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Old 05-30-2008, 07:22 PM   #21
 
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Damn, I just bought 6 Morning Glory plants at the garden store today, to train onto my fence. So you're saying I shouldn't plant them?
Yeah, I think it's field bindweed people are talking about here. I've never known morning glories to be invasive.

I have some m.g. seedlings here I am going to plant this weekend! Along with some moonflower.
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Old 06-01-2008, 11:47 AM   #22
 
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Well, my Morning Glory dreams may all be moot. Last night we had some serious HAIL-- it was still in piles in our yard this morning. My Morning Glories all look like they've been chewed, they were so battered. I hope they survive.
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Old 06-02-2008, 08:49 AM   #23
 
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I think I see some morning glories coming up in my community garden plot. So I guess they can reseed themselves. Unless it's something else, I can never keep track of all the seeds I scatter. I didn't have a problem controlling the m.g last year though. Pulled them once and they were gone! Bindweed is a whole nother story.

I have vetch growing everywhere too. I hate to pull it up, because the blooms are pretty and the bees and even some birds love it. Also, its roots break up hard soil and I believe it fixes nitrogen in the soil. But it sure takes over. Why aren't my carefully selected and nurtured plants thriving like the weeds?
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Old 06-03-2008, 11:01 AM   #24
 
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I'm telling you, morning glories definitely reseed and can be invasive. I started with four little plants, grown from seeds. Years later, there are literally hundreds of little starters after it rains, throughout the growing season. They choked out and killed the rose I'd planted in memorial. The artemesia is all but gone, and the black-eyed susans are still fighting the fight. I'm also finding the plants all around my house, not just that one corner. Right now, they're mostly 2-8 leaves on the plants, but I pulled up a bunch yesterday. I can't keep up. The only thing that seems to stop them is frost. They wither immediately, but every single flower on the vine goes to seed when that happens.
I don't mean to scare anyone, because they are so beautiful. I just wish someone had told me how much they'd take over back when I planted them. I would have found a different place for them to go. They don't stay on the fence because there are bushes and tall plants for them to grow up. If the fence were all on it's own, I'd definitely plant on it.
Not my picture, but this is what mine look like. They bloom blue and fade to pink over several days:

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Old 06-03-2008, 11:10 AM   #25
 
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Well, my Morning Glory dreams may all be moot. Last night we had some serious HAIL-- it was still in piles in our yard this morning. My Morning Glories all look like they've been chewed, they were so battered. I hope they survive.
All my varied and tortuous physical ailments [head cold, ear infection] have kept me from the garden. Silver lining! My plants didn't get pelted, they are still safe in my living room.

They're getting rather large though, I need to get them in the ground before too long.
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Old 06-03-2008, 11:16 AM   #26
 
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The only thing that seems to stop them is frost.
Yeah, I don't think they overwinter here. We're Zones 4/5.
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Old 06-03-2008, 11:40 AM   #27
 
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I just wish someone had told me how much they'd take over back when I planted them.
That pretty much sums up my entire gardening life. My mom has a real knack for planting invasive species. I thought I could learn from her experiences and avoid those. HA. She brought me 3 little perennial vincas and now I'm beating the stuff back with a blowtorch. Also, do not talk to me about agastache. It seeds up everywhere and never attracted a single humming bird! Boo! Although finches like to eat the seeds. Creeping charlie is everywhere in our neighborhood, and also burdock.
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Old 06-03-2008, 02:16 PM   #28
 
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I think we may be confusing some of the new gardeners here.
Bindweed is a perennial vine that looks like a morning glory. It is wild, is very invasive - it re-seeds and also spreads underground which is what makes it so hard to get rid of. It doesn't die so it just keeps travelling and getting bigger every year.
Morning glories are annuals. No matter what region you live in - they germinate, flower, go to seed, and die in the same year. They don't come back the next year like a perennial plant.
Supposedly some of the prettiest varieties are sterile and cannot reproduce or re-seed. There are others that can re-seed especially in open flower beds. If you only have a few vines you can remove the seed heads. If not, the seedlings have shallow roots and are easily removed. Of course if you have a large number of plants and a zillion seedlings sprouting where you don't want them, they can certainly be a pain.
So just pot up those strays and sell them!! Especially if they're the blue variety. People love those!!!
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Old 06-03-2008, 04:44 PM   #29
 
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I'm appreciative of all the clarification I've gotten here. I had no idea that the nuisance vine I had was bindweed, not morning glory. I'm going to try the Roundup on mine as nothing else seems to deter it. Was going to do it yesterday, but it started raining in the evening so I had to cancel that plan. I just hope that I don't kill my flowers in the process!
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Old 06-04-2008, 09:27 AM   #30
 
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Jeepy, you reminded me that I never sent you seeds. I'm so sorry!
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Old 06-04-2008, 01:44 PM   #31
 
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Well, hey my memory lasts about 4 seconds so I totally forgot you were supposed to send me some!
Was I supposed to send YOU some?
And if so, DID I? : )
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Old 06-04-2008, 02:19 PM   #32
 
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You sent me some seeds for red flowers (which I forgot to plant!) and I was supposed to send the blue morning glory seeds. If my husband doesn't kill the vines this year, I can collect and send them on.
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Old 06-15-2008, 04:08 PM   #33
 
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Just a quick note for the newish gardeners on pulling - the two most important things I've learned about it are that it really helps a lot to do it while the ground is soft and to have the right tool. It's not only easier on you, it helps to get the root out intact much more often, which means fewer return weeds down the road. Depending on your part of the country, especially the arid west or southwest, this can mean that if it hasn't rained the day before you should water the ground where you plan to weed. Then after it's dried out a bit (you don't want it muddy, just moist enough to work with and release roots) you get to work. Don't waste your time or energy trying to work in dry packed earth, it just won't work.

The best tool for weeding I've ever found is a Japanese Hori Hori knife or weeder, especially for things like this that have spreading rhizomes or a tap root. It looks wicked and can be a bit pricey, but there's nothing better for getting really deep right under or next to a root and lifting that whole sucker out. I first used it while I was volunteering for years at the Denver Botanic Garden and all the volunteers and paid staff would fight over who nabbed the Hori Hori first, every time. I also tried for years to get my mom (who has an acre to garden in the Four Corners area of Colorado) to buy one and finally just bought it for her as a gift, since she didn't believe it could be that good. Now she walks around with it strapped to her belt and won't let anyone touch it. It's her prized gardening tool.
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Old 08-30-2008, 01:12 PM   #34
 
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Starina--how's the battle of the bindweed going? Any progress?

On a side note, the morning glories that I grew last summer at the community garden DID reseed and came back with a vengeance this summer. They're not bindweed. They haven't been too hard to control, but I'm going to have to say that they can come back. In the mean time, I've got volunteers everywhere...Joe Pye weed, which I like, and datura, which I don't like so much and yank up.
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Old 09-01-2008, 09:46 AM   #35
 
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Hi Castella, it's a neverending battle. I did spend a lot more time this summer pulling it as it came up as you guys advised, but I went on vacation for eight days and when I came back, it was everywhere. I had planned to try the weed killer on it, but it rained for almost two weeks solid and I never did get around to it as I got side tracked with other things. That stuff really does grow incredibly fast. Also I've been working on my house getting it ready to sell, so I didn't spend as much time as I would have liked keeping the flower border free of weeds. So the morning glories won't be a problem? I imagine they spread pretty fast also.
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Old 09-01-2008, 10:52 AM   #36
 
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One way to prevent plants from spreading too much that have a tendency to spread underground is to get a big coffee can, remove the bottom and the top, and plant the plant inside of it underground. I wanted mint for a while (don't ask me why I wanted mint for a while) and I didn't do that. After one season I had almost nothing but mint. After that I learned of this little trick and it works well for a lot of plants that want to take over.
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Old 09-02-2008, 10:13 AM   #37
 
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curlygirl 81, I've read that. Spreading plants are so persistent though that I think I would stay away with anything with a reputation for taking over like mint. Somehow or other they always seem to sneak out of their boundaries. Coffee cans rust when in the ground and break down so you have to be careful with that.
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Old 09-02-2008, 11:01 AM   #38
 
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The success of the coffee can method (or you can use a plastic pail with the bottom cut out, or punctured for drainage) depends on the type of plant. Some invasive species spread through creepers above the ground or through reseeding. Bindweed spreads underground AND through seeds. It's a stinker!
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Old 09-02-2008, 11:02 AM   #39
 
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Coffee cans rust when in the ground and break down so you have to be careful with that.
That's a really good point. I've since moved into a townhouse and don't have a garden at present so it's been a few years. I've also heard that if you want to get a lot of flowers with Bird of Paradise then you must constrain the plant in a tub. I saw a public garden where they had giant BoP plants and they had used 3-foot diameter wooden tubs to get the proper bud production. It was really beautiful.
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Old 09-02-2008, 12:32 PM   #40
 
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Quote:
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Coffee cans rust when in the ground and break down so you have to be careful with that.
That's a really good point. I've since moved into a townhouse and don't have a garden at present so it's been a few years. I've also heard that if you want to get a lot of flowers with Bird of Paradise then you must constrain the plant in a tub. I saw a public garden where they had giant BoP plants and they had used 3-foot diameter wooden tubs to get the proper bud production. It was really beautiful.

Oh, if only BoP would grow in Pennsylvania. I love them...
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