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Old 08-21-2009, 01:05 PM   #21
 
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Oops, duplicate post!
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Old 08-21-2009, 01:09 PM   #22
 
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i dont want her to grow up thinking that a pistachio is a death sentence, but i dont want to be too lax about the situation either.

Being the parent of an allergic kid is a fine and difficult line to walk. My friend's daughter is 11 and has been severely allergic to milk and wheat since birth. She has many allergies, but those are her main ones. I know it's real, because I've seen the kid go into anaphalaxis myself. There are many things she can't eat, but there are also many things she can eat. The problem is...she became so freaking afraid to eat that she barely eats was diagnosed as Failure-To-Thrive at age 5. Her mother is a nervous-panicky type, and I don't think that has helped. She's been treated by eating disorder clinics, because her FTT has now evolved into anorexia. She weighs about 50 pounds now, still severely underweight. She looks skeletal and weak and just very unhealthy. She's homeschooled, because of the allergies, and gets barely any exercise...she's just too tired all the time.

I don't really have any advice. I guess just try to be cautious without showing fear and teaching fear. Hopefully, she'll outgrow the worst of it.
I can only imagine. When I started getting these food allergies, I never got anything really severe, just itching and standard allergy symptoms (though bad enough that I needed benedryl), but was told that they could develop into anaphalatic attack and prescribed an epi-pen.

Now, that has become my greatest fear. I have given myself panic attacks over thinking I ate something I'm allergic too and now I tend to not try new foods mostly because I'm scared. I even have nightmares about it. I can only imagine what its like for someone that already had an anaphalatic attack, especially a child.
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Old 08-21-2009, 01:21 PM   #23
 
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Yes, you really have to focus on what they can eat. my nephew was allergic to oranges/limes/lemons, rice, wheat, soy, dairy (intolerant), eggs, bananas and chicken (I think I have it all). That was a little overwhelming to my sister. I had her make a list of what he could eat and that really helped her see things differently.
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Old 08-21-2009, 02:50 PM   #24
 
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Being the parent of an allergic kid is a fine and difficult line to walk. My friend's daughter is 11 and has been severely allergic to milk and wheat since birth. She has many allergies, but those are her main ones. I know it's real, because I've seen the kid go into anaphalaxis myself. There are many things she can't eat, but there are also many things she can eat. The problem is...she became so freaking afraid to eat that she barely eats was diagnosed as Failure-To-Thrive at age 5. Her mother is a nervous-panicky type, and I don't think that has helped. She's been treated by eating disorder clinics, because her FTT has now evolved into anorexia. She weighs about 50 pounds now, still severely underweight. She looks skeletal and weak and just very unhealthy. She's homeschooled, because of the allergies, and gets barely any exercise...she's just too tired all the time.

I don't really have any advice. I guess just try to be cautious without showing fear and teaching fear. Hopefully, she'll outgrow the worst of it.
that's exactly what i dont want to happen.
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Old 08-21-2009, 04:30 PM   #25
 
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I'm back to post...

So, as you know, my 20 month old daughter has a long list of food allergies which include nuts and peanuts. Her most severe reactions have been to milk and eggs.

I've read all the same message boards and blogs and have also been completely freaked out by what I read. But I have also met lots of parents of allergic kids who I think take a very balanced and reasonable approach to life with food allergies. That's the way I'd like to be. So while I can't judge a parent who become hyper-vigilant after their child has had a life-threatening reaction, its just not in my nature to live in fear. I don't want my daughter to live like that either. The real world is going to involve negotiating food choices and unfortunately, some accidental exposures. I do what I can to protect her, but I won't keep her in a bubble.

We don't avoid all of Sandhya's allergens in our house (we'd starve if we did). But we follow some simple rules - we only eat in the kitchen, and Sandhya only eats in her booster chair. No other kid is allowed to use her chair. Everyone washes their hands after eating, and the floor is swept after a meal (she's a crawler and will eat anything she finds).

The fact that my 3 year old seems to understand his little sister's allergies and that she can't share food and that anything she eats needs to be cleared through Mama first etc... makes me hopeful that she will also understand it by the time she is out of my constant supervision. My 3 year old is also generally uninterested in other people's food - he doesn't care what other kids are eating as long as he is eating something that he likes. That's the approach I take with Sandhya - I don't expect other people to cater to her eating restrictions, but I always have something special for her just in case. At preschool, I'll be packing her a "treat box" to keep at school so that if someone brings in cupcakes for a birthday and she can't eat them, then she'll have something special for her.

We are starting daycare once a week, next month and I'm definitely nervous. But the DCP and I have come up with some good guidelines - I'll take her booster chair and that's where she'll eat. No milk sippies or bottles except at the table. No nuts and peanut butter served while she's there. All the kids hands and mouths are wiped down after meals. I will be ordering her a medical ID bracelet just so that there is a visual reminder to her care providers.

The preschools and elementary schools around here are all nut and peanut free. Kids are not allowed to share food and can only eat in their designated eating place. I'm not sure how vigilantly that is enforced unless there is a nut-allergic kid in the class so I think it will definitely be worth a conversation with the teacher at the beginning of the school year. Most schools have dealt with this kind of thing before.

Hopefully your DD (and mine) will grow out their food allergies - even nut allergies can be outgrown. But in the mean time, we do what we can.
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Old 08-21-2009, 08:49 PM   #26
 
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my munchkin had a relatively serious reaction to peacans, so her pediatrician referred us to see an allergist. after the allergy test, it has been confirmed that she has a pretty severe allergy to tree nuts. since then ive been researching food allergies and lurking around food allergy support groups and to be honest, its scared the buhjeezus out of me. folks are writing letters to all their kid's classmates telling them what not to pack in their lunches, i see things about chef's notes, ingredient cards to find other terms for ingredients which may include tree nuts, and alot of approaches seem a bit overboard to me.

dont get me wrong, i carry around her epi pens and some benadryl (shes also allergic to cats), so i'll always be prepared "just in case", but im wondering how much of the extra stuff is necessary. i just keep picturing the tummuy tub thread and i dont want to be duped into buying anything thats completely unnecessary, but at the same time, i dont want to put my child's life in danger.

id love to hear what the opinions and advice of those who have managed to survive living past the age of 5
Bless her heart! I don't have any advice to give on food allergies,but my kids have hayfever.Don't worry she'll be just fine,you've been doing an excellent job with her so far .
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Old 08-25-2009, 07:47 AM   #27
 
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to my knowledge, schools here don't restrict what foods parents can pack for their kids. so assuming that peanut butter crackers and pb&j are still staples in many kids' lunches, the ones who are allergic may possibly be slowly building immunity to peanuts with the trace amounts they are exposed to.
Around here, most schools (if not all) are peanut free.
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Old 08-25-2009, 08:29 AM   #28
 
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to my knowledge, schools here don't restrict what foods parents can pack for their kids. so assuming that peanut butter crackers and pb&j are still staples in many kids' lunches, the ones who are allergic may possibly be slowly building immunity to peanuts with the trace amounts they are exposed to.
Around here, most schools (if not all) are peanut free.
There is no such standard here. At our school, they offer a "peanut free" table for lunch, and if there is a child with allergies in the classroom, a note is sent home to the parents asking to refrain from sending in certain items as snacks. That still doesn't protect a child from everyone else. My friend's son, who I mentioned earlier, has been to the nurse's office many times after being touched by someone at recess who had a peanut butter sandwich for lunch. But realistically, that is the way the world it set up as well, and he has learned to deal with it in this safe, closed environment. If he didn't know, what would happen if he went to, say, a movie, and the person who sat in the seat before him got peanut butter on the arm of the chair? When he's not at home or at school, he carries the epi and Benadryl around his waist in a fanny pack. He knows the symptoms and acts accordingly.
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Old 08-25-2009, 09:17 AM   #29
 
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At my DD's school, the cafeteria has a nut free table for lunch and snack. All children sitting there had to have a nut free lunch.
This is what they have at the schools around us. My son's daycare is also a nut free place. They are really careful when they have parties and parents bring food in. Everything has to be store bought not homemade. I went to buy sliced cheese one time from the deli and noticed it said could have possible nut contamination...I avoided it and bought cheese sticks instead. I feel for all you parents with food allergies.

FYI, daycares do forget even when it's posted with their picture. Chas is allergic to strawberries and cherries. Not severly thankfully because he has been given strawberry yogurt and other items at least 4 times at his daycare. He just gets a severe diaper rash from it...I'm tempted to try it again now that he is potty trained to see what happens but I'll only give him bite not the whole container.
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Old 08-25-2009, 11:09 AM   #30
 
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i dont remember this many serious food allergies growing up...was i in a bubble? have more been diagnosed?
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Old 08-25-2009, 12:20 PM   #31
 
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i dont remember this many serious food allergies growing up...was i in a bubble? have more been diagnosed?
I don't, either, Sleigh. When I first started teaching 20 years ago, I never heard about severe allergies, except for shellfish and dairy. I think it was about 15 years ago when I first heard of a peanut allergy, though it wasn't presented as so severe, just something the child couldn't have. Then, about the time my DD1 entered school (10 years ago) it seemed that every fall we would hear more about peanut/nut allergies and that they can be life threatening. Where this came from, I don't know, but it can be serious business.
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Old 08-25-2009, 12:31 PM   #32
 
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i dont remember this many serious food allergies growing up...was i in a bubble? have more been diagnosed?

Allergies are definitely on the increase, especially severe ones, and especially peanut allergies.

We must be doing something wrong as a society for this to be happening on such a large scale. No one has figured it out yet though.
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Old 08-25-2009, 01:02 PM   #33
 
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i dont remember this many serious food allergies growing up...was i in a bubble? have more been diagnosed?
We must be doing something wrong as a society for this to be happening on such a large scale. No one has figured it out yet though.
I agree. And peanut allergies are also specific to North American/Western societies. Although I've read that sesame seed is described as "the peanut allergy of the East" because in some regions its started to present itself as a very severe allergy.

I have a few thoughts about this - I do think that childhood allergies are much more diagnosed now than before: things like milk, soy, eggs, wheat that are most often outgrown. Back in the day everyone knew that sickly kid with the sensitive stomach and then eventually they outgrew it. That may well have been allergies. If you randomly test for things, you are bound to come up with positive results. I think if most of us submitted for allergy testing we'd be surprised to find out what we are in fact allergic to.

We've had this experience with my daughter. She was so sick while she was exclusively breastfed that we were desperate to find out what was affecting her and against my better judgement, I asked the doctor to test her against wheat, in addition to milk and eggs and soy which we had a good idea that she was allergic to. I just wanted to test all the major things I was eating. Well, it turns out she was allergic to wheat but her number were quite low. But a positive result is a positive result and we spent a year (both she and I) not eating any wheat along with not eating all the other stuff she was allergic too. Well, we just had her re-tested, and her number when down but still not to zero. But this time we decided to challenge the allergy and try feeding her wheat. No reaction. So its possible that we avoided wheat for over a year uneccessarily. And, we've gone straigh to bakery bread that is possibly contaminated with milk, nuts, sesame seeds, eggs (all things she is allergic to) and still no reaction. So I wonder how many other people incorrectly believe their kids are severely allergic to things and have made drastic change to their lifestyle as a result.

But with my daughter, she's been allergic pretty much since birth. Before she had any vaccinations, before she started eating food herself. So I'm at a loss too explain why she is allergic to so many things. My husband has a shellfish allergy, and there is at least partly a hereditary component to food allergies.
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Old 08-25-2009, 04:20 PM   #34
 
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I grew up with pretty sever food allergies and eventually grew out of most of them (shellfish are still triggers for me) along with a pretty nasty bee allergin (still allergic to them). I wore a medical alert bracelet and/or necklace and the school nurse had an epipen for me. Later when I got to highschool, I kept an epipen in my locker and I still carry one with me in my car and in my purse.

My nephew has a peanut allergy and tells adults that give him food that he can't eat peanuts because he's allergic (well now that he can say allergic). When he went to pre-k...a parent brought in cookies and he asked if they had peanuts and the lady said yes and he told her he couldn't eat them. She went to the store and brought him some sugar cookies. The subsitute teacher just thought he was being a picky eater and not wanting to eat what the other kids ate so she wouldn't let him eat the sugar cookies and made him "try" the peanut butter cookies. (I'm assuming she thought he just didn't like the taste of peanut butter). My poor baby's face blew up like a ballon! Luckly, the nurse had his epipen and he was ok. Needless to say, that sub has been barred from working in our school district! After that, my sister got him a medic alert necklace and a shoe tag that goes on his sneakers incase he takes off the necklace.

I still wear a medic alert bracelet, that lists my shellfish as well as bee allergy, so that if I accidentally come into contact with something and go into schock, people will know why.

It's interested that someone mentioned the Chick-fil-a thing...cause my newphew will inhale some chick-fil-a nuggets and waffle fries! I didn't know they used peanut oil...so maybe he's starting to out grow them?
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Old 08-25-2009, 05:09 PM   #35
 
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I grew up with pretty sever food allergies and eventually grew out of most of them (shellfish are still triggers for me) along with a pretty nasty bee allergin (still allergic to them). I wore a medical alert bracelet and/or necklace and the school nurse had an epipen for me. Later when I got to highschool, I kept an epipen in my locker and I still carry one with me in my car and in my purse.

My nephew has a peanut allergy and tells adults that give him food that he can't eat peanuts because he's allergic (well now that he can say allergic). When he went to pre-k...a parent brought in cookies and he asked if they had peanuts and the lady said yes and he told her he couldn't eat them. She went to the store and brought him some sugar cookies. The subsitute teacher just thought he was being a picky eater and not wanting to eat what the other kids ate so she wouldn't let him eat the sugar cookies and made him "try" the peanut butter cookies. (I'm assuming she thought he just didn't like the taste of peanut butter). My poor baby's face blew up like a ballon! Luckly, the nurse had his epipen and he was ok. Needless to say, that sub has been barred from working in our school district! After that, my sister got him a medic alert necklace and a shoe tag that goes on his sneakers incase he takes off the necklace.

I still wear a medic alert bracelet, that lists my shellfish as well as bee allergy, so that if I accidentally come into contact with something and go into schock, people will know why.

It's interested that someone mentioned the Chick-fil-a thing...cause my newphew will inhale some chick-fil-a nuggets and waffle fries! I didn't know they used peanut oil...so maybe he's starting to out grow them?
ive heard that chick fil a is fine for some with peanut allergies because they heat the oil to a high enough temperature that kills the peanut protein, which causes the allergic reaction. i have no clue if thats true or not.
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Old 08-25-2009, 06:32 PM   #36
 
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i dont want her to grow up thinking that a pistachio is a death sentence, but i dont want to be too lax about the situation either.

Being the parent of an allergic kid is a fine and difficult line to walk. My friend's daughter is 11 and has been severely allergic to milk and wheat since birth. She has many allergies, but those are her main ones. I know it's real, because I've seen the kid go into anaphalaxis myself. There are many things she can't eat, but there are also many things she can eat. The problem is...she became so freaking afraid to eat that she barely eats was diagnosed as Failure-To-Thrive at age 5. Her mother is a nervous-panicky type, and I don't think that has helped. She's been treated by eating disorder clinics, because her FTT has now evolved into anorexia. She weighs about 50 pounds now, still severely underweight. She looks skeletal and weak and just very unhealthy. She's homeschooled, because of the allergies, and gets barely any exercise...she's just too tired all the time.

I don't really have any advice. I guess just try to be cautious without showing fear and teaching fear. Hopefully, she'll outgrow the worst of it.
wow thats awful - almost sounds like abuse (not to debate it) but wow.
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Old 08-25-2009, 09:01 PM   #37
 
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I grew up with pretty sever food allergies and eventually grew out of most of them (shellfish are still triggers for me) along with a pretty nasty bee allergin (still allergic to them). I wore a medical alert bracelet and/or necklace and the school nurse had an epipen for me. Later when I got to highschool, I kept an epipen in my locker and I still carry one with me in my car and in my purse.

My nephew has a peanut allergy and tells adults that give him food that he can't eat peanuts because he's allergic (well now that he can say allergic). When he went to pre-k...a parent brought in cookies and he asked if they had peanuts and the lady said yes and he told her he couldn't eat them. She went to the store and brought him some sugar cookies. The subsitute teacher just thought he was being a picky eater and not wanting to eat what the other kids ate so she wouldn't let him eat the sugar cookies and made him "try" the peanut butter cookies. (I'm assuming she thought he just didn't like the taste of peanut butter). My poor baby's face blew up like a ballon! Luckly, the nurse had his epipen and he was ok. Needless to say, that sub has been barred from working in our school district! After that, my sister got him a medic alert necklace and a shoe tag that goes on his sneakers incase he takes off the necklace.

I still wear a medic alert bracelet, that lists my shellfish as well as bee allergy, so that if I accidentally come into contact with something and go into schock, people will know why.

It's interested that someone mentioned the Chick-fil-a thing...cause my newphew will inhale some chick-fil-a nuggets and waffle fries! I didn't know they used peanut oil...so maybe he's starting to out grow them?
ive heard that chick fil a is fine for some with peanut allergies because they heat the oil to a high enough temperature that kills the peanut protein, which causes the allergic reaction. i have no clue if thats true or not.
I'm allergic to tree nuts, too. Peanuts are fine b/c they're legumes (unless her allergist said she was allergic to them, too).

I learned from a very young age to ask if there were nuts in pretty much everything. Most people will go out of their way to make sure stuff is nut-free to prevent any sort of allergic reaction. As long as you teach your daughter to be careful and always carry her meds in case of an accident, she should be fine. Obviously, given her age, you'll have to do the watching out for her for a few years, but I think I knew to ask by around 5 or 6 for myself. Just keep her away from pesto...learned that one the hard way!
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Old 12-08-2012, 04:30 PM   #38
 
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Very interesting thread. Thank you spammer!

My sister is going through something like this with her children. They were diagnosed with type 4 allergies (commonly known as hypersensitivity) two years ago.
My niece is 11 now, she does not understand this, and she s rebelling.
Certainly, a lot of hard work is coming.
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Old 12-08-2012, 09:14 PM   #39
 
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Now that this thread has been bumped I guess I can update. DD1 has since been diagnosed with severe peanut and fish allergies in addition to tree nuts and had anaphylactic reactions to her food allergies...but she has managed to live to the ripe old age of 5. DD2 was allergy tested right after her 1st birthday and her food allergies include tree nuts, peanuts, and eggs. It's gotten a lot easier for me managing their food allergies and keeping then safe!

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Old 12-08-2012, 09:34 PM   #40
 
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Do kids tend to 'grow out' of these as they get older?
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