Need gardening help

Thought I would post my question on this forum instead of the "younger" non-hair forum, probably more gardeners in the over 40 crowd (of which I'm one). Does anyone know how to get rid of morning glories? I have a small flower border filled with perennials. By mid-summer the morning glories have choked out everything. The vines crawl and climb on all my flowers and no matter how much I pull them out the just come right back. I think they grow by way of underground runners. I am so tired of trying to keep up with them! I think that if I stood there for an hour I could actually see them growing, that's how fast they grow. Help!
I have 3A hair. I've discovered Jessicurl shampoo and Too Shea conditioner and I'm thrilled! Long-time LA Looks sport gel user.
You may have to shoot them with total vegetation killer if pulling & digging them out does no good. But that's going to kill off your flowers too unless you transplant them to a safe zone first. But I'd be a bit worried of transplanting a piece of the weed with them.
You need to either pull morning glories as soon as you see them -- all summer long for the next several years, or you can spray with something like Round-up which will kill your preferred plants, too, unless you transplant them first. I planted one morning glory vine about 9 years ago and still find seedlings every year. I just pull them as I see them. It'll get easier each year so long as you never let them go to seed, but you need to stay on top of them....
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Ugh, morning glories, while beautiful, are the bane of my front garden. I planted 4 vines about 8 years ago, and I'm still fighting those things. They don't spread by runners, but the seeds have a hard outer coat that needs water to soften up and allow the seed to sprout. I find hundreds of little start ups about a couple days after a rain. My husband squirts what he can with Round-up, but unfortunately it can make the situation worse because Round-up kills all the vegetation, leaving a bare patch in which dormant seeds can sprout without problem. I keep meaning to put down Preen every few weeks to stop the seeds from sprouting, but I'm lazy and just haven't done it.
I try to pull out all the seedlings I find, but with hundreds sprouting every few days, it's impossible to keep up on it. This spring I discovered they killed my memorial rose bush and I'm surprised one of my dogwoods hasn't died.
I wish I could just let them go, because they are so beautiful in the mornings (mine bloom blue and slowly fade to purple then pink over several days), but I've found the seeds get blown by the wind and they've spread far, not to mention them choking out other plants. If I transplant anything from that area I have to be very careful and watch for seedlings around the new planting.
There's no such thing as global warming. Chuck Norris was cold so he turned up the sun.
Wow, I will put on my mental check list to never plant these in my garden! This is a great forum to check out:

http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/

They may offer some organic methods for removal. I have used vinegar before to remove weeds.
Mod CG since April of 2007.
I was afraid the news was going to be grim. I try to pull the seedlings out, but there are so many and they grow so fast! Can't use any kind of chemicals as I don't want to kill my flowers. Guess I'll just have to keep on pulling.

Thanks for your advice everyone, and Infraredhead I will check out the link.
I have 3A hair. I've discovered Jessicurl shampoo and Too Shea conditioner and I'm thrilled! Long-time LA Looks sport gel user.
Wow,

I have to start my morning glories from seed every year! They never come back!

Ok....have you tried pinching the blooms off them?

Also is it really a Morning Glory or a close cousin?

I love my Morning Glories. But I also plant them in a bucket and provide a trellis for them to grow on. In the fall I collect the seeds for next year.
I'm just asking to eliminate this possibility...are you sure it is morning glories you are battling, and not the dreaded bindweed? Bindweed is an invasive that looks a lot like morning glories. Bindweed blooms are usually white or pale pink. Field bindweed hugs the ground and smothers everything in its path. Hedge bindweed climbs. Morning glories and bindweed belong to the same family of plants.

I had a major bindweed infestation in my community garden plots, which got out of hand because initially I did not know what I was dealing with. It took me 2 years to get it under control.

The plants spread by brittle rhizomes underground, and by seed. You can dig up the rhizomes, but because they are brittle, any piece 1" or longer that you miss can continue to produce vines. Also, you won't want to dig in your perennial bed. Also, the rhizomes can go down quite deep (up to 30' for field bindweed!) and digging them up will give you nightmares.

The rhizomes store the food that feed the plant. If you CONSTANTLY (at least once a week) yank up or cut off the emerging vines, the rhizomes will expend all their energy in producing new vines and eventually (in theory) will die. This approach requires constant vigilence. This is what I've been doing for maintenance, after my 2 years of digging and sifting through soil.

Roundup kills them. If you can isolate the vines by spreading cardboard or plastic wrap or foil over the plants you don't want killed, all you have to do is spray the leaves on the vine with roundup. Do it on a sunny day. Wait until the roundup dries before you uncover the perennials. The roundup is carried down to the plants' roots and kills them, then supposedly degenerates in the soil without harming surrounding plants. I've used roundup in this way at home (it's not allowed at the community garden), and it worked...but if there's any wind and it carries the spray onto a "good" plant, you might lose it.

I have quite the collection of articles on how to deal with bindweed, if you are interested, LOL. I can also post pictures! Anyway, what works for bindweed will work for morning glories.
formerly Castella
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Mike McGrath of You Bet Your Garden on NPR (love that guy) has some interesting stuff to say about morning glories and how to tell it from bind weed and how to get rid of both (he says to sell your house if it's bind weed, but only in the winter ).
Damn, I just bought 6 Morning Glory plants at the garden store today, to train onto my fence. So you're saying I shouldn't plant them?
Minneapolis, MN
We had the evil bind weed at my house with the ex. I left the house with the ex - I am sure he just let the bind weed take over!!
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I don't think morning glories are invasive, at least not in my climate (zone 5, on a good day). Lots of people grow morning glories at the community garden, and they are NOT a problem.

I even grew morning glories last year and had no issue with them taking over.

Yes, I have many pictures of Morning Glory Vs The Plague Called Bindweed. MG blooms are larger than BW blooms and more vivid. Let's just say that my plot neighbor and I became bindweed experts. We can tell you every location within a 25 mile radius where we spotted it growing. Both of us had nightmares about the rhizome and root systems...Some gardeners left their invested plots to take over newer plots, but not us.

Apparently pigs like to eat bindweed rhizomes, but that involves letting pigs root around in your yard, and also, they have to be pretty hungry before they'll go to all that work.

All the landscaping experts that I asked told me to use roundup. It does work on bindweed. But if you're outside nearly every day walking the estate and taking in the beauty of your garden, it's not a big deal to yank up every vine you see while loudly blaming the neighbors for letting their weeds take over your yard.
formerly Castella
(my dogs aren't snarly, my hair is)
Castella, I think you may be right! I had no idea, I always thought they were morning glories, but the blooms are small and white and seem to grow by some kind of runner root system that spreads underground. Everything you said fits my situation exactly. I think I will try the Roundup (very carefully). I always thought that it would leach into the ground and poison other plants besides the ones you're trying to kill. So that's not true?

I knew I could count on you curlies for some good info!
I have 3A hair. I've discovered Jessicurl shampoo and Too Shea conditioner and I'm thrilled! Long-time LA Looks sport gel user.
Seven years ago we had a brick conservatory built at the back of our house, with solid concrete foundations and a blue brick course. It went over the top of a tiny patch of bindweed, and at the time I thought "Hah, that'll get you".

How wrong I was .
Well, I'm not happy for you that it seems to be bindweed, but all is not lost!

Of the two, hedge bindweed is easier to attack.

Roundup says that it only kills the plants on which it is directly applied. My experience with it is that this is true (except that it's kind of easy to accidently get it on other plants). I use it on deep-rooted weeds that grow along the sidewalk and spiky hostile weeds. And I used it on the bindweed that was growing on the neighbor's yard. I didn't want that stuff moving over. It killed the bindweed, woo HOO. Neighbor never noticed. I've used it pretty liberally on plantain weeds close to grass, hostas and young trees and only the plantain weeds died.

Sometimes the weeds come back, though.

I'm past my bindweed trauma and can even admit that the blooms are pretty. It's a weed that you can not ignore, though. I found this article helpful. It let me give up on my goal of complete eradication and live with a new goal of holding the perimeter.

http://www2.ljworld.com/news/2005/au...t_you_twisted/
formerly Castella
(my dogs aren't snarly, my hair is)
Damn, I just bought 6 Morning Glory plants at the garden store today, to train onto my fence. So you're saying I shouldn't plant them?
Originally Posted by Poodlehead
Poodlehead, it's totally up to you and what you their purpose would be. To cover a fence, where other vegetation isn't growing would be a perfect place for these, as well as an empty space of ground.
I would love to let them grow because they're so beautiful in the morning. Unfortunately, they grow over my garden plants. The year I planted the morning glories along the fence, I planted another vine growing up a shepherd's hook and my mailbox. There weren't any new plants in that spot the next year. I like the idea of cutting off the blossoms before they seed. Afterall, this plant can't create seeds with out flowers. I live in Zone 5A so the ones I originally planted must have very hardy seeds.
There's no such thing as global warming. Chuck Norris was cold so he turned up the sun.
Castella, thanks for the link. Now that I know what I'm dealing with, I did a little research. Bindweed is tough stuff! I'm kind of disheartened, but I'll keep pulling away and I'm definitely going to experiment with the Roundup. I appreciate everyone's input!
I have 3A hair. I've discovered Jessicurl shampoo and Too Shea conditioner and I'm thrilled! Long-time LA Looks sport gel user.
I remember seeing a TV gardening show where they used two techniques for putting Roundup on bindweed. In one bed they put several posts or canes and began to train the bindweed up it. I can't recall how long they left it growing there, but it did seem to isolate the bindweed from other plants fairly effectively, making it easier to spray.

The second method involved decanting the Roundup into a bucket. Wearing tough rubber gloves they dipped their hands into the Roundup and then ran their hands along the length of each bindweed tendril. This was in a country-style border with a mass of plants where spraying was difficult. I'm sure they said it needed several repeat applications.

Good luck with it anyway! I don't think it's possible to eradicate mine without digging up the house, but I pull it out whenever I see it and just keep it under control. It's a total pain.
Mike McGrath of You Bet Your Garden on NPR (love that guy) has some interesting stuff to say about morning glories and how to tell it from bind weed and how to get rid of both (he says to sell your house if it's bind weed, but only in the winter ).
Originally Posted by RedCatWaves
Ditto that. He has lots of useful info (but I'm in love with him so you can't go by what I say. He came to our town here few years ago and I acted like a giddy school girl while talking to him. hee.)

Bindweed is the devil. Morning glories are wonderful plants.
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Wow, I will put on my mental check list to never plant these in my garden! This is a great forum to check out:

http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/

They may offer some organic methods for removal. I have used vinegar before to remove weeds.
Originally Posted by Infraredhead
Thanks for the forum...I just signed up...had a couple of questions...hopefully someone will reply!
cjc
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