Almost 38 need skin care advice

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Speckla
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This is my face sans makeup. My upper lids and eyebrows are tattooed on. My skin is still fairly good. I don't tan, I wear no foundation or powder, and I don't really do too much else besides use mascara and lipgloss. I use Ponds coldcream at night to remove my makeup. I am not sure what to do as I get older to keep my skin in good shape.
You have lovely skin and if you already use a daily sunscreen - my suggestion would be to add an over the counter Retinol product such as RoC. It will help you NOW for anti-aging in the years ahead.

I'm 52 yrs old, never wore much makeup but I do like the sun. I use Mineral Fusion - it's a (gluten-free) vitamin enriched mineral-peptide moisturizer and for as much time as I spend out in the sun, it has improved my skin the more I use it.

I find the tattooing interesting - are you happy with it?
____________________________________
Lo-Poo Renpure (RED) Moisturizing Shampoo
Conditioner Renpure (RED) Moisturizing
Styler GVPCB, Biotera Gel
Clarification Suave Daily Clarifying Shampoo, VO5 Vanilla Mint Shampoo, BS/ACV Rinse
DT Pure Coconut Oil
_________________________________

*MAY is Celiac Awareness Month*
Get into the action and educate yourself
to help support those with
Celiac Disease or gluten sensitivities
as it's sadly
a modern day aliment for some many

I am in a similar boat. Approaching 40, have always kept my skin care regiment very simple. I use a gentle eye cream as my moisturizer because my skin is very sensitive and reacts to many ingredients. I figure a cream for the eyes must be gentle. It's been working fine, but I am starting to notice forehead wrinkles and smile lines settling in and want to kick things up a notch. But, I tried retinols years ago and my skin and eyes felt irritated, even with retinol eye cream, even using every other day. Are there gentle ones anyone knows about? Hopefully the formulas have improved since I tried them.

Your skin looks great, Speckla!
Formerly Urbancurl.
Medium-high density, fine-medium, low-normal porosity, 3b/c, permanent color.
CG, no heat, combs, brushes, parabens.
Fall/Winter HG=Alba Botanica Soft Hold Style Cream.
Spring/Summer HG=MGA Sculpting Gel
Current fave LI=Madre Labs Made by Nature for Baby Conditioner.
Limit oils, butters, glycerin.
Nice pic! Nice skin, I'm playing around with the origins line.

Does anyone have any product suggestions to use under the eyes?

I've also noticed a little loose skin under the top of my neck, o no turkey neck! Where did my youth go lol!
3C .....thru......10Z
Holy Grail Products:
KCCC, KT


Nothing exudes confidence like a woman comfortable in her own skin.

http://members.fotki.com/parislarue/about/
"But, I tried retinols years ago and my skin and eyes felt irritated, even with retinol eye cream, even using every other day. Are there gentle ones anyone knows about? Hopefully the formulas have improved since I tried them." - diaspora

I'm having the same experience lately, even with the supposedly gentle Neutrogena Healthy Skin Anti-Wrinkle Cream(the original one, not the Ageless Intensives one that's newer) that dermatologists recommend as a beginner OTC product before moving up to anything stronger. Even with applying Cetaphil Moisturizing Cream over it doesn't seem to help all that much and that cream is rich! I've tried just using the retinol every other night - same deal. I'm alternating with CeraVe PM - it has niacinamides in it which are great for more sensitive skin types and have real skin benefits - google "niacinamides for skin" and you'll get plenty of info. I might just be shifting over to just the CeraVe PM at night and dropping the retinol. But first I'm going to go a month without it and just use the CeraVe PM to see what that does, and try re-introducing the Neutrogena. If those dry under-eye patches come back, then I'll have my answer. I'm a lot older than the original poster though so that might have something to do with it. Skin does tend to get more sensitive as we get older, because it is starting to thin out, thus disturbing our skin's barrier function. The CeraVe line does address this and in fact is recommended by dermatologists for this very reason. It's very compatible with Rx topicals too, like Retin-A, etc. as it helps rebuild skin barrier. Hope this helps!
Ceramix, wow, even the Neutrogena was irritating? That's the one I was thinking of trying, so thanks for posting that. Good that you're liking the CeraVe PM, it does look good, though unfortunately they added parabens as their preservative and I can't use those. Maybe I can find something else with niacinamide in it-- that's a B vitamin I think? I didn't know it was helpful for sensitive skin, but I will try it as my skin's been sensitive all my life. Hives, irritation, peeling, excema...
Formerly Urbancurl.
Medium-high density, fine-medium, low-normal porosity, 3b/c, permanent color.
CG, no heat, combs, brushes, parabens.
Fall/Winter HG=Alba Botanica Soft Hold Style Cream.
Spring/Summer HG=MGA Sculpting Gel
Current fave LI=Madre Labs Made by Nature for Baby Conditioner.
Limit oils, butters, glycerin.
If you do nothing else for your skin, make sure you use a good sunscreen moisturizer.
Hi ladies -
Interesting topic...I've always taken good care of my skin and I also try to wear sunscreen whenever in the sun. Luckily people guess that I'm younger than my age (43). If anyone has suggestions on a good neck firming cream, I'd also be interested. I've been using L'oreal Revitalift for the neck and see no real improvement in firmness - but it's moisturizing. My issue is needing more firmness in the under-the-chin area. I've used the Serious Skincare line sold on HSN/ and also Philosophy.
2b/3a fine/med-hi density/high porosity (I think)/ highlight-no silicones/sulfates
Lo-poo - ABBA Gentle Shampoo/ Shea Moisture Curl & Shine
Conditioner: GVCB (love it!)/ Regis OO
Leave in
: As I Am
Co-Wash: Tresemme or DevaCurl NoPoo
Stylers: As I Am Curling Jelly/GF Pure Clean/ LALCurl gel - all with BRHG added
Style: scrunch/ diffuse, then air dry. I don't Have much frizz at all
There are very few things that actually do anything for anti-aging. Retin-A is one. Retinol is not Retin-A...retinols are basically a waste of time and money, but some people think they help a teeny-weeny bit...they don't, but perception is reality I guess. Not everyone can tolerate Retin-A because it's so drying and irritating. One must start slow with a low dosage and work up gradually. If you're a dry-skinned person, you can try Renova, which is Retin-A mixed with heavy moisturizers. Renova is an Rx product, just like Retin-A. Retin-A products speed up cell turnover and uncover fresh new skin faster, and also reverses sun damage.

Vitamin C products can help brighten skin and reverse sun damage. It doesn't look like you need help with that, since you wisely avoided sun most of your life.

For skin firming, the only thing clinically proven to help is DMAE. It's a vitamin derivative that is used in a alkaline base, which can be irritating and drying. PSFskincare.com has the only DMAE product that I know of that is at the proper pH that was tested to be effective. Lots of other companies offer DMAE, but if the pH is wrong, it's worthless.

That's about it. Moisturizer is of no value in anti-aging. It's also over-hyped by the skincare industry to get our money. They tell us that EVERYONE needs moisturizer. Not true. You only need to use moisturizer if your skin feels dry. If you don't have a dryness issue, than you don't need it. I never use moisturizer, because my skin is naturally oily.

Sunscreen...has been proved to be a bunch of bologna in recent years. The people with the most sun damage and skin cancers are the ones who use the most sunscreen. Better to avoid the sun, and wear hats and seek shade, than to smear expensive sunscreen on your face every day and have a false sense of security that you're helping your skin, especially the folks who think that a thin coat of sunscreen applied at 7am is doing anything for them at 2pm. It's only good for a couple hours folks. That's it. And if you want decent protection from it, you need to apply it quite thickly...more thickly than would look good under makeup.

Your skin looks really good, Speck.
Very interesting RCW, and thought-provoking. I never considered questioning any of that, especially the bits about the effectiveness of sunscreen and moisturizer. Will definitely have to look into it.

Sent from The Brick
I just want to do what I want to do when I want to do it.
Just to clarify, i do think sunscreen has some value...and i do use it occasionally. I use it when i have no alternative but to be in direct sun. I apply thickly and frequently, and get out of the sun as soon as i can.
Not quite 40,

But last time I had a facial she told me I should rotate in a cleanser containing salicylic acid to exfoliate my skin.

I'm pretty simple w skin care. Right now I use a baby wash cleanser, a moisturizer for sensitive skin, sometimes aloe instead in the summer, and L'Oreal Youth Code cleanser about twice a week.

I love Ponds cold cream too.

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You gave up the Noxzema, iroc?
Originally Posted by RedCatWaves
Nope, I still go back and forth with it. Just dont have any right now.

I like shaving with it too

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I must say, I have to agree with much of what RedCatWaves says. This is why I refuse to spend big $$ for a simple moisturizer. Stuff like Cetaphil Cream, and the CeraVe products, and my shea butter-coconut oil combo are my friends and a whole lot less expensive than the hyped-up stuff with some "rare ingredient from the sea"/everything but the kitchen sink type of "feel nice, smell-nice" miracles creams. Don't fall for these, whatever one does! Even among very wealthy people who could well afford a lot of this stuff, either a trip to the dermatologist for that Retin-A, or a simple drugstore moisturizer is often what they do. All a moisturizer does is moisturize, period, and they really do help dry skin feel and look better due to the plumping action afforded by actually rather basic ingredients. I do rotate in a glycolic acid cleanser for exfoliation that works very well without trashing my skin, as my skin doesn't like leave-on AHAs etc.
The big guns that RCW mentions, however, are off-limits for many with sensitive skins, like mine for example. I'm inclined to agree about the retinols too, not enough difference to make it really worth it plus they dry my skin out, which I don't need at nearly age 65 now. In fact, I was reading not too long ago that by the time one is in one's 60s and up, the use of even retinols, let along Retin-A might have to be ramped down, if not let go, on account of the fact that skin becomes thinner and more sensitive in general(unless one naturally has very thick, resistant skin that's an oil well besides - there really are such people).
About sunscreens, I was just about to give up myself, as the all-chemical ones burn me, and the physical blocks tend to whiten me out such that makeup can't fix it, or have some really unpleasant texture, or make me break out. I'm not out in the sun that much anyway, and I refuse to smear sunblock thickly all over my body just on general principle. There are people who are so sun-phobic that they wear sunblock on their entire body even if they're not going out in shorts and a t-shirt/bathing suit. For me, I just have the CeraVe AM SPF 30 moisturizer, which I know isn't one of the industrial-strength type of sunblocks that people over on another board recommend, but at least it doesn't bother my skin. The others do.
As far as skin cancer goes, there are people who get melanoma who are almost never out in the sun, so the sun is not the only culprit - there's something else more systemic going on. Some alternative practitioners are saying that a person's diet influences a lot in this regard, in that the junk fats that many people are eating are present in one's skin, and react with sunlight, thereby contributing to skin cancers. They also put it out there that if one is clean from the inside out, from eating a largely raw vegetarian diet, the sun is much less harmful than believed. Still, even they don't advocate baking all day in the sun. Another factor that cannot be ignored - is that being so afraid of the sun causes a great deal of stress which also can't be good for one's health. Just respect it, it's a lot larger than you, like the ocean. Remember the old saying "Only mad dogs and Englishmen are out and about in the noonday sun" - meaning that it's wise to lay low then anyway, just like current advice says.
I think much of the "sunscare" is over-hyped. We need some sun --some of us need more than others. I have a skin condition. Last year, purely out of vanity for a wedding I was going to be in, I decided to do some controlled tanning (in a tanning bed). At the time, I (TMI alert) had red, oozing sores along my hairline, and I was developing the same thing on two of my fingers. It was painful and very embarrassing. After about 2 weeks of tanning for 10 minutes every other day, it was all gone. ALL of it. Not only that, but my skin was glowing. It truly was. I stopped tanning after about a month, but made sure to get at least 10 minutes of sun most days, making sure a large portion of my skin was exposed.

The sores stayed gone until about mid-winter, when it all started coming back. I dealt with it for awhile, but it got so bad that I went back to the tanning salon. It's all gone again. I can only conclude that it has something to do with a lack of Vitamin D. Before anyone asks, yes I did try to keep my D levels up by eating Vitamin D rich foods and taking supplements. It never did a thing. I've been battling this condition for 8 years. If UV exposure is what makes it go away, then I obviously need the exposure. The key is to avoid burning, and I do avoid it.

I also don't use suncreen. I have a hard time with the idea that I should be so afraid of the sun that I'm willing to slather myself in chemicals and let the sun bake them into my skin. No thanks.

I do agree with RCW that not everyone needs moisturizers. I do because I have dry skin, but not everyone does.

My .02
2C/3A, fine, higher porosity.
I think much of the "sunscare" is over-hyped. We need some sun --some of us need more than others. I have a skin condition. Last year, purely out of vanity for a wedding I was going to be in, I decided to do some controlled tanning (in a tanning bed). At the time, I (TMI alert) had red, oozing sores along my hairline, and I was developing the same thing on two of my fingers. It was painful and very embarrassing. After about 2 weeks of tanning for 10 minutes every other day, it was all gone. ALL of it. Not only that, but my skin was glowing. It truly was. I stopped tanning after about a month, but made sure to get at least 10 minutes of sun most days, making sure a large portion of my skin was exposed.

The sores stayed gone until about mid-winter, when it all started coming back. I dealt with it for awhile, but it got so bad that I went back to the tanning salon. It's all gone again. I can only conclude that it has something to do with a lack of Vitamin D. Before anyone asks, yes I did try to keep my D levels up by eating Vitamin D rich foods and taking supplements. It never did a thing. I've been battling this condition for 8 years. If UV exposure is what makes it go away, then I obviously need the exposure. The key is to avoid burning, and I do avoid it.

I also don't use suncreen. I have a hard time with the idea that I should be so afraid of the sun that I'm willing to slather myself in chemicals and let the sun bake them into my skin. No thanks.

I do agree with RCW that not everyone needs moisturizers. I do because I have dry skin, but not everyone does.

My .02
Originally Posted by JLeighs
ITA with these sentiments. I'm much more afraid of the chemicals in most sunscreens (and am allergic to some of them) than I am of the sun. Since I've done some reading on it not sponsored by the manufacturers or the FDA, who I consider bought off on many topics, I believe that "everyone must wear sunscreen all the time" is a marketing scam to support the cosmetics industry. This is a pretty controversial subject and I usually say nothing when people bring up sunscreen, but since it already came up..

Some people think a main reason Vitamin D deficiency is so prevalent in the US is because people use so much sunscreen and avoid the sun.

I've rarely used sunscreen the past 10 years and don't look any more aged than other 39 year olds-- in fact people are often surprised that I'm older than 30. (This probably has to do with genetics more than anything else though.)
JLeighs and wavyblonde like this.
Formerly Urbancurl.
Medium-high density, fine-medium, low-normal porosity, 3b/c, permanent color.
CG, no heat, combs, brushes, parabens.
Fall/Winter HG=Alba Botanica Soft Hold Style Cream.
Spring/Summer HG=MGA Sculpting Gel
Current fave LI=Madre Labs Made by Nature for Baby Conditioner.
Limit oils, butters, glycerin.
JLeighs - fantastic that you found the missing link for your skin situation. I'm sure there are others who benefit too. Actually, I do know one person who had on and off psoriasis ever since she was in her late teens, and seriously, the sun did her good. She lives in Hawaii now, so that's easy to do, plus she has a brown skin tone to begin with.
I must say I have to agree with you about the suncare thing being over-hyped, and the fear of God put into people so that they willingly coat themselves daily with questionable sunblocks that come with their own problems, like xenoestrogens, the chemicals that act as hormone disruptors, for instance. People can say all they want about sunblocks being totally safe, as well as certain industrial-strength treatments, but alternative practitioners often say that the skin is a lot more permeable than we think with up to 60% of what we apply to our skins eventually ends up in our blood streams. They routinely advise avoiding commercial skin care and body products in general and advocate basic simple care with plain natural products.
The correct amounts of sunblock advocated by dermatologists is truly staggering. One well-known female dermatologist says that one should apply enough sunblock to the entire body before heading out, such that one would leave a big grease stain on a plastic chair. One recently even recommended applying it like one would frosting to a cupcake! Still others say that for 2 people going to the beach for the afternoon, that that 4-oz. bottle should only last one for just the one afternoon. You can see where this is going with the money that one would be spending, as well as the sheer assault of all this goop on the skin - yikes! Not awfully long ago, it was put out there that a family could expect to spend $1000 on sunblock for the summer. Equals big bucks for the industry!
I'm pretty fair skinned, blonde/blue eyes and I've used sunscreen about 5 times in my entire life.

I've lived at elevations over a mile high my entire life - that means more exposure to radiation from the sun.

I worked at ski-resorts and mountain resorts until I was in my early 30's.

You would think I have leather-skin at the least, or skin cancer at worst, but nope, my skin is in pretty good condition for a 55 year old whose never had any sort of 'procedure' of any kind.
Photo: may 13 comp | My first album | Colorcountry | Fotki.com, photo and video sharing made easy.

The correct amounts of sunblock advocated by dermatologists is truly staggering. One well-known female dermatologist says that one should apply enough sunblock to the entire body before heading out, such that one would leave a big grease stain on a plastic chair. One recently even recommended applying it like one would frosting to a cupcake! Still others say that for 2 people going to the beach for the afternoon, that that 4-oz. bottle should only last one for just the one afternoon. You can see where this is going with the money that one would be spending, as well as the sheer assault of all this goop on the skin - yikes! Not awfully long ago, it was put out there that a family could expect to spend $1000 on sunblock for the summer. Equals big bucks for the industry!
Originally Posted by caramix3a


Yeah, it's crazy, and mostly a marketing ploy to get us to spend more money on sunscreen. The sun damage we get walking to our cars is minimal.

I buy one bottle of sunscreen a year...for a family of 6...and we never use it up. I replace it each summer because I figure it's expired. We mostly just use common sense, seek shade, wear hats and other protective clothing...and stay the hell out of the sun at high noon. None of us ever lay out to bake on purpose. That just seems stupid.

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