speak "standard american english". Doesn't make me any less black. Nor does "Ebonics" make one any moreso.


ETA: You know what? let me not overreact to your wording. I know what you're trying to say. It just bugs me to have poor english equated with being black.
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Old 07-16-2006, 06:29 PM   #52
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FreeCurls
Quote:
because i was raised without any specific american subculture (black, white, hispanic, etc.). my parents only spoke/speak standard american english in the home,

I speak "standard american english". Doesn't make me any less black. Nor does "Ebonics" make one any moreso.


ETA: You know what? let me not overreact to your wording. I know what you're trying to say. It just bugs me to have poor english equated with being black.
that gave me an eye brow raise also. Im am curious as to how her family identifies themselves. From her pciture I cant believe there were no conversations in her home relating to her being black since she "looks" black. At least regular old garden variety american black. Maybe she grew up in another country.
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Old 07-16-2006, 06:48 PM   #53
 
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Subbrock Wrote:

Quote:
i definetly agree. so another reason i have a hard time identifying myself simply as black is because i was raised without any specific american subculture (black, white, hispanic, etc.). my parents only spoke/speak standard american english in the home, there were no traditional black foods, music, customs, parenting styles, clothing, language or anything else in my home. so i really didnt begin learning about black culture until i was about 19 yrs old.
I'm a little confused by this statement Subbrock. You live in Greensboro, North Carolina right? Did you just move there or....? That area has an African American population of almost 38%. That was in 2000. I can't imagine what it may be now and your saying you were never exposed to anything in the black culture?
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Old 07-16-2006, 07:05 PM   #54
 
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Other.

I'm Arab. I guess I could have checked "White" but I don't feel comfortable with that entirely.
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Old 07-16-2006, 07:11 PM   #55
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Aphro-Deeziac
Quote:
Originally Posted by FreeCurls
Quote:
because i was raised without any specific american subculture (black, white, hispanic, etc.). my parents only spoke/speak standard american english in the home,

I speak "standard american english". Doesn't make me any less black. Nor does "Ebonics" make one any moreso.


ETA: You know what? let me not overreact to your wording. I know what you're trying to say. It just bugs me to have poor english equated with being black.
that gave me an eye brow raise also. Im am curious as to how her family identifies themselves. From her pciture I cant believe there were no conversations in her home relating to her being black since she "looks" black. At least regular old garden variety american black. Maybe she grew up in another country.
I'm learning a lot from this thread.

Apparently you can have 2 black parents, look black, and yet still somehow not be black b/c you speak proper English and listen to pop music in the home?
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Old 07-16-2006, 07:13 PM   #56
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by x_tigerlily
Other.

I'm Arab. I guess I could have checked "White" but I don't feel comfortable with that entirely.
Are Arabs considered "white"? I know they are considered caucasian, but caucasian doesn't necessarily mean white.

Based on how Arabs are treated these days including what's currently going on in Lebanon (which I am really disheartened about) I don't think most Americans consider Arabs white.

So much confusion on this thread. This is what happens when folks get racial. Don't say I didn't warn ya'll.
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Old 07-16-2006, 07:36 PM   #57
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GabbyC
I identify as Black.

My father is white and my mother is black. I am 1/8 Choctaw Indian, but that is not enough Indian to claim to avoid being black

In addition, I claim black even though my father is white because I was raised by my black mother, with my black sisters and brother and as my mother has always said, "People will never see you as anything else but black."

So there you have it
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Old 07-16-2006, 07:41 PM   #58
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ZzZoe
Quote:
Originally Posted by Aphro-Deeziac
Quote:
Originally Posted by FreeCurls
Quote:
because i was raised without any specific american subculture (black, white, hispanic, etc.). my parents only spoke/speak standard american english in the home,

I speak "standard american english". Doesn't make me any less black. Nor does "Ebonics" make one any moreso.


ETA: You know what? let me not overreact to your wording. I know what you're trying to say. It just bugs me to have poor english equated with being black.
that gave me an eye brow raise also. Im am curious as to how her family identifies themselves. From her pciture I cant believe there were no conversations in her home relating to her being black since she "looks" black. At least regular old garden variety american black. Maybe she grew up in another country.
I'm learning a lot from this thread.

Apparently you can have 2 black parents, look black, and yet still somehow not be black b/c you speak proper English and listen to pop music in the home?
talk about it babygirl, talk about it


Meg,

you and your son are sooo friggin cute, i just wanna bite his booty and pinch your cheeks
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Old 07-16-2006, 07:59 PM   #59
 
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Awwwww! Thanks!!!!
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Old 07-16-2006, 08:00 PM   #60
 
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I am like Jazzi my father is honduran but hes still black. He told we a funny story that when he was born in the 50's my grandparents had to convince the hospital that my grandmother was hispanic(shes really dark) so she could deliver my father in the white hospital. So to end the post I think I am black I am just a half black latina if that makes since.
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